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Thread: functional anatomy?

  1. #1
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    Default functional anatomy?

    I think I may be asking the same questions again and again, I blame it on old age (37). This could be such a question, not sure:

    What is a functional anatomy for a retriever? Why?

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    Senior Member Ken Bora's Avatar
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    like for example, it the head too blocky and square to be able to pick up a duck? Is the coat and under coat proper for a water dog? stuff like that.
    "So what is big is not always the Trout nor the Deer but the chance, the being there. And what is full is not necessarily the creel nor the freezer, but the memory." ~ Aldo Leopold

    "The Greatest Obstacle to Discovery is not Ignorance -- It is the Illusion of Knowledge" ~ Daniel Boorstin

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Bora
    like for example, it the head too blocky and square to be able to pick up a duck? Is the coat and under coat proper for a water dog? stuff like that.

    well no, more the pure skeleton and construction.

  4. #4
    Melanie Foster
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    Degree of angulation in the front and in the rear should be similar to maximize movement (i.e., trotting or running) with minimal effort.

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    Senior Member Latisha's Avatar
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    This was asked about two years ago. The topic didn't get much reaction then either.
    http://retrievertraining.net/forums/...ic.php?t=17732

    I am still pretty comfortable with the list I made. I think the only thing I would add to it is a strong, but flexible, back. I like Aussie's comment about dogs that glide.

    One thing I have learned about conformation in the past 2 years, is that it is more than just length of bones, angulation, and an effortless gait. It is also about strength and weakness. For instance, a dog may have its bones in all the right places, but if the tendons and ligaments are weak, or the muscles not in condition, the animal is not going to use its whole body efficiently. The whole body should be strong with no inherent weakness.

    Latisha

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    Quote Originally Posted by Latisha
    This was asked about two years ago. The topic didn't get much reaction then either.
    http://retrievertraining.net/forums/...ic.php?t=17732

    I am still pretty comfortable with the list I made. I think the only thing I would add to it is a strong, but flexible, back. I like Aussie's comment about dogs that glide.

    One thing I have learned about conformation in the past 2 years, is that it is more than just length of bones, angulation, and an effortless gait. It is also about strength and weakness. For instance, a dog may have its bones in all the right places, but if the tendons and ligaments are weak, or the muscles not in condition, the animal is not going to use its whole body efficiently. The whole body should be strong with no inherent weakness.

    Latisha

    Thanks!!!!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Melanie Foster
    Degree of angulation in the front and in the rear should be similar to maximize movement (i.e., trotting or running) with minimal effort.
    Thanks!!!!!

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    One thing I am wondering about is the size and depth of the chest. Is the stamina and ability to work for a long time enhanced by a large chest? Does the chest need to be big for a dog to have large lungs?

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    Have to comment on this line in the posted link:

    "The original standards describe the ideal hunting-retriever of that time, which I would wager was more like the meat dogs of today."


    I don't know what the US bred FT lab look like but here in Europe the FT Labs and FT Goldens are more similar to the original historical type:

    Check out some historical Labs in this blog, furthest down:

    http://kennelmeadowlark.blogspot.com...1_archive.html

    Historical Goldens:

    http://www.thegoldenretrieverclub.co...ry%20page.html

    http://www.slav-trophy.ru/publik_foss3.htm

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    Senior Member ErinsEdge's Avatar
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    It looks to be like your dogs of old look like our dogs of old and the way many of our field dogs look, but certainly US bench dogs have changed dramatically to what they interpret as "form follows function" which invariably initiates great debate in that we say form follows actual performance. The pictures say it all, and wonderful ones I might add.
    Nancy P



    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

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