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Thread: Your lightening guidelines????

  1. #1
    Senior Member Ken Bora's Avatar
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    Default Your lightening guidelines????

    Set up the field this afternoon with the training group. Nice dry land set up with holding blinds (metal stakes) bumper boys, zinger wingers ( all with stick men, rebar driven into ground with wire coat hangers) Just as we got everything in place a pop up thunder storm rolled across the lake. We took cover in the guys work shop and drank beer. Quick as it rolled in, it rolled out. Rain stopped and to the north the sun came out. We could still see the storm, see the lightening are hear the thunder. But we were dry. We sat in the shop and drank more beer and remembered Sandy Sonntag. When she was struck at West Thompson, Ct. a few years back we lost a great person in the dog community and in the world. Finally it got to late to do anything, and we were out of beer. Did we waste the afternoon? Should we have gone out right after the rain stopped? What are your personal guidelines regarding lightening? It is the time of year for it.
    Ken Bora
    "So what is big is not always the Trout nor the Deer but the chance, the being there. And what is full is not necessarily the creel nor the freezer, but the memory." ~ Aldo Leopold

    "The Greatest Obstacle to Discovery is not Ignorance -- It is the Illusion of Knowledge" ~ Daniel Boorstin

  2. #2
    Kristie Wilder
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    If you can see lightening, you stop training. Period... I know some folks, and even at tests, where people keep going. I won't run. I ran ONCE when the storm had moved off for a second. double went down, my poor dog couldn't see anything as the storm picked back up. I tried to run the blind, she couldn't see me. I picked her up and they didn't offer to rerun her, but I was so mad that I ran in lightening that i wanted to kick myself. I will NEVER do that again... It was STUPID.

    Never mind that I picked her up, shouldn't have been there in the first place.

    I remember the story about the lady in Connecticut and I share that with people when storms come up and they wonder why I don't want to run. That is a terrible tragedy with her husband there to witness it, from what I understand... There's nothing that needs to be done so badly that it's worth the risk. and the odds are slim to none, but tell that to her and her family...

    -K

  3. #3
    Senior Member jeff t.'s Avatar
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    I find it impossible to focus when worried about getting hit by lightning.

    If we hear thunder, we stop training until we no longer hear thunder.

    When I was a kid growing up in Daytona, they taught us the 30/30 rule

    From http://www.srh.noaa.gov/jetstream/li...ing_safety.htm




    The 30/30 rule
    Any lightning safety plan should incorporate the 30/30 Rule. The 30/30 Rule states that people should seek shelter if the "Flash-To-Bang" delay (length of time in seconds between a lightning flash and its subsequent thunder), is 30 seconds or less, and that they remain under cover until 30 minutes after the final clap of thunder.

    A 30 second lead time is necessary prior to a storm's arrival because of the possibility of distant strikes. A 30 minute wait after the last thunder is heard is necessary because the trailing storm clouds still carry a lingering charge. This charge can and does occasionally produce lightning on the back edge of a storm, several minutes after the rain has ended.

    Studies have shown most people struck by lightning are struck not at the height of a thunderstorm, but before and after the storm has peaked. This shows many people are unaware of how far lightning can strike from its parent thunderstorm. DO NOT wait for the rain to start before seeking shelter, and do not leave shelter just because the rain has ended.



    I feel the same responsibility when I am marshalling at a trial. I don't want the bird boys exposed to a risk that I will not accept for myself.
    Jeff Telander
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Bubba's Avatar
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    Never pass up the opportunity to drink beer with friends.

    Ya did good regards

    Bubba
    There are three classes of people: those who see...those who see when shown...and those who do not see. - Leonardo da Vinci

  5. #5
    Kristie Wilder
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff t.
    I find it impossible to focus when worried about getting hit by lightning.

    If we hear thunder, we stop training until we no longer hear thunder.

