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Thread: Speaking of Calls

  1. #1
    Member prophet's Avatar
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    Default Speaking of Calls

    I have been thinking about getting new duck & goose calls. With all the call makers out there how does one choose??? What do you all use brand - single reed, double reed, flute etc.
    ________
    Suzuki b-king
    Last edited by prophet; 02-23-2011 at 11:38 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Gun_Dog2002's Avatar
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    Well a fairly well known RTF'r who blew a call once told me recently that for beginners such as myself that short barrel single reeds are a good starting point. He also mentioned that you can take two identical calls from a manufacturer and their will be subtle differences between. No two calls are identical. A few other friends suggested I hit Sportsman Warehouse and blow a bunch of different calls and find one that I like. In the end, I purchased a RNT hunter series single reed ($40.00), a RNT daisy cutter ($120.00) and a Basin Hot Shot single reed ($70.00 Dave lives in my old stompin grounds just south of me.) So far I'm having the best success with the Hot Shot. Great sound and I can do the feeding chuckle easier on it than the others I've had/own. Next would be the RNT Hunter series call. Its a close second. The daisy cutter is a bit harder for me. I have to say, there is a difference between these calls and the $10.00 primos/quack attacker calls I've used for so long. Much better sound and versatility. Course I probably still sound like a duck with a hemorrhoid but at least I think its a healthier duck....

    /Paul
    Paul Cantrell
    Black Ice Retrievers
    Marcola OR

    Too many dogs to list (By some Bitch)

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    "Helping Hunters Train Their Dogs"

  3. #3
    Senior Member Josh Conrad's Avatar
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    Best thing would be as Paul said, go to a store that will allow you to blow several. Better yet if you have a friend or two that are "call junkies" go over to their garage and blow away.

    You can get a lot of money tied up in finding THE call that works for you. I have a box of them, some are give aways from CWA and other events and some are very nice $pendy calls.

    What I find when I buy a new call is that I like the last call I bought better, lol.

    Right now my favorite duck call is a RNT Daisy Cutter and my favorite goose call is the Zink Money Maker. I'm sure that I will find a new favorite soon enough though.

    Many of the Poly calls are very good, but I really like the feel of an Acrylic call.

    Speaking of all of this, "why in the He!! am I not out hunting today?" OH I remember, I'm going to a Christmas Parade with my wife today....
    -------------------------
    Josh Conrad

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    good advice guys, i definately think the way to go is to find a shop with some different styles, try them and find out what your comfortable with. One mistake a lot of people make nowadays is being hooked on one callmaker. There is nothing wrong with brand loyalty, but there are too many good callmakers out there to deprive yourself from. I don't know your skill level, but generally speaking, you'll find ease of use in double reed calls, however your single reeds will provide, speed, responsiveness, and volume. Barrel length and insert also play a factor in the sound produced. Most calls are made as short (timber) open (all around-loud) and comp (open water and field-stage). Personally, I use timber calls for almost everything except for hunting lake of the woods. As far as goose calls go, short reed calls are the way to go. They produce every vocalization a live goose can make. Mastering them is not always easy but i'll give the same advice I give everyone. Try a few, pick one and stick with it. I might catch some flak but, prepare to spend a few bucks on one. Being formerly involved in the industry, i can tell you that unfortunately, a lot of calls produced are inferior and aren't even tuned properly in the store. The reason for this is that half the calls bought end up in a desk drawer or classifed ad by people who give up on em. Practice for five minutes a day, everyday, the second you get frustrated, put it down. Pick it up later and try again. Also, buy and instructional video or best yet, practice with a friend who can call well. Good luck bud, let us know what calls you decide on!

  5. #5
    Senior Member Dale's Avatar
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    I have Foiles, Straight meat Mallard double reed, a Meatgrinder goose call, and a High Plains Honker goose call. At the last waterfowl days they had a the Sportsman's Warehouse the guys from Foiles hand tuned them all for me. (free including a new reed in the High Plains Honker) There are a lot of good calls. At the Sportsman's warehouse waterfowl event. Foiles, Shawn Man, and Buck Gardener all had reps there. Now that I think about it they should give me a commission, I sold 5 calls for them that weekend.


