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Thread: bladder infections

  1. #1

    Default bladder infections

    My 5 month old female chesapeake has been getting a lot of bladder infections. My vet said i need to rinse her when she has been around the water. He has been treating her with anti biotics wich makes it go away but it seems to come back a few weeks later. i think i will talk to our vet tommorow because it is starting to seem like were treating the syptom and not the problem. Do any of you have any suggestions why my young dog keeps getting bladder infections?

  2. #2
    Senior Member windycanyon's Avatar
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    Is her urine pH running high? If so, a simple trick I've used is to give a half of a chewable vit C (acid form) to lower her pH. If the pH is high, it's favorable for the bacterial growth. Anything you can do to enhance her immune system is good too. With all of the antibiotics you are giving, you may want to seriously consider getting her on some probiotics too, btw.

    She probably squats close to the ground so is picking up bugs there. Anne

  3. #3
    Senior Member ErinsEdge's Avatar
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    Young females often get them particularly if she has an innie. Make sure you don't spay her if you are going to until after her first heat where the inny will pop out and things will get better. In the mean time you can try acidifying her urine with Vitamin C and/or a cranberry supplement and try to wipe her last drop off after she pees so the last drop doesn't go up instead of out. It is common and a PITA but it will get better. You can do a search and someone recommended D-Mannose also.
    Nancy P



    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

  4. #4
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    At 5 months of age it is likely that your dog is teething (arrival of permanent teeth). Quite a few of the female puppies we’ve owned and even a couple of the male puppies have had bladder infections. Their infections often corresponded with teething.

    When we’ve had a bladder infection cultured it has always been E. coli bacteria. The standard antibiotic, particularly for puppies, is Clavamox because other antibiotics can affect the active growth plates in young dogs. In our experience, the Clavamox by itself has never been effective in treating bladder infections. When treated with Clavamox alone, the infection would recur within a day or two of discontinuing each extended round of antibiotics. We’ve had 100% success treating bladder infections with a combination of Clavamox and d-Mannose sugar. The mannose is used to treat chronic bladder infections in humans and is the active ingredient found in cranberries and blueberries but, 10X - 50X stronger.

    The cell walls of E. coli bacteria have pili (tiny finger-like projections) that enable the bacteria to bind to the polysaccharide molecules lining the wall of the bladder and prevent the E. coli from being rinsed out by urination. Clavamox is ineffective by itself because the E. coli imbedded in the lining of the bladder are a ready source of reinfection. The bladder infection returns as soon as the antibiotic therapy ends. The chemical structure of the d-Mannose causes it to adhere to the E. coli even more stubbornly than such bacteria sticks to the polysaccharide molecules lining the bladder. Thus, the E. coli preferentially attach to d-Mannose molecules filling up all of the bacterial anchoring sites. The bacteria can no longer attach to the bladder wall and are, therefore, flushed away. The combination of Clavamox and d-Mannose is effective because the Clavamox controls available E. coli while the d-Mannose prevents the E. coli from imbedding in the bladder lining.

    You might find a source of d-Mannose in a health food store or a compounding pharmacy. I order 100 gram bottles of d-Mannose in a powdered form from Bio-Tech Pharmacal, Inc. (http://www.bio-tech-pharm.com/products/mannose.html). The concentration of the Bio-Tech product is 1 tsp. = 0.9 grams of d-Mannose.

    The puppy dosage recommended by a local veterinarian was 1/4 tsp. every 3-4 hours with or without food. She said 2-4 days is usually enough but, I’ve had the best results by continuing to sprinkle it on the food as long as I'm giving antibiotic. I usually just liberally sprinkle directly from the bottle onto the particular dog's food at each feeding. With a bladder infection, I also give the dog water w/d-Mannose and some kibbles added to encourage drinking several times a day. The only concern with giving too much is that it costs $50 for a 100 gram bottle. Very little of the d-Mannose is metabolized and most is excreted in the urine.

    Hope this helps,

    Tom
    Last edited by Riverrun; 11-03-2008 at 05:40 PM.

  5. #5

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    Thanks for the advice I am going to try the d mannose if i can find it at our local pharmacy along with the amoxicillen.

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    Senior Member labdoc's Avatar
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    Respectful of the above posts, they are back to treating the symptoms. Although I don't know what "a lot" is, at this point I would recommend a urine culture. Find out what is growing and what it is sensitive to. A urinalysis looking for calculi (although she is quite young), ph, and glucose, and possible bladder ultrasound will tell you if there is a congenital problem (urachal remnant, ectopic ureter, etc.) You need to find out why, if possible, and treat appropriately. Oh and by the way Amoxicillin and Clavamox are different drugs. Many bacteria are resistant to Amoxicillin, Clavamox..not so much.
    Curt

    Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote!----Benjamin Franklin

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    Member 30 caliber's Avatar
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    I totally agree with the others about getting a urine culture and sensitivity done. Make sure your veterinarian uses a lab that performs the MIC technique of urine culture. I also agree that you should have tests done to rule out anatomical birth defects. The only other thing I have to add is to give the evening dose of antibiotic after your dog goes outside to pee for the last time. That way the antibiotics sit in the urine inside the bladder all night- longer contact time. Good luck.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Janice Gunn's Avatar
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    I had a bitch puppy that did the same.
    We'd take her off Clavamox and the infection would return.
    We ended up leaving her on Clavamox for 12 weeks solid - no breaks.
    When I took her off (finally!) it was gone.

    No ill effects from the Clavamox......
    Once off the antibotics - I kept her on Cranberry pills for another couple
    of months.

  9. #9
    Senior Member ErinsEdge's Avatar
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    Bacteria can gain entry to the urinary tract via the bloodstream from other sites in the body.
    You need to understand that when bacteria enter the bloodstream it is extremely abnormal and is called a septicemia. I'm sure your physician sister can verify this. The most logical route of entry of ecoli is from the urethra up from fecal contamination on the ground or on the individual, not by mouth.

    I just always assume that a good vet does a culture and sensitivity in all cases but definitely in reoccurring UTI's, but this may not be a case. When the organism is identified by culture, and all are not EColi, (EColi can be very stubborn and difficult to get rid of), and the best antibiotic is selected by the sensitivity, and the UTI reappears, it may be because the last drop of urine goes up instead of out, especially with an innie. It may also be another abnormality like Labdoc outlines but the inny problem is very common in Labs.

    I heard of most of the problems between 8 and 16 weeks and don't have anything to do with teething. Also, don't assume Clavamox will always work either-that's why sensitivities are run.
    Last edited by ErinsEdge; 11-03-2008 at 06:09 PM.
    Nancy P



    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

  10. #10
    Senior Member labdoc's Avatar
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    As Erins Edge states most bacteria are from ascending up the urethra NOT via the bloodstream. Although e.coli can be found in the oral cavity, the usual source of e.coli infections is via the intestinal system, i.e. the anus in the case of most UTI's. I would suggest to Riverrun that an e.coli infection would likely ascend from the urethra. If it were enterococcus, staph, or strep, oral sources could be more likely. I really suspect in the teething cases, stress and reluctance to drink adequately has more to contribute than oral bacteria. Obviously we will never know the real source in the cases mentioned.
    Curt

    Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote!----Benjamin Franklin

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