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Thread: isolate steadyness or just part of training quality marks?

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    Default isolate steadyness or just part of training quality marks?

    I was wondering if you guys taught steadiness while working on marks as part of your strict standards, or if you isolated the concept with some sort of drill?
    I run tests to prepare my huntin Buddy To HUNT, If a hunting dog cant RECOVER A CRIPPLE its just another test Dog!!!
    McNew River Bottom Dixie JH

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    Senior Member fishduck's Avatar
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    Teach in the yard. Standard is zero movement. Then take that standard to the field.

    The trap is not upholding standards when group training because you are "wasting time". Dog learned steadiness is required in the yard but not in the field. Don't ask how I know
    Mark Land

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    Senior Member Kirk Keene's Avatar
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    I feel "steadiness" is a continuation of "sit", and teach it as thus. Our pups are taught the "sit" command at a very young age (meaning "sit" means "sit") using food and treats. This transfers easily into the field if done correctly. They have a basic understanding of what we term "steadiness", as they know they will not be allowed their reward (be it a treat or a bumper) if they fail to remain seated until released. They're gradually introduced to increasing distractions while they sit, such as bumpers pitched around them or another dog heeled nearby. By the time we're starting actual marking drills in the field, steadiness has been ingrained.

    I currently have two seven-month old littermates doing basic marking drills. This morning, I ran both on stand-alones in the hayfield and only had one attempt to break. She was placed back at the original sitting position and I picked up the mark. We then did some heel and sit work before going back to stand-alones with no further issue.

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    Isolated yard drill,
    How The West was Won ( Colt)
    Delilahs Addicted to Mischief ( Delilah) My Jammin little girl
    Extreme Dixies Rebel Yell ( Dixie ) JH
    Dawsons Little Sable (Sable) 12 /08 - 5/14 , We'll hunt again someday girl.

    St. Thomas, the great doctor and theologian, warns about the proper use of animals, lest they appear at the final Judgment against us: and God himself will take vengeance on all who misuse his creatures.

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    Senior Member Peter G Lippert's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Keene View Post
    I feel "steadiness" is a continuation of "sit", and teach it as thus. Our pups are taught the "sit" command at a very young age (meaning "sit" means "sit") using food and treats. This transfers easily into the field if done correctly. They have a basic understanding of what we term "steadiness", as they know they will not be allowed their reward (be it a treat or a bumper) if they fail to remain seated until released. They're gradually introduced to increasing distractions while they sit, such as bumpers pitched around them or another dog heeled nearby. By the time we're starting actual marking drills in the field, steadiness has been ingrained.

    I currently have two seven-month old littermates doing basic marking drills. This morning, I ran both on stand-alones in the hayfield and only had one attempt to break. She was placed back at the original sitting position and I picked up the mark. We then did some heel and sit work before going back to stand-alones with no further issue.
    ^This. So many things are tens times easier if you have a good sit on a dog. I think the same holds true for heel as well.

    To answer your question though, in my experience steadiness is or needs to be taught and needs to be kept as a strict standard in the yard, while running marks, while trianing with a group, during a test, while hunting etc. My dog is steady all day long in the yard and during marks but breaks down sometimes when training with a group and when the feather start flying. As a result of this during hunting in the beginning of the season I make sure to hunt with a group of good shooters that wya I can put my gun down and do some steadiness work with the pup in a real hunting situation. This helps send the message that the standard of steadiness is the same there as in the yard.

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    Senior Member Nate_C's Avatar
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    With a young dog I would never correct them too hard at the line. I use a training tab at first and if they move I give them a little tug and say SIT even after yard work for a little while until they get it. If it is really bad, I will take them back to the yard and do a steadiness drill (have someone through multiple marks from abut 25 yards. I have a 10 foot rope in case they really break and correct the dog with a heeling stick. After awhile when I taking they understand what is expected then I will let go of the training tab and use the stick again. If they creep then I take them off the line.

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    Senior Member RookieTrainer's Avatar
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    Amen, and amen.

    Quote Originally Posted by fishduck View Post
    Teach in the yard. Standard is zero movement. Then take that standard to the field.

    The trap is not upholding standards when group training because you are "wasting time". Dog learned steadiness is required in the yard but not in the field. Don't ask how I know
    Steve Wyatt

    HR Belle's Rolling Big Rig "Jimmy"

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    Ok my view: there are 3 types of retrievers
    Them that have broke, them about to break and those you dont want!

    Every mark they dont break is one closer to the one they will!
    It never happens at a good time

    A lot of folks steady a dog to soon and they are all different.
    Hold a high standard and expect them to do as taught

    If they do break at an event : as an accomplished trainer once said
    " go ahead and dont give those B#%%,€ 's a chance to judge you!
    My view
    Dk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Kress View Post
    Ok my view: there are 3 types of retrievers
    Them that have broke, them about to break and those you dont want!

    Every mark they dont break is one closer to the one they will!
    It never happens at a good time

    A lot of folks steady a dog to soon and they are all different.
    Hold a high standard and expect them to do as taught

    If they do break at an event : as an accomplished trainer once said
    " go ahead and dont give those B#%%,€ 's a chance to judge you!
    My view
    Dk
    I was told about the same thing last weekend after my dog that I had 8/10 confidence
    Going into test Would sit. He said there's two types dogs that are broke, and dogs that will break. Which I feel is pretty decent advice. And I do think now that I prob shouldn't have beenpushing my 6& 1/2 month old pup and expecting her to run in a hunter level NAHRA test. But its too late and iI didn't get her stopped before she got the go bird. I'm a beleaver in always keeping a high standard. And if they flinch no bird back to the holding blind. I'm about done with walking fetch and will be collar conditioning soon. But my real question was aimed at getting some new ideas on small drill to reinforce steadyness not as a command but as a dissaplend(sp)
    I run tests to prepare my huntin Buddy To HUNT, If a hunting dog cant RECOVER A CRIPPLE its just another test Dog!!!
    McNew River Bottom Dixie JH

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    Post 9 - 6 1/2 months is pretty young so be careful

    There is a steadying drill that we use but remember we are amateurs and not even close to accomplished trainers

    Sit the dog in front of you and your 10' or so away, after you have her attention toss the bumper over your shoulder, when pup stays step out of the way and release Increase the distance and make noise as pup progresses.
    Lengthen your throws and increase your noise as pup progresses. Work toward standing in front of pup with a toss sideways. Use a small mat for a locator, tolerance should stay on the mat
    No more fun bumpers till this lesson of steady is learned.
    Have fun and keep your lessons short. Pup is just a baby

    All pups/people are different and as an example we are just steadying an 17 month old rocket ship.
    Good luck and have fun
    Dk

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