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Thread: Pigeons: Health Related Risks

  1. #1
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    Default Pigeons: Health Related Risks

    After reading some older post on RTF, I have learned of a few instances where dogs became ill from contact with pigeons—most likely the result of some disease being transmitted from pigeon droppings. Are these rare cases, or is this a common problem associated with using pigeons? Have any of you that use pigeons in your training routine experienced similar problems? Do the benefits (cost/convenience) outweigh the risks (illness) related to using pigeons?

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    Senior Member Mike Tome's Avatar
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    Thousands and thousands of pigeons are used for training without issue. The benefits significantly outweigh the risks.

    People die in car crashes every day. Have you stopped driving a car?
    Mike Tome
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    Senior Member sdnordahl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Tome View Post
    Thousands and thousands of pigeons are used for training without issue. The benefits significantly outweigh the risks.

    People die in car crashes every day. Have you stopped driving a car?
    What he said.
    Steven

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  4. #4

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    what about pigeons caught inside of a city? I know a guy who catches pigeons for the city of Dallas and uses them with his retriever

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    Senior Member PennyRetrievers's Avatar
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    Ha. I've got a buddy who takes them home at eats them after we're done training with them!
    "Somehow this creature has completed my manhood; somehow, I cannot explain why, a man ought to have a dog. A man ought to have six legs; those other four legs are part of him." -G.K. Chesterton

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    Senior Member Ken Bora's Avatar
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    welcome to the RTF "T"
    most wild trapped birds are fine. some couped birds can get a bit nasty.
    that is on the coup owner. You need to keep your birds coups and water clean.
    most folks try and give as good a life as they are able, afore they toss them into the air and shoot them.
    "So what is big is not always the Trout nor the Deer but the chance, the being there. And what is full is not necessarily the creel nor the freezer, but the memory." ~ Aldo Leopold

    "The Greatest Obstacle to Discovery is not Ignorance -- It is the Illusion of Knowledge" ~ Daniel Boorstin

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    Having been a competitive racing pigeon competitor in my earlier years the past twenty years have brought forth a whole new range of avian diseases. I raise and keep my own pigeons out of high grade racing stock. My first rule is to NOT introduce strange birds from unknown lofts. They bring disease. You now have to vaccinate your birds and provide proof of it to fly AU events. By keeping my loft closed , I have no problems aside from keeping it clean w/proper ventilation. My dogs enjoy the constant interaction w/live birds each and every day. Absolutely needed for puppies/young dogs.

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    Senior Member DoubleHaul's Avatar
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    I would be way more worried about what one might get from ducks--especially on Sunday afternoon.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by swliszka View Post
    Having been a competitive racing pigeon competitor in my earlier years the past twenty years have brought forth a whole new range of avian diseases. I raise and keep my own pigeons out of high grade racing stock. My first rule is to NOT introduce strange birds from unknown lofts. They bring disease. You now have to vaccinate your birds and provide proof of it to fly AU events. By keeping my loft closed , I have no problems aside from keeping it clean w/proper ventilation. My dogs enjoy the constant interaction w/live birds each and every day. Absolutely needed for puppies/young dogs.
    Can you tell me anything that will make me less clueless about my pigeons. I bought four roller pigeons and they started laying eggs and I didn't want to use those with my puppy because they were sitting on eggs.

    I ordered four more so I would have some to work with. I've got one Homer pigeon for variety and to see how much bigger it would be. Mine are really picky eaters and they seem to constantly be bickering with one another. I'm a little afraid to ask any bird people because I think they might get uncivil with me using them with a puppy. I've got two babies that look like they are going to make it.

  10. #10
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    Their bickering is probably due to female/male bird ratios. They also establish a territorial and alpha order. They fight sometimes w/in sexes for dominance. I feed them wild bird seed cheaper than racing pigeon feed but make sure they have plenty of grit. If your loft is too small that can cause space competition. Makes sure they have a fly /exercise area predator proof to their shelter/loft area. Rollers and homers coexist well but space is the issue. Too many birds for a space = disease/fights. !7-18 days for eggs from laid to hatch. Squeakers another 5 weeks before hardy. Sometimes non-parental birds will attack the squeakers in their nest area if parents are not present. Additionally when squeakers do not have a perch to get on , they can be attacked by older birds who love to pick the top of their heads, sometimes leading to death. Once you get your own strain going do not mix so as to prevent health issues.

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