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Thread: EIC/CNM common in British Labradors?

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    Default EIC/CNM common in British Labradors?

    I was wondering how common it is for imported British labs to carry the EIC/CNM genes? Is it more prevalent in american labs or is there any research either way on the matter?

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    Senior Member GulfCoast's Avatar
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    Of the handful of "british" labs that I know of who have been tested for EIC/CNM/PRA, none have been carriers or affected, including mine. However, that sample size is so small, it probably has no statistical significance. I would expect the EIC carrier/affected percentages to be about the same as in US dogs. I have no idea of the CNM percentages. Haynes Floyd at TT lists the clearances on most of his breeding dogs on his website, and is the only breeder I am aware of that does so. I am not sure if the big "puppy mills" even do the clearances for them.

    Eug: Are these common tests for breeding dogs on your side of the pond yet?
    Last edited by GulfCoast; 03-16-2011 at 08:17 AM.
    Wm. Mark Edwards
    Pascagoula, MS

    HRCH (500) UH Ellie Mae MH
    SHR Tipsy

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    Regarding numbers of CNM carriers in the UK and other countries ---- yes we are finding quite a few carriers and have worked with affected CNM litters in the UK. We work with a total of 18 countries and there are no countries, so far, without CNM. I do not know about EIC and other DNA identified diseases.

    Related to this, The Alfort School of Veterinary Medicine is the only official laboratory globally for testing CNM. The research team at Alfort headed by Dr. Laurent Tiret, identified the CNM mutation and developed the specific procedure for searching a canine’s cell to find if the mutation is present. While the genome location and name of the mutation that causes CNM has been published internationally, the specifics unique to the step by step procedures and precautions to identify clear, carrier, and affected status have not been fully published. No other laboratories have been given the full details on testing procedures and the important reliability measures. Therefore, it is much too easy for other locations, in all countries, to make errors.

    The most common error by others is to identify a carrier as clear. We are currently helping several breeders that were provided bad information from testing done at “for profit”, discount, and unapproved locations. Sadly the mistakes do not show up immediately but are found in tragic litters a generation or more later. It is always best to test with the research scientists who originally identified the mutation that causes a given disease, no matter what the disease is. The original researchers know the most about the disease and how to reliably test for the disease. They also actively work on the disease and its mechanisms that will help find relevant therapeutic strategies in the future.

    If you have questions, please contact me directly at cnminfo@centurytel.net as I do not look at PMs often and only check RTF a couple times a week.

    Happy Retrieving,

    Marilyn

    Marilyn J Fender, PhD
    Global Communications Coordinator, CNM Project

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    Senior Member Rainmaker's Avatar
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    Marilyn, wonderful post. How very sad that some are getting "false clears" and breeding CNM affected litters just to save a few bucks. This really drives home supporting Alfort for CNM and U of M's VDL for EIC, the developers of the tests.
    Kim Pfister, Rainmaker Labs

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    Senior Member Hunt'EmUp's Avatar
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    Well CNM testing was developed in France, one would assume it was developed first over there for a reason.
    EIC was first done in Minn. and there's probably a reason for that as well

    Tests are usually developed where there is a market or a need

    Still I bet the gene frequency is the same in both populations; lines are continuously im and exported
    Last edited by Hunt'EmUp; 03-16-2011 at 03:42 PM.

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    Senior Member Rainmaker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunt'EmUp View Post
    Well CNM testing was developed in France, one would assume it was developed first over there for a reason.
    EIC was first done in Minn. and there's probably a reason for that as well
    Wow.. . . . .
    Kim Pfister, Rainmaker Labs

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    Member jazzypad1's Avatar
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    As far as EIC is concerned, here in the UK, most breeders are just burying their heads in the sand and not acknowledging that there is a problem with EIC!
    The EIC gene is mainly in British show (conformation) lines.
    My black lab (who comes from a mix of show and field trial lines) is a carrier.

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    Senior Member Colonel Blimp's Avatar
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    Eug: Are these common tests for breeding dogs on your side of the pond yet?
    CNM and PRA are pretty standard.

    I'm really unsure about EIC. The first I learned of it was in this largely US based forum; it isn't a routine procedure here yet so it may be as jazzypad suggested a great big conspiracy of silence.

    On the other hand I get around quite a bit and have certainly never seen a working Lab display the condition or even heard of one.

    Regards
    Eug
    Thank you, very kind, Mine's a pint.

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    Senior Member EdA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunt'EmUp View Post
    Well CNM testing was developed in France, one would assume it was developed first over there for a reason.
    EIC was first done in Minn. and there's probably a reason for that as well
    Actually CNM (Type II Myopathy of Labrador Retrievers) was first identified and described by Dr. Kyle Braund, Scott Ritchey Research Center at Auburn University in the 1980s. Dr. Braund was looking for a research model for muscular dystrophy in children. Definitive diagnosis was by a muscle biopsy. A research colony of affected dogs was maintained at Scott Ritchey and it was suspected to be an autosomal recessive genetically transmitted disease and was renamed ARMD (Autosomal Recessive Muscular Dystrophy). Dr. Bruce Smith, who succeeded Dr. Braund at Scott Ritchey, had been working on a genetic test when researchers at The Alfort School of Veterinary Medicine identified the gene and developed the test.

  10. #10

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    Ed

    To sort this out a bit more: Yes, Dr. Braund did the original research as this terrible disease showed up in Labradors --- especially through the 1970's. However the team at Alfort found that the canine disease that was being seen was not related to Muscular Dystrophy in humans as many had thought. Because it was a different disease, many of the USA researchers were looking in the wrong genetic area.

    Instead the Alfort team found that the disease was more related to human Centronuclear Myopathy. The mutation was in a totally different location than it would have been had it been the canine version of MD. The change in the name occurred because the disease was not similar to MD as was previously assumed. There was a whole list of names that had been used during the early research by others.

    The French research did not build on what the USA researchers had done except for recognizing that it was a terrible disease that was appearing in Labradors all over the world. They found the mutation in a location that was not anywhere near where the MD one would have been. The research at Alfort was mainly supported by the French Association for Myopathies.

    The team at Alfort identified what we now call Labrador CNM was similar to human CNM in 1992. Then in 2002 the team at Alfort (by then led by Dr. Tiret) identified the mutation. In 2005, Dr Laurent Tiret introduced it to the USA at the NARC business meeting in Minnesota.

    There is a canine disease that is very similar to MD. It is carried by females and the characteristics show up only in males. The males seldom live to full maturity. Canine MD has been identified in Golden Retrievers but not yet in Labradors. Alfort seems to be close to identifying it in Labradors. Due to the way it is inherited, MD in canines is not seen as often and the males that are affected are not bred.

    Marilyn Fender

    Marilyn J Fender PhD
    Communications Coordinator -- CNM Project

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