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Thread: Early neuro stimulation

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    Senior Member TIM DOANE's Avatar
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    Default Early neuro stimulation

    I am looking for the artical or study on early neuro stimulation. I had the website bookmarked but now all I get is " web page can not be found"
    Tim Doane , Kingseed Kennels
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    Senior Member Suzanne Burr's Avatar
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    Just google "early neurological stimulation" and lots of links will pop up. If that doesn't work send me a pm and I can snail mail or fax you a copy.
    I've used it for my litters and it's great, but you must follow the directions and don't deviate from them.

    Suzanne B

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    Senior Member Howard N's Avatar
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    I've had 3 litters and have done it with my last 2. Does it really do anything? I don't see where it hurts but I can't see it actually helping.

    I honestly feel, if you handled every pup every day (and I do) that would do the same thing.

    What do others think?
    Howard Niemi

    You really gotta be careful about how high a pedestal you put your method, your accomplishments, your dog on. There's usually someone who's done more, somewhere. And they may have used a different method than you did! Chris Atkinson 2013

    get your dog out and TRAIN! caryalsobrook 2013

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    Senior Member torg's Avatar
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    I really have not noticed a difference in my pups. As far as all the little stresses creating a better dog, I can't imagine anything more stressful than going through the birth process or having due claws removed. Our pups are handled every day and seem well adjusted.
    I am also curious if anyone else actually sees a benefit from ENS.
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  6. #6
    Kristie Wilder
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    I have never done a "control group", so I have no idea, but here's my thought on it...

    I feel there's a disadvantage in future training when puppies NEVER feel any adversity. For example... If you take a young dog to start force fetch and it's NEVER felt any sort of smack, tap, push or physical correction. I AM not condoning beating your puppies up, let me state that first. What I AM condoning is a little manhandling here and there. We will push the puppies around with our feet if they are in the way (once they're up and about, alert, fully mobile, wild indians). We will give them lip pinches for excessive biting or mouthing (I don't think we've EVER sent a puppy home that bites skin and mouths). As they get older, they get a little swat here and there from the heeling stick... So that when they get into formal training, the initial physical stuff isn't a shock. They don't panic from it. Things go much more smoothly.

    Now, back to ENS. I think this is just an early form of subjecting them to very simple, time-constrained stress. Just a little here, a little there. They claim that it stimulates nerve development. Maybe it does? I don't know. But for me, from my experiences with socializing dogs, introducing them to pressure and moving them into formal training, I feel like it's an introduction to something generally uncomfortable in a very controlled, simple environment just a little at a time...

    I've done it with every litter and would continue to do it. I think it's a little more than "just" handling them every day. I think it's an introduction to some simple stressors and MAYBE in the long run it helps them realize that physical pressure isn't going to kill them. That's my take on it...

    -K

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    Senior Member YardleyLabs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howard N View Post
    I've had 3 litters and have done it with my last 2. Does it really do anything? I don't see where it hurts but I can't see it actually helping.

    I honestly feel, if you handled every pup every day (and I do) that would do the same thing.

    What do others think?
    I tend to agree. I do it as part of my routine but also handle the pups in several different ways every day until they leave. It is clear from experimentation that "challenging" newborns (human or not) in ways that create mild stress stimulates neurological development. If nothing else, the Army's work with ENS may simply demonstrate how little stimulation is actually needed to be effective. A good mom does similar stimulation with her handling of the pups, but breeders definitely need to make sure that pups are handled regularly and challenged a little in the process.

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    Senior Member Paul Rainbolt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howard N View Post
    I've had 3 litters and have done it with my last 2. Does it really do anything? I don't see where it hurts but I can't see it actually helping.

    I honestly feel, if you handled every pup every day (and I do) that would do the same thing.

    What do others think?
    I agree with Howard

  9. #9
    Senior Member HiRollerlabs's Avatar
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    I doubt that any of the pups we've purchased over the years have had special stimulation and they've turned out ok. Once they are with us, they gets lots of stimulation through holding/loving, going on long walks with the rest of the gang, playtime with granddaughter, crate time in the same room with us & sleeping in the bedroom in a crate, stake out with the big dogs, time at the lake, & travelling to trials and tests. They don't get left out of anything and they get corrected if they aren't being good citizens.
    Bob/Ann Heise
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    Senior Member Rainmaker's Avatar
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    I've wondered about it too. I do it every litter, I have 4 adult dogs from litters I've raised plus have kept various pups til 6-8 months once in while to see if I liked the breeding/dog etc, all varying level of reaction to pressure/stress so I can't say how effective it is in that respect. What I can tell is within the litter, as the ENS progresses, how each pup reacts and continues to react to it, some accept it so much faster and just kinda hang out while I do it, some are in the middle, and some struggle right up to day 16 and those little ones, usually only 1 or 2, typically continue to stand out as the "wild" pups, the ones who are always pushing the boundaries, first out of the box, in the limelight so to speak. The ones I watch and say "oh, you are going to be a handful" and so need a particular type of home/environment, which is usually backed up by observation til 7-8 weeks and temp testing at 6weeks as well. It's something I've only recently started to formally chart with pups, so I haven't been doing it very long, but hope I have another 20-30 years to see how it progresses and how the individual pups turn out as adults. I do, however, also believe how they are trained and raised once they leave here has tremendous impact on their adult personality, so it will probably only have real meaning to me with tracking pups I keep that are basically raised in the same environment for the same type of goal (HT). I think ENS is another tool to use but not the be all end all nor the only excuse a breeder should have for handling pups extensively. And I've heard some people say they do it, but skip this step or that one, which makes no sense to me at all, there's a reason it is so formalized.
    Kim Pfister, Rainmaker Labs

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