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Thread: Too Many Trials, Too Few Judges?

  1. #61
    Junior Member russhardy's Avatar
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    Point taken. But how do you think we should encourage more folks to judge and become competent?

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    Senior Member Ted Shih's Avatar
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    There are days when I agree with you, John.
    There are other days when I agree with you, Russ.
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    Senior Member huntinman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Shih View Post
    There are days when I agree with you, John.
    There are other days when I agree with you, Russ.
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  4. #64
    Senior Member John Robinson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by russhardy View Post
    Point taken. But how do you think we should encourage more folks to judge and become competent?
    First Bill cracks me up...

    To answer your question I think the best way is for the individuals that are in position to choose judges keep their eyes out for young blood. Those relative newcomers with maybe their first good all age dog who seem to get it. Let's face it even new comers are probably near fifty. You can tell by training with them, who the smart, hard workers are. Nurture them, take them under your wing, discuss bird placement in test during training, point out good and bad test at trials, discuss field trial mechanics, show them how to judge, then pair them up with good mentor type old judge. I was lucky to have great mentor co-judges who made sure that I was equal when it came to judging dogs. They took my ideas on setting up test seriously with a tweak here or there, showed me more about mechanics, and trial by trial taught me to be a judge.

    John

  5. #65
    Senior Member Ted Shih's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Robinson View Post
    First Bill cracks me up...

    To answer your question I think the best way is for the individuals that are in position to choose judges keep their eyes out for young blood. Those relative newcomers with maybe their first good all age dog who seem to get it. Let's face it even new comers are probably near fifty. You can tell by training with them, who the smart, hard workers are. Nurture them, take them under your wing, discuss bird placement in test during training, point out good and bad test at trials, discuss field trial mechanics, show them how to judge, then pair them up with good mentor type old judge. I was lucky to have great mentor co-judges who made sure that I was equal when it came to judging dogs. They took my ideas on setting up test seriously with a tweak here or there, showed me more about mechanics, and trial by trial taught me to be a judge.

    John

    This would work if there was "young" or "new" blood entering in significant numbers. But, there isn't.
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  6. #66
    Senior Member Breck's Avatar
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    the coefficient of inbreeding within field trial judging is beyond the point of acceptance.
    To further the idea Ted & Ed presented to reduce AA entries I believe there may be a path to a solution for lack of availabe judges.
    Just as there are requirements for a dog to Qualify there could be implimentation of a rule to limit a person to entering X field trial entries where that number would be reset once an AA assigment is completed. For sake of argument lets start with 25 entry credits per Judging assignment. For those no cutout for judging maybe 2 three day marshalling assignments or something could be equilivant to 1 judging assignment.
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    Senior Member Scott Adams's Avatar
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    The field trial game in USA is doing itself a great disservice by not allowing pro's to judge. The quality of tests and mentoring would increase dramatically. Pro trainers judge here in Canada, and it only helps our game. I am not aware of any conflict that has arisen with pros judging here. Our judging pool is tiny compared to AKC.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Shih View Post

    This would work if there was "young" or "new" blood entering in significant numbers. But, there isn't.
    I have a "young fellow" who trains with us on a regular basis for the past eight years. He now has a all-age dog that needs a win to title both ways, FC and /or AFC. He started judging all-age stakes about two years ago and now has 14 major points. Did two in Florida this year. He works hard trains his own dogs and I judged an Open with him early last year. He has learned fast and well. Comes from the HRC and AKC hunt test game, finished a Grand and a Master National with two different dogs. Has placed a dog on the National Derby list and beside the pointed all-age dog has another qualified all-age dog. He works a full-time job, is personable and friendly. He sets up sound tests in training and at trials. He is 53 years old! Now the profile of a judge is some of the things mentioned above needed to get asked to judge major stakes.
    He has been mentored well I agree, most in our group are eight point judges (or working towards it), including a 100 plus. It aint easy folks but if you want to judge those are some of the hoops you have to jump through as an example.

    As Ted indicated this is the new blood and he was almost 50 years old when he judged his first major stake something to think about. He has high credentials for judging. Just some thoughts.
    Last edited by Criquetpas; 04-05-2014 at 11:56 AM.
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  9. #69
    Senior Member John Robinson's Avatar
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    Good story Earl, just the kind of person I'm talking about. In our sport the terms young and new are relative. The young people I'm talking about are 50ish, early retirees how finally have the time and resources to train and campaign a dog or two. I started in hunt test back in my early 40s, hunt test were viable for a working guy to train a few days after work and a day over the weekend. I got my first field trial dog when I was 45, but had to use a pro. My wife and I would throw birds for the pro on Saturday or Sunday and we slowly learned the field trial game. I think of a 40ish field trial person as being very young for our sport.

    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Robinson View Post
    Good story Earl, just the kind of person I'm talking about. In our sport the terms young and new are relative. The young people I'm talking about are 50ish, early retirees how finally have the time and resources to train and campaign a dog or two. I started in hunt test back in my early 40s, hunt test were viable for a working guy to train a few days after work and a day over the weekend. I got my first field trial dog when I was 45, but had to use a pro. My wife and I would throw birds for the pro on Saturday or Sunday and we slowly learned the field trial game. I think of a 40ish field trial person as being very young for our sport.

    John
    Your correct John. I forget sometimes on young vrs old. I was a mere 19 or 20 years old and fumbled around for nearly 20 years as a basically bird boy, grunt, gopher , for a bunch of "serious dog trainers", and didn't have anything competitive until I was in my early 40's . So young is relative .
    Earl Dillow

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