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Thread: Flash aggression, Lab

  1. #31
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    It is your decision and a tough one (I know from experience and have posted on here about it and my decision in the end.)
    Don't let your guard down just because the kids/grandkids are not around. It can happen to you also!!
    Your story sounds just like mine a little over a year ago.

  2. #32
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    When Kwicklabs said this: "A month later, I suddenly realized just how much emotional energy was being expended every "freeking" single day for years to "manage" the situation. The atmosphere in our house has change dramatically...especially for me. The other three dogs are very much more relaxed now since they don't have to always be looking to maintain the proper distance. I should mention that every single time the four went out to air I was in the yard "supervising" which is just another word for "managing"." It really resonated with me.

    I used to have a very aggressive rat terrier that I had to "manage" in a similar manner. He was dog aggressive, and people aggressive (though not me and my husband or our trusted friends, so we just thought he was a good guard dog). When out for a walk on leash, I had to literally pick him up snarling and snapping if there was another dog walking anywhere within 40 feet of us. I would often get nipped in the process. He also bit anyone he didn't like and the muzzle was necessary in certain situations. People thought it was a novelty, because he was small, and no one figured he could actually do much damage to them.

    Fast forward to when we had kids, with our first child, our rat terrier was perfect. He loved our son and never ever showed signs of aggression with him. Our next child, he didn't like, for no visible reason. While he was a baby and crawling nearby, I caught the dog growling at him more than once, and it became a very stressful ordeal to keep him away from the baby, a baby who had never touched him or hit him or bothered him ever, because he was too small to do any of those things.

    We had to have the vet put him to sleep before our 2nd child was 1 year old. He had canine epilepsy that had progressed and his quality of life had really deteriorated. I feel bad to admit this, but I missed him, but more than sadness, there was a feeling of relief that came from not having to watch him like a hawk and worry constantly.

    I realize that your situation is very different, but I wanted to echo what Kwicklabs said. There is an emotional/stress toll that comes from constantly managing a dog like this. It can sneak up on you and really build. Be aware of that and try to combat it. I also think that the NILIF (nothing in life is free) concept would've gone a long way to manage our rat terrier's aggression. It may have really helped the situation. Try not to feel guilty if you eventually do choose to re-home him into a safer household, or even make the choice to put him to sleep. It is a really stressful situation, for everyone involved, including the dog, and sometimes it's the best decision.

  3. #33
    Senior Member kelrobin's Avatar
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    I cannot offer you suggestions but I did want to tell you I'm sorry you have to deal with this.
    ​Laura

    Can Ch UGRCH URO2 SHR Kelrobin Black Minx RN JH CD WC CGC BN Can RN PCD CGN WC CD

  4. #34
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    .
    Any aggression towards people ,especially children puts people at risk in your household. A neighbor's house pet and hunting dog bite his son 's face and deformed the child for life. There
    is no place for an aggressive dog in a family..

  5. #35
    Senior Member pupaloo's Avatar
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    A muzzle will physically prevent a bite, but it can cause problems, too. Be sure to read up on the proper use of a muzzle with an aggressive dog-won't help if the dog comes to hate or fear the muzzle and bites you when you try to put it on....
    Marlana Smith
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    An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

  6. #36
    Senior Member JusticeDog's Avatar
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    Some dogs actually feel more relaxed with a muzzle on.... And there should be a conditioning process ie: building up wearing tolerance. If there is a physical issue i personally don't deem a dog aggressive, although I don't believe they are trustworthy either. A bad ear can be very painful to a dog. Just like a bad tooth can be painful to a human. I personally would be concerned with the ear if a dog has gotten ear infections in the past and determine if a food allergy is the cause or something else. I think donna is making the right move for her and her family at this point in time. You can always reassess at a later point in time. After all, euthanasia is permanent.
    Last edited by JusticeDog; 07-04-2014 at 07:31 PM.
    Susan

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  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by kelrobin View Post
    I cannot offer you suggestions but I did want to tell you I'm sorry you have to deal with this.
    I have kept up with this thread and would like to share the same as this quote, very sorry for the situation you have to deal with

  8. #38
    Senior Member Henlee's Avatar
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    Donna your inbox is full.
    During break time at obedience school, two dogs were talking.
    One said to the other..."The thing I hate about obedience school is you learn ALL this stuff you will never use in the real world."

  9. #39
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    There is no second chances when it comes to kids. Get rid of the dog period, put him down or give him away. Next time you might not be so lucky and it be a lot worse. Or next time it may be someone else's child that gets bit and depending on the parents you may have one heck of a problem on your hands. Thank about what is safer............. He may never bite or show aggression again, BUT then again he might.

  10. #40
    Senior Member Henlee's Avatar
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    It is not so cut and dry, the dog had not displayed human aggression before this point and was even considered sweet. There is also the medical issue, which even in the best dogs could be a trigger for an incident. There is not enough information in this post to just give up on the dog. I would monitor the dog and develop a plan for the dog aggression.
    During break time at obedience school, two dogs were talking.
    One said to the other..."The thing I hate about obedience school is you learn ALL this stuff you will never use in the real world."

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