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Thread: Reread the sticky " cooling back" above

  1. #11
    Senior Member EdA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Greenwood View Post
    Are they more susceptable to heat if they had a heat stroke attack, like a human is?
    probably, again no science to confirm it but veterinarians have always cautioned that susceptibility to heat exhaustion is enhanced if it has happened previously, the thermo regulating mechanism for the body is located in the hypothalamus and it is possible that an episode of significant hyperthermia could somehow reset the thermoregulator making the dog more susceptible to heat exhaustion in the future

  2. #12
    Senior Member Todd Caswell's Avatar
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    What was your high yesterday like 82? Did you take the dog's temp right away or just when it was 100.4(normal for a dog)? I just don't understand how a dog goes down from heat at 80 degrees running a triple? Trained in 98 degrees and 65 % humidity yesterday and had no problems.

    I know it seems kind of strange, our temp was around 80 but it was very humid, I mowed our grass befor I left and I was soaked. this dog has been on 3 winter trips, I know he's been pushed harder than he was yesterday, he had a pretty big hunt on one of the birds and was recalled on one of the birds, so it added up to quit a bit of work. And like I said he doesn't do anything half speed.

    I did not take his temp untill we got home, since we now have a "Rectal" thermometer I'm going to keep it in my first aid kit.

    Hopefully it was just one of those things that happened, I'll certainly keep a close eye on him from now on.


    I had it happen to my 9 year old female, when she was about 5 we were going to go on a short hour long grouse hunt on a fairly warm day in September I got turned around and it ended up being a 3 hour walk with another dog that didn't know when to quit. We made it back to the truck but she went down right befor we got there. I didn't have AC but there was a stream right there to get her into. And I have never had a problem with her since.

  3. #13
    Senior Member kindakinky's Avatar
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    Dr. Ed:
    Can you explain the conformational/structural traits that lead to a larger diameter airway?

    Thanks.

    J. Marti

    Quote Originally Posted by EdA View Post
    I would guess that your (our) dogs are already acclimated and have shed their winter coats, a dog from Minnesota probably has not shed winter hair and has not had much exposure to 80 F

    I think dogs become conditioned to heat much like people do, I ran regularly for about 10 years, 5 miles per day, midday year round, by mid summer I was superbly conditioned to heat

    Some dogs are just inherently more heat tolerant than others, I have had both kinds, I have always theorized that the larger the diameter of the airway the more heat tolerant the dog is, however I have no scientific support for my theory but if anyone would like to fund the study I think I could get it done.

  4. #14
    Senior Member EdA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kindakinky View Post
    Dr. Ed:
    Can you explain the conformational/structural traits that lead to a larger diameter airway?

    Thanks.

    J. Marti
    tracheal diameter, the size of the primary airway, it is not the same in all dogs, the larger the diameter the greater air exchange, we have not focused on or identified this as a factor in heat tolerance

  5. #15
    Administrator Chris Atkinson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdA View Post
    tracheal diameter, the size of the primary airway, it is not the same in all dogs, the larger the diameter the greater air exchange, we have not focused on or identified this as a factor in heat tolerance
    Dr. Ed, I remember Martin Coffman, DVM, at the time a Eukanuba employee, telling me that one of the best things to do when a dog is overheated is to get his face right in the cold air vent outlet in the vehicle and let him breathe in the coldest AC air you can get.

    His theory as well, was that there is significant heat exchange and cooling impact through breathing. It makes sense that the greater the exposed surface area, the greater the cooling impact.

    Chris

  6. #16
    Senior Member achiro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Caswell View Post
    I know it seems kind of strange, our temp was around 80 but it was very humid, I mowed our grass befor I left and I was soaked. this dog has been on 3 winter trips, I know he's been pushed harder than he was yesterday, he had a pretty big hunt on one of the birds and was recalled on one of the birds, so it added up to quit a bit of work. And like I said he doesn't do anything half speed.

    I did not take his temp untill we got home, since we now have a "Rectal" thermometer I'm going to keep it in my first aid kit.

    Hopefully it was just one of those things that happened, I'll certainly keep a close eye on him from now on.


    I had it happen to my 9 year old female, when she was about 5 we were going to go on a short hour long grouse hunt on a fairly warm day in September I got turned around and it ended up being a 3 hour walk with another dog that didn't know when to quit. We made it back to the truck but she went down right befor we got there. I didn't have AC but there was a stream right there to get her into. And I have never had a problem with her since.
    I just re-read what I typed there and apologize for coming across a bit hostile, wasn't my intent at all. I was just wondering more about the dog and if there may have been more going on there than just the heat?
    "The thing I admire about the rat tail is that it takes commitment. It's not like one day you just decide you want one, you have to grow out that bad boy and you have to repeatedly convince the hairdresser to trust you because it's a great idea."

  7. #17
    Senior Member Todd Caswell's Avatar
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    Dr. Ed, I remember Martin Coffman, DVM, at the time a Eukanuba employee, telling me that one of the best things to do when a dog is overheated is to get his face right in the cold air vent outlet in the vehicle and let him breathe in the coldest AC air you can get.

    His theory as well, was that there is significant heat exchange and cooling impact through breathing. It makes sense that the greater the exposed surface area, the greater the cooling impact.

    Chris

    The minute I put Bodey in the truck he plastered his nose and face up against the vent, and started to recover pretty rapidly after that.




    I just re-read what I typed there and apologize for coming across a bit hostile, wasn't my intent at all. I was just wondering more about the dog and if there may have been more going on there than just the heat?


    No need to apologise Trust me I was thinking the same thing being this had never happened befor and I know he has been pushed harder. I'm still not totally convinced it was just heat and or humidity.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Steve Hester's Avatar
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    High humidity seems to have more to do with a dog overheating than ambient air temp. One of my dogs went down last year on one of those days when it was 80 degrees, but humidity of 90%. He has since worked in much warmer temps with alot less humidity with no problems.
    "A government big enough to give you everything you want, is big enough to take away everything you have." - Thomas Jefferson

  9. #19
    Senior Member jeff t.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Caswell View Post
    The minute I put Bodey in the truck he plastered his nose and face up against the vent, and started to recover pretty rapidly after that.








    No need to apologise Trust me I was thinking the same thing being this had never happened befor and I know he has been pushed harder. I'm still not totally convinced it was just heat and or humidity.
    Todd,

    Have you had the dog tested to determine it's EIC status?
    Jeff Telander
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  10. #20
    Senior Member Todd Caswell's Avatar
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    No I have not Jeff but the Sire is a carrier and the Bitch is clear. So worst case he is a carrier.

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