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Thread: "Back" or "Name" to Send on a Mark?

  1. #1
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    Default "Back" or "Name" to Send on a Mark?

    I've gotten mixed input from what I've read so I thought I'd just ask myself. I see some people use "back" to send a dog on a mark, others only use it for a blind and use the dog's name to send on a mark. We are following Hillmann and I believe that Bill uses "back" with the pups in his video.

    Is there any right or wrong? I've read enough to be confused but need to make a decision and stick with it since we are getting into it now in training.

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    Senior Member mitty's Avatar
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    Say you got your 2 dogs in the duck blind with you. You shoot a duck, and now its time for one of the dogs to retrieve it. Which one's gonna go when you say "back"?
    Last edited by mitty; 06-09-2015 at 09:04 AM. Reason: typo
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    Senior Member captainjack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitty View Post
    Sag you got your 2 dogs in the duck blind with you. You shoot a duck, and now its time for one of the dogs to retrieve it. Which one's gonna go when you say "back"?
    The one with your hand over his head.
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    Senior Member captainjack's Avatar
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    No right or wrong but using back for blinds & name for marks is more common in the HT & FT games than using back on both. It's one more thing the handler can do to communicate with the dog. When I say back, my dogs know that I'm driving, when I call their name, they know they are on their own. This is a benefit IMO.
    Glen Guider, GA
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    HRCH UH Gandy's Ready for a Hurricane "Maggie" MH QA2
    Red Squad's Blue on Black "Jesse" MH QA2
    SML's Burn Notice "Fiona"
    Red Squad's Randall Raines "Memphis"

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    Senior Member sunnydee's Avatar
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    Whether you are hunting in a duck blind or running your dog in competitions being a team player will greatly improve your chances of success. As one half of the team it is your job to teach your dog certain cue words that will help them understand what you want them to do. Here is an example, and you could see this example while hunting or in competition. You see three ducks coming into your decoys and you might cue your dog by saying mark letting him know to get ready. It's a good day so you knock all three of them down, two of them are stone dead right out in front of you and the third one landed in the tules on the other side of the pond and could be paddling away. If you don't get the one in the tules first you could lose it forever. Your dog is now concentrating on one of the ducks right out in front of him and you want him to refocus on the duck he can't see. You might re-heel him to help break his concentration and then cue him by saying (dead bird), that is letting him know that you are wanting him to run a blind. You send him on the word (back) which again let him know what you want him to do. As he is coming back with the blind retrieve you might cue him by using the words (where's your mark) and then sending him on his name, you have now told him in two different ways that you want him now to pick up the marks. The better that you and your dog can learn to communicate with each other the better team you're going to be.
    Terry C.

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    Senior Member Cass's Avatar
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    Name = mark
    Back = blind

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    I've changed the way I work names and "back".

    For the last ten years or so I've been picking up with two, three or four dogs on big driven shoots; by big I mean anything up to six hundred bird days. Multiplying two, three or four x six hundred x Murphy's Constant gives a lot of opportunities for things to go wrong and sometimes they have, the name command being one of them. because of the potential for confusion, bearing in mind the dogs aren't always by my side but could be 20 yards away, I now use the name simply as an attention getter

    Typical situation ........ there are a couple of dead birds lying sixty yards to our front that the dog(s) have marked, but a pricked bird well out to our right, not marked by the dogs has pitched into cover well behind us; that's the one we want. If I use the dogs name as a send out command, I'm going to get the dead birds retrieved, and allow the cripple to move on. I need to get the attention of one of them, turn him through 120 degrees and give the blind command. So now it's "Jack", to get his attention and leave the other dog(s) where they are, "here," come to the cast off position, and "fetch it" for taking a blind.

    I find this way I get fewer false starts than the way I did things previously using the conventional system.

    If working multiple Mutts on multiple falls isn't on your particular horizon, then convention is fine; if it is however it's worth a ponderisation.

    Eug
    Last edited by Colonel Blimp; 06-08-2015 at 11:11 AM.
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    Eug, those of us who do other competitive dog sports pretty much always use the name as an attention getter, preceding the actual command. Hence, in field we tend to send on a command like "take it" etc. rather than on the name.

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    If you always send on back- no one really has any idea what dog you are running at any given moment... Which in a certain context could be perceived as an advantage....

    Some top competitors always send on back. Rational being that it helps avoid no-go's- and there are other cues that let the dog know if they are runnin a mark or a blind

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    Senior Member polmaise's Avatar
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    I'm thinking of using the command 'Scooby Do' when sending the dog ? Just to be different
    Seriously , it shouldn't matter what command/release word is used in whatever situation as long as the dog or (dog's) understand what you are conveying.

    Eug , rightly relates to a situation I am familiar with and if that works then fine.

    In competition working in a 'Brace' situation with two handlers and a dog with each handler standing side by side which is often the case in our games. If each dog has been trained to be released on a mark with the command 'back' then that could result in a race ..or the very worst ...elimination !
    Therefore Captainjack's post #3 is very relevant !.It may have been 'Tongue in cheek' comment, But in the situation or situations with those in the field working multiple dogs under a single handler it also adds an additional part of a process that each dog relates to ( It) ..Or Not.
    One Shooter One Spaniel One Retriever

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