    Thinking about a Foiles "Timber Rattler" regards.

  6. #6
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    I have a couple thousand dollars worth of calls and still have not found "the one". For geese, I wouldn't buy anything but a short reed. If you can learn to run a single reed for ducks, then that is the way I would go. If you can't get the hang of a single reed, try a double. There are a lot of good calls out there. The Foiles Straight Meat honker and a Watkins hybrid swamp bore would be where I would start a new guy.

    Joel Thorstad gave some good info! Call makers like Brian Watkins and John Taylor are not the big advertised names........but make some very nice sounding calls. Brian's Duck calls and John's Shorething goose call are great calls, not to mention the great customer service both of these guys offer. The average weekend warrior will probably not recognize these names, but any serious caller will know who you're talking about. Of course the bigger names like Foiles, RNT, Echo, Grounds and others make nice calls too. If you can get your hands on a bunch of calls that are still factory tuned you might find the call that just seems easier for you to operate, then practice till you turn blue.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Richard Finch's Avatar
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    Check these out www.riverbottomcalls.com.


    Tell Doug Richard sent ya.



    Richard
    SHOOT EM' IN THE LIPS..........

    HRCH Otter Sloughs Bronze Gander " Gander"
    TTF Duck Sloughs Make Mine a Double "Shooter"

    www.ducksloughkennel.com

    Romans 8:28

  8. #8
    Member prophet's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the help so far Looks like I will take a ride to Cabela's, Sportsmans warehouse etc.
    Is there a major difference between acrylic, polycarbonate, & wood in your opinion???
    I guess I'm an okay caller better than some but I'm sure not as good as a whole ton of others
    like anything else the more you practice the better you become
    ________
    Extreme vaporizer
    Last edited by prophet; 02-23-2011 at 11:38 PM.

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    Acrylic is the most dense material, produces the most volume, and generally cleaner sound, it also wont expand or contract in weather conditions. Wood is still a great material, when I hunt tight areas and rivers, I like to use a wood call, they also resonate more and produce a little different tune. RNT uses many different kinds of wood with different densities which I find very unique. The biggest downfall to wood however is that in different temps and climates it can expand and contract. One day you could be workin your call and the next morning if it gets cold, you can have a really different sounding call or have loose guts in your call. Polycarb calls are durable and cost efficient but some just dont have the sound quality of their acrylic counterparts. There are however some great poly's on the market.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Rick Hall's Avatar
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    Is there a major difference between acrylic, polycarbonate, & wood in your opinion???
    Yes there is, in my, opinion. But others might find the differences insignificant. As a rule of thumb and given calls of identical design, the denser the material, the crisper or more edgy the tone, and the less dense the material, the more mellow the tone. Some favor one tone quality, some the other. (And many probably can't tell the difference.) If you can tell the difference and have more confidence in one than the other, justified or not, then that difference may be quite meaningful.

    Acrylic is the densest of commonly used call materials, but some very dense woods come fairly close, with African blackwood and cocobolo being two of the more popular varieties in that catagory. Folks seeking mellower tones tend to favor less dense woods like Bois d'Arc (aka: hedge or osage orange) or the least dense of commonly used woods, bocote. (Acrylic densities also vary, with molded acrylic calls being somewhat less dense than turned acrylic calls.)

    Acrylic and other plastic calls are also somewhat more stable tone-wise and require a bit less maintenance than woods, as the less dense woods will absorb some moisture with use, which changes their tone, and because of that swelling and shrinking as moisture is absorbed and dries out, are prone to having their inserts stick in their barrels unless one separates the two while they dry following use.

    My heart says "wood" but experience dictates "acrylic". Your mileage may vary.
    If you think I'm wrong, you might be right.

    (And to see just how confused I really am, join us in my online blind at: Rick's 2012-2013 season log)

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