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Thread: WOW I find this scary GDG

  1. #1
    Senior Member badbullgator's Avatar
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    Default WOW I find this scary GDG

    You learn something new everyday I guess. Hard to believe that some scumbag like "Dog the Bounty Hunter" can circumvent the Constitution in regards to needing a warrent to enter your property

    Courtesy Washington State Dept. of Licensing
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    Yes, bounty hunting is legal, although state laws vary with regard to the rights of bounty hunters. In general, they have greater authority to arrest than even the local police. "When the defendant signs the bail bond contract, they do something very important. They waive their constitutional rights," says Burton. "They agree that they can be arrested by the bail bond agent. And they waive extradition, allowing bondsmen to take them to any state."
    All the bounty hunter needs to make an arrest is a copy of the "bail piece" (the paperwork indicating that the person is a fugitive) and, in some states, a certified copy of the bond. He or she doesn't need a warrant, can enter private property unannounced and doesn't have to read a fugitive his or her Miranda rights before making the arrest. But there are rules and regulations to the job. The bail bond contract gives bounty hunters the right to enter the home of a fugitive, but only after establishing without a doubt that the person lives there. They cannot enter the homes of friends or family members to look for the fugitive.
    Views and opinions expressed herein by Badbullgator do not necessarily represent the policies or position of RTF. RTF and all of it's subsidiaries can not be held liable for the off centered humor and politically incorrect comments of the author.
    Corey Burke

  2. #2
    Senior Member K G's Avatar
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    If the defendant "jumps bail," they deserve what they get.

    Play by the rules regards,

    kg
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  3. #3
    Senior Member badbullgator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K G View Post
    If the defendant "jumps bail," they deserve what they get.

    Play by the rules regards,

    kg
    Keith I don't have a problem with that. I have a problem with them, bounty hunters, being able to enter YOUR property looking for their bad guy. What about

    The Fourth Amendment (Amendment IV) to the United States Constitution is one of the provisions included in the Bill of Rights. The Fourth Amendment guards against unreasonable searches and seizures, and was designed as a response to the controversial writ of assistance (a type of general search warrant), which was a significant factor behind the American Revolution. Toward that end, the amendment specifies that judicially sanctioned search and arrest warrants must be supported by probable cause and be limited in scope according to specific information supplied by a person (usually a law enforcement officer) who has sworn by it and is therefore accountable to the issuing court.

    Kind of a nice rule don't you think? It seems BH's need no warrent period and can come into your house looking for their bad guy.
    I am all for the bad guys getting caught, but not some ex-con bounty hunter being able to come into my house becasue he thinks a bad guy might be there.
    Views and opinions expressed herein by Badbullgator do not necessarily represent the policies or position of RTF. RTF and all of it's subsidiaries can not be held liable for the off centered humor and politically incorrect comments of the author.
    Corey Burke

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    Quote Originally Posted by badbullgator View Post
    The bail bond contract gives bounty hunters the right to enter the home of a fugitive, but only after establishing without a doubt that the person lives there. They cannot enter the homes of friends or family members to look for the fugitive.
    How does that give them the right to enter YOUR home because they think the bad guy is there, unless that bad guy is YOU?? Am I missing something?
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    Corey.....you got a friend/family member that just jumped bail?????? LOL!

    Wondering why your worried regards,

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    Senior Member i_willie12's Avatar
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    No different than the cops coming into your house looking for some bad guy that they might think is in there. The only difference is that the cops have to wait hours to get a judge to look over the case and give them a search warrant. Then by the time the cops get there the guy is gone. Bounty hunters go in when they feel certain the bad guy is there and if he is not then they leave and keep looking!!!
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    Senior Member Ken Newcomb's Avatar
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    The bail bond contract gives bounty hunters the right to enter the home of a fugitive, but only after establishing without a doubt that the person lives there. They cannot enter the homes of friends or family members to look for the fugitive.


    Doesn't this section keep them from entering MY home unless they are looking for ME?
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    Whats the big deal? They cant just walk into any home. They have to be certain that they are in there with out a doubt before they go in, just like it says in your post. If you are worried about them coming into your home, then dont have a fugitive in your house and you wont worry about it. If they do come into your house WITHOUT permission prior and the fugitive isnt there then you can bring the law down on them.

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    Senior Member K G's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBax View Post
    Whats the big deal? They cant just walk into any home. They have to be certain that they are in there with out a doubt before they go in, just like it says in your post. If you are worried about them coming into your home, then dont have a fugitive in your house and you wont worry about it. If they do come into your house WITHOUT permission prior and the fugitive isnt there then you can bring the law down on them.
    Exactly.

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    Senior Member Russ's Avatar
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    Reading Miranda rights is irrelevant as they are not seeking evidence, only the fugitive. They are also not seaching for or seizing evidence.

    The Bill of Rights was written to protect against the actions of the government not individual citizens. A bounty hunter is not an agent of the government.

    An agent of the government has even broader rights for search and seizure when convicted felons waive their rights by contract to leave the confines of prison, i.e parole. A parole officer can search at any time.

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