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Thread: Drop Tips

  1. #1
    Member willidru's Avatar
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    Default Drop Tips

    Need some help getting my pup to drop the bumper when returning. She is 15wks I'm trying to keep it fun, but it sure is frustrating that she doesn't want to release the bumper. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Breck's Avatar
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    And easy thing to do is simply stick your finger in the back of her mouth, behind the bumper, and press down on her tongue with finger.
    Instant mouth opening trigger.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by willidru View Post
    Need some help getting my pup to drop the bumper when returning. She is 15wks I'm trying to keep it fun, but it sure is frustrating that she doesn't want to release the bumper. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
    As long as She's not playing 'keep away', grasp the bumper with one hand and pinch her lower lip against her molar with the other hand. Breck's suggestion will work, too.

    If she's running around, not wanting to deliver, that's a separate issue.

    By the way, She'll be teething soon and will drop bumpers or even not want to pick them up. Paint rollers work pretty good at that stage of development. Add weight by stuffing an old sock inside and taping the ends shut.-Paul
    there's no good reason to fatten up a retriever.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Daniel J Simoens's Avatar
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    Have another bumper in your other hand and distract her with it.
    That's my boy "Blue"!!!! Flyin High in the Passenger Side x Katie May of Belgrade

  5. #5
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    grab the little flap of skin that goes from her hind quarter to the rib cage and pull up. mouth opens instantly

  6. #6
    Senior Member ks_hunting's Avatar
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    This is actually a trait I prefer over a tendency to drop the bumper at your feet. There are some great suggestions here on how to open the mouth, but one I might add is to slightly rotate the bumper as your pulling it out. It helps break their grip. Also, I'd hope you're adding a command (drop, dead, give etc) each time you take it from their mouth so you have a drop command already established when the pup is older.

  7. #7
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    All good suggestions. You can also use your foot closest to the dog to tap them on the toe. This will also cause the dog to instantly open their mouth.

  8. #8
    Member willidru's Avatar
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    Thanks for the suggestions. I just wasn't sure if I was supposed to use pressure yet. I tried distracting with a second bumper and she was interested, but still didn't want to drop the first one. I do use "drop" with each time I take the bumper.

    Thanks for the tip on teething, because she did already loose one of her K9's I had switch from paint rollers to soft canvas bumpers. If I notice an issue, I'll switch back.

  9. #9
    Senior Member TroyFeeken's Avatar
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    The recommendation of the flap between the belly and hind legs is what I prefer. Keeping your fingers away from those sharp little teeth! Encourage a good hold though without grabbing for the bumper or toy you're using.
    Cody's Gunslingin' Cosmonaut MH (Shooter)

  10. #10
    Senior Member KwickLabs's Avatar
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    The request for tips on how have a pup release a retrieve. The usual "make it a bit uncomfortable" (in a variety of ways) have been offered up.

    Let's establish a little perspective to the situation. First, most pups are excited about the retrieve and aren't too concerned about your motivation. It's fun and their instincts are often working overtime plus no "rules" have been established. Therefore, it has been suggested "the little bugger" will need to be distracted with something uncomfortable. The essence of this type of lesson involves a "bad ending". Oh, one can be gentle about it but there is no getting around the effect of a pinched lip or flank pull.

    What fails in this presentation is the teacher is not maximizing the opportunity. Early pups thrive on predictable, fair fun. What is done with a pup early on impacts what happens later. Pinching gums or pulling flanks will not enhance responsiveness.

    Here's an excerpt from the early part of an explanation about teaching remote drop.

    "The dog now will deliver by waiting for me to take a hold of a wing or leg of a bird so that on "drop" the bird falls down away from the dog (just like with the string on a bumper). In no way am I actually taking the bird or bumper from the dog’s mouth. The expectation is "open mouth and let it fall out" on command (taught during early training)...............Make this a very slow, deliberate, calm and precise sequence. Often, how one receives the bumper or bird back from the dog is more important than the drill we are doing. For a high drive dog this is especially significant."

    What I'm suggesting is that when a pup comes back with his prize allow him to settle down, keep it for awhile and begin to establish his responsiveness towards you....to the point of "OK, let's do that again.....take this bumper....I don't need it anymore." Most puppy trainers just can't hardly wait to get that bumper back to "do another retrieve" and yet most puppies don't understand this is necessary (until it becomes an understood part of a routine).

    Work slowly. Allow the puppy to calm down to the point of acknowledging that you are actually there. Once he discovers you are happy, pleasant, calm and patient he will "come down", respond and give up his prize. This calm, easy approach will become an expectation.

    How easy this will be will depends on the animation of the pup and your ability to control your needs to "get on with it". To repeat "how you get the bumper or bird back from a pup is more important than the retrieve." It is better to receive than take.

    What's the rush?
    Last edited by KwickLabs; 03-11-2014 at 03:30 PM.
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