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Thread: Texas people do you know about this disease?Chagas

  1. #11
    Senior Member rboudet's Avatar
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    It is just as common here as it is in Texas.

  2. #12
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    I am very familiar with this! I currently have a dog in training that has Chagas. We are working with a vet (Dr. Madigan) in Spring Branch, TX. He is doing a study on this disease and has a very large success rate of saving the dog. So far the dog is doing very well and she just got her JH Title this past weekend.

  3. #13
    Senior Member kelrobin's Avatar
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    Aren't these bugs capable of flying? If so, then I don't see where spreading DE around the kennel would help.

  4. #14
    Senior Member EdA's Avatar
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    they are beetles (Triatomines) and incapable of flight

    http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/chagas/gen_info/vectors/
    Last edited by EdA; 05-09-2014 at 04:23 PM.

  5. #15
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    Super post Dr. Ed. Thank you.

  6. #16
    Senior Member bakbay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdA View Post
    they are beetles (Triatomines) and incapable of flight

    http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/chagas/gen_info/vectors/
    One of my training partners lost a dog to Chagas several years ago and has elected to test both his current dogs regularly by having blood sent to Texas A&M to ensure that, if they contract Chagas, he can begin treatment in a more timely fashion. We rely on keeping our dogs inside at night and limiting outdoor lighting to reduce attraction.

    The adult stage does have wings and is capable of flight, all other stages of the "kissing bug" are wingless (as stated on the CDC website "immature stages of the bug (wingless, smaller nymphs)".

    Wikipedia has more information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triatominae, as do many other websites, including, the following from the University of Arizona, Department of Neuroscience, http://neurosci.arizona.edu/kissingbugs/basicfacts.

    The World Health Organization has a publication, Chapter 3 of which covers Triatomine bugs and methods of control, http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_...or210to222.pdf
    Bruce Bachert Bakbay Labradors
    beb@bakbay.com www.bakbay.com
    Creedmoor, TX (near Austin)

  7. #17
    Senior Member Jay Dufour's Avatar
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    Dr. Lane Foil Etimology Professor at LSU indicated 50% malathion sprayed around kennels,and down into spaces between slab and grass.We do it every other week.There is worlds of info on this by google.

  8. #18
    Senior Member wheelhorse's Avatar
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    What I've read about it, it can be treated for a short while, but the cardiac effects always catch up.
    Kathleen

    "Before you diagnose yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you're not, in fact, just surrounded by a**holes" -William Gibson

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