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Thread: Puppy with an Overbite

  1. #11
    Senior Member ErinsEdge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teeroy View Post
    His overbite ended up being about a 1/4 inch. The pup was taken to the breeders vet and they did not feel it would be a problem and it will hopefully get better, however, they feel he will always have a overbite. My concern is that his lower canines teeth are inline or just behind his top canines and inside them. It looks like they go up into his top gums. My vet said something that he has seen dogs that they get little holes where their bottom teeth line up with their gums. Has anyone run into this before (holes in the roof of mouth)? If so is it anything to be concerned with? Thanks
    Yes, the canines might have to be pulled. That is the problem with the overbite. I'm guessing this breeder is well aware of the problem because she has had it before and she is trying to minimize it. When I had one with I remember a little over 1/4 inch many years ago he had to have teeth pulled. The pup was sold as a pet with no papers and very reasonably.
    Last edited by ErinsEdge; 09-25-2008 at 09:42 AM.
    Nancy P



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  2. #12
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    I think I would pass on that whole litter. Picking up a healthy pup is the cheapest way to have low DVM bills later on. I would hate to have trained a dog and have something that shouldn't have been a problem become a very expensive one late in the game. There are plenty of great dogs out there for sale pretty darn cheap right now without this problem.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ErinsEdge View Post
    Yes, the canines might have to be pulled. That is the problem with the overbite. I'm guessing this breeder is well aware of the problem because she has had it before and she is trying to minimize it. When I had one with I remember a little over 1/4 inch many years ago he had to have teeth pulled. The pup was sold as a pet with no papers and very reasonably.

    I agree with Nancy. Also, have had problems where the adult canines poke holes in the roof of the mouth causing sinus infections.

    I would think this breeder should give you the dog.

    WRL

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    He has a clear bill of health except for the overbite. He seems like a wonderful pup and seems very intellegent and has a great demeanor. I'm not interested in giving him back, just trying to get information as to what the holes in the roof of his mouth can cause, other than the holes themselves. Do they tend to get infected, etc.? Or if there is something we can do early to ward off any future problems, again other than giving him back.

    I have to believe there are many dogs out there with this problem that are doing just fine!! Thanks for the info!!

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teeroy View Post
    He has a clear bill of health except for the overbite. He seems like a wonderful pup and seems very intellegent and has a great demeanor. I'm not interested in giving him back, just trying to get information as to what the holes in the roof of his mouth can cause, other than the holes themselves. Do they tend to get infected, etc.? Or if there is something we can do early to ward off any future problems, again other than giving him back.

    I have to believe there are many dogs out there with this problem that are doing just fine!! Thanks for the info!!
    My point in stating you should be given this puppy, is that it could cost you significant vet bills in the future.

    Right now, as you have described, I'd have the canines pulled. Hopefully, you will not have any issues until the permanent teeth come in.

    WRL

  6. #16
    Senior Member North Mountain's Avatar
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    I have a friend with a pup with an overbite. They ground down her canines so that they would not poke the roof of her mouth.
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  7. #17
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    That is exactly what I was thinking. I have had a couple teeth ground a bit where my bite comes together and it was really not a big deal. I know my 10 year old lab has broken all his canines through years of hunting and fetching a hundred miles an hour while picking up sticks and never slowing down.

    Thanks for input, that's what I'm looking for.

    Did I mention how nice the pup, and the how wonderful the breeder has been to deal with as well. They could have never said anything about this and I would have never known a thing. She is a great lady and I would without a doubt buy another pup from her in the future. I have never met someone who cares so much for their dogs. I love the fact that she cared as much about who I am and my background with dogs as I cared about her as a breeder. Great experience to date!!

  8. #18
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    Um, folks.... the puppy is 47 days old. Mouthes can and do change. In fact, a perfect bite can go off and an off bite can align itself. It all depends on degrees. An extreme parrot mouth would be pretty obvious. If the vet is well-versed in structural development, he can give some estimation about the puppy's condition. But then again, it is only an estimation.

    I know of an accidental litter (this is Foxhounds) where the father was parrot mouthed: 12 puppies, all had perfect bites at 10 weeks. Those that the breeder kept up with continued to have normal, correct bites for their entire lives.

    My mentor in the Foxhound world had an absolutely gorgeous 8-month old male whose bite was an had been significantly off. She had made arrangements for him to go to a running pen and the day she was about to send him, she went over him one more time and his bite was normal. I saw this dog myself both when the bite was off and later, when it was correct. That was unusual enough for continued comment, but the dog didn't go to the running pen and instead went on for a successful career in the show ring, finishing easily and winning numerous group placements.

    If it were me and the overbite was minor (which it isn't), I would take the puppy, particularly given its age, as these situations do change.

    P.S. Teeroy, I just saw your last post. Quarter of an inch is a significant overbite, given how tiny the mouths are at seven weeks, particularly if the canines are inside the maxillae. If you proceed, do so with caution. Is there another puppy available in the litter?

  9. #19
    Senior Member Last Frontier Labs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teeroy View Post
    I have to believe there are many dogs out there with this problem that are doing just fine!! Thanks for the info!!
    I have seen 2. I produced them both. I kept one who is a great dog. The other I gave away for the costs of the pup's vaccines. The vet xrayed the dog I kept as he believed the problem to be caused by trauma. He examined the xrays and told me that he did believe it was caused by trauma, but soon after, I produced the other pup. After seeing pup # 2, we agreed it must be genetic.
    Neither dog has needed special care. In both cases, the teeth have misaligned themselves so as not to cause any issues for the dog. You can't tell either dog has an overbite until you lift their jowls.

    Twinkie's nick name is "gnarfie". This name came about when my daughters started calling her overbite a "gnarf".

    As for picking pups without medical problems, I would much prefer to use a breeder who has been open and honest about a particular problem than someone who chose to cover up problems. I consider myself to use the utmost care (sometimes overly so) when picking stud dogs to use for breeding... Any breeder will tell you things happen and issues will pop up.

    I will try to take some pics of Twinkie's gnarf tonight. I have some pics of dog #2's overbite as a pup and will post those as well. Hopefully, this will provide the board with information on "Brachygnathism" which is the scientific name of the condition.
    Sherri Young

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