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Thread: EIC carrier to EIC clear = ?

  1. #1
    Senior Member helencalif's Avatar
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    Default EIC carrier to EIC clear = ?

    When an EIC carrier is bred to an EIC clear, what will the estimated per centages be in the litter ?

    I can't seem to find this info.

    I found the CNM per cents, but not the EIC per cents.

    Helen

  2. #2

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    50% carriers, 50%clear theoretically.

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    Senior Member nimloth's Avatar
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    All autosomal recessive traits follow the same statistical probability. Well... that was clear as mud, I guess

    What I mean is that CNM, PRA and several other DNA identified traits that are caused by a recessive gene will follow the same rules of % inheritance. If you can find a table for PRA or CNM, it will be the same projected percentage as for EIC - even though that specific table has not yet been published.

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    You can figure the percentages and possibillities by making a box with four squares. Each dog has two genes for the trait. Only one of the genes is passed on to each offspring.

    The square works for simple recessive traits like blue eyes in people, yellow hair in labs, CNM and EIC.

    For instance with black or yellow labs, you have two collums labeled with either BB, BY, YY and two rows labeled with either BB, BY or YY. In the squares you just add the letters together. Chocolate is supposedly a type of yellow, and I don't know how to figure that off the top of my head.

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    Melanie Foster
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    Senior Member nimloth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DL View Post
    You can figure the percentages and possibillities by making a box with four squares.
    It is called a Punnett Square and here is a link to some information about it with an example of how it is used
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punnett_square

    For instance with black or yellow labs, you have two collums labeled with either BB, BY, YY and two rows labeled with either BB, BY or YY. In the squares you just add the letters together.
    Well.... sort of. The gene for yellow (phaeomelanin) is recessive to the gene for dark hair (eumelanin) and if you are ONLY working with dogs that don't carry chocolate, this sort of thinking will work.

    Chocolate is supposedly a type of yellow, and I don't know how to figure that off the top of my head.
    Please.... there is enough misinformation about chocolates without adding more. Chocolate is not only NOT a type of yellow, it happens as a result of a factor in the Black (dark color) gene locus. So... you really don't just have two combinations that you can easily stick into a simple Punnett Square, but a multiple-gene combination that fits into the DIHYBRID cross example shown at the bottom of the Punnett Square link I gave.

    Here is a pretty good link to a page on color inheritance and probability.
    http://www.blueknightlabs.com/color/coatcolor.html

  7. #7

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    Here is the info you need on EIC and Penett square http://www.cvm.umn.edu/img/assets/93...%207-28-08.pdf
    The failure to condemn an activity is indeed, an offer of tacit approval.
    - Edmund Burke

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    Senior Member nimloth's Avatar
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    Thanks for the link.

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    Senior Member Katie Minor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogguy View Post
    Here is the info you need on EIC and Penett square http://www.cvm.umn.edu/img/assets/93...%207-28-08.pdf
    This link is also on the test webpage:

    For EIC information related to genetics and breeding, click here .

    http://www.vdl.umn.edu/vdl/ourservic...ular/home.html

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    Member KRP's Avatar
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    UNDERSTANDING TEST RESULTS: THE INHERITANCE OF EIC


    In exchange for allowing them to sample your dog to advance the research into how common the
    mutation is in the Labrador population, the laboratory in Minnesota will provide you with test results,
    letting you know whether your dog is:
    Affected by EIC (has 2 copies of the probable causative mutation)
    A carrier of EIC (has 1 copy of the probable causative mutation)
    Clear of EIC (no copies of the probable causative mutation)
    EXPLANATION:
    Every dog gets 2 copies of every gene - one from its mother and one from its father.
    The mutation in the gene that causes EIC is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, which means that
    all affected dogs (those showing signs of collapse) have 2 copies of the mutated gene - one that they
    got from their mother, and one that they got from their father.
    Carriers, by definition, are dogs that have one copy of the mutated gene that they got from either
    their mother or their father and they have one normal copy of the gene that they got from the other parent.
    These dogs do not have EIC and will not show signs of collapse. They will pass their copy of the mutated
    gene on to approximately half of their puppies.
    - if a carrier is bred to a non-carrier, none of their pups will be affected by EIC, but about half of
    their pups will be carriers.
    - if a carrier is bred to another carrier, about 1/2 of their pups will be carriers, 1/4 of their pups will
    be non-carriers (clear) and 1/4 of their pups will be affected by EIC.
    - if a carrier is bred to an affected dog, about 1/2 of their pups will be carriers and 1/2 of their
    pups will be affected by EIC.
    So you can see, if you have a carrier dog or bitch, it is very important to know the EIC status of
    any dog you are breeding to.
    Clear dogs are dogs that do not have any copies of the mutation.
    - these dogs do not have EIC and will not show signs of collapse
    - if a clear dog is bred to a non-carrier (clear) dog, none of their pups will be carriers and none
    will have EIC
    - if a clear dog is bred to a carrier, about 1/2 of their pups will be carriers but none will have EIC
    - if a clear dog is bred to an affected dog, all of their pups will be carriers, but none will actually
    have EIC.
    Affected dogs have 2 copies of the mutation
    -both of their parents are either carriers or affected by EIC
    -affected dogs have EIC and most will show signs of exercise intolerance or collapse when
    participating in trigger activities with a high level of excitement/stress
    - a few genetically affected dogs (having 2 copies of the mutation) never exhibit any signs of EIC
    -breeding one affected dog to another affected dog will result in all puppies having EIC.
    - if an affected dog is bred to a carrier, about 1/2 of their pups will be carriers and of their pups
    will be affected by EIC.
    - if an affected dog is bred to a clear dog, all of their pups will be carriers, but none will actually
    have EIC

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