    When I was a kid growing up in Daytona, they taught us the 30/30 rule

    From http://www.srh.noaa.gov/jetstream/li...ing_safety.htm




    The 30/30 rule
    Any lightning safety plan should incorporate the 30/30 Rule. The 30/30 Rule states that people should seek shelter if the "Flash-To-Bang" delay (length of time in seconds between a lightning flash and its subsequent thunder), is 30 seconds or less, and that they remain under cover until 30 minutes after the final clap of thunder.

    A 30 second lead time is necessary prior to a storm's arrival because of the possibility of distant strikes. A 30 minute wait after the last thunder is heard is necessary because the trailing storm clouds still carry a lingering charge. This charge can and does occasionally produce lightning on the back edge of a storm, several minutes after the rain has ended.

    Studies have shown most people struck by lightning are struck not at the height of a thunderstorm, but before and after the storm has peaked. This shows many people are unaware of how far lightning can strike from its parent thunderstorm. DO NOT wait for the rain to start before seeking shelter, and do not leave shelter just because the rain has ended.



    I feel the same responsibility when I am marshalling at a trial. I don't want the bird boys exposed to a risk that I will not accept for myself.
    That's great to know. I had never heard of it. Thanks for sharing.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Steve Amrein's Avatar
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    As a so called lightning survivor I am much more aware and nervous when thunder and lightning are around nothing to take for granted.

    Prolly not a good Idea to sit next to me in the truck and ride it out either.
    "Communism only works in Heaven, where they don't need it, and in Hell, where they already have it" Ronald Reagan

  7. #7
    Member Paul Stuart's Avatar
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    HI Ken
    When we train we go by the rules that HRC has in place in their lightning policy. You shouldn`t be running dogs until 20 minutes after the last bolt of thunder is heard. I remember running a fun trial at Betsy Berhard`s a few years back and a storm rolled in. We stupidly kept running dogs to get finished up. We didn`t realise what we were up against. Now that I have lost a good friend, Sandy Sonntag, I am much more carefull. When we judged at Yankee Waterfowlers a month ago, we had lightning to deal with and belive me we took cover and stayed there until we were sure it was gone past. Our Marshall also would not have permitted us to run dogs anyhow, as she didn`t want to have any casualties. Smart on her part.
    Northstar Retrievers

    www.Northstar-Retrievers.com

  8. #8
    Senior Member Aaron Homburg's Avatar
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    Never mess with it....if it is in the area I'm out!!!! Live to train another day!!!

    Aaron

  9. #9
    Senior Member Ken Bora's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Amrein
    As a so called lightning survivor I am much more aware and nervous when thunder and lightning are around nothing to take for granted.

    Prolly not a good Idea to sit next to me in the truck and ride it out either.
    so.... what happened??
    "So what is big is not always the Trout nor the Deer but the chance, the being there. And what is full is not necessarily the creel nor the freezer, but the memory." ~ Aldo Leopold

    "The Greatest Obstacle to Discovery is not Ignorance -- It is the Illusion of Knowledge" ~ Daniel Boorstin

  10. #10
    Senior Member Lady Duck Hunter's Avatar
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    Sunday we had a training group out here. The clouds were starting to roll in and I was keeping a watchful eye out. Never did see a flash but soon heard a pretty loud clap of thunder and I ordered everybody out of the field and to get up the hill to our house. We had been running dogs since about 8 a.m. and it was around 10:30, too early to go grab some lunch, so we sat inside and discussed the day so far, talked about the various factors and how they had an effect on our dogs etc.... Since we had a varied group (some more experienced than others, it was quite informative.) When the storm had passed we noticed that it was now noon and went into town to get lunch. We returned and those who could stayed for a short water session and puppy play. I hate that we didn't get a full days training in, especially since I pulled the plug when Dave was getting ready to run Angel who is gettng ready for Seniors, but the old pool lifeguard/swimming instructor in me makes me err on the side of caution in most things especially with storms.

    Ken, would you please tell a few of the details about Sandy's accident? I'm sure others will learn a valuable lesson from it.
    When it stops being fun, I will find something else to do with my time and money.

    The Lady

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