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Thread: Health care has changed

  1. #1
    Senior Member tpaschal30's Avatar
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    Default Health care has changed

    Third-party payment has required the bureaucratization of medical care and, in the process, has changed the character of the relation between physicians (or other caregivers) and patients. A medical transaction is not simply between a caregiver and a patient; it has to be approved as "covered" by a bureaucrat and the appropriate payment authorized. The patientóthe recipient of the medical careóhas little or no incentive to be concerned about the cost since itís somebody elseís money. The caregiver has become, in effect, an employee of the insurance company or, in the case of Medicare and Medicaid, of the government. The patient is no longer the one, and the only one, the caregiver has to serve. An inescapable result is that the interest of the patient is often in direct conflict with the interest of the caregiverís ultimate employer.

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    Senior Member badbullgator's Avatar
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    I have said similar in numerous post on the topic. Heatlhcare is not broken, how it is paid for is. Insurance dictates what and when most doctors can do and how much they can get paid for it. I have had 7 opperations on my knee, yet since I have been released form my doctors care if I have a problem with my knee I have to fist go to a GP and be refered to my knee doctor. How does that save anyone money? Insurance reform and torte reform would do more for affordable healthcare then government run healthcare
    Views and opinions expressed herein by Badbullgator do not necessarily represent the policies or position of RTF. RTF and all of it's subsidiaries can not be held liable for the off centered humor and politically incorrect comments of the author.
    Corey Burke

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    Senior Member tpaschal30's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by badbullgator View Post
    I have said similar in numerous post on the topic. Heatlhcare is not broken, how it is paid for is. Insurance dictates what and when most doctors can do and how much they can get paid for it. I have had 7 opperations on my knee, yet since I have been released form my doctors care if I have a problem with my knee I have to fist go to a GP and be refered to my knee doctor. How does that save anyone money? Insurance reform and torte reform would do more for affordable healthcare then government run healthcare
    I've had three on my knee, including one replacement. I look good in my speedo!!!

    Leave tort reform alone. Just intoducing market forces would help tremendously!

    Radical reform would, first, end both Medicare and Medicaid, at least for new entrants, and replace them by providing every family in the United States with catastrophic insurance (i.e., a major medical policy with a high deductible). Second, it would end tax exemption of employer-provided medical care. And, third, it would remove the restrictive regulations that are now imposed on medical insuranceóhard to justify with universal catastrophic insurance.

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    Has anyone looked at the package that Dr. Tom Coburn is introducing that allows for choices, and probably is a better system than socialist medicine or what we have now?

    I haven't looked at it.

    I can tell you that my second knee surgery was a nightmare on an HMO because it took over a year to get a referal to the surgeon. Good thing I didn't need something that was life threatening like cancer treatment.
    Terry Britton, P.E.

    Engineers believe that if it isn't broken, it doesn't have enough features yet.

  5. #5
    Senior Member tpaschal30's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Britton View Post
    Has anyone looked at the package that Dr. Tom Coburn is introducing that allows for choices, and probably is a better system than socialist medicine or what we have now?

    I haven't looked at it.

    I can tell you that my second knee surgery was a nightmare on an HMO because it took over a year to get a referal to the surgeon. Good thing I didn't need something that was life threatening like cancer treatment.
    We are over half socialist now. Pricing and outcome information along woth more personal responsibility for payment gives more choices and makes the caregiver responsible to the patient.
    We are on a PPO. Referal for my knee replacement was instant from my GP. Waited a week for the appt. Two weeks later it was done. Very expensive. I would rather have medical care available rather than cheaper and rationed(or unavailable). kind of like gas. When they had price controls, demand stayed high and rationing was implemented.

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    Senior Member dnf777's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tpaschal30 View Post
    I've had three on my knee, including one replacement. I look good in my speedo!!!

    Leave tort reform alone. Just intoducing market forces would help tremendously!

    Radical reform would, first, end both Medicare and Medicaid, at least for new entrants, and replace them by providing every family in the United States with catastrophic insurance (i.e., a major medical policy with a high deductible). Second, it would end tax exemption of employer-provided medical care. And, third, it would remove the restrictive regulations that are now imposed on medical insuranceóhard to justify with universal catastrophic insurance.
    Tort system MUST change. It costs a doctor who has done NOTHING wrong, an average of $50,000 to prove it, and defend a frivilous lawsuit. It costs plaintiff's and their attorneys NOTHING to file a suit. It's like free tickets to the power ball lotto, who would't play??

    The cost of defensive medicine is staggering. Most of it is not even included in the estimates that trial lawyer groups will tout.

    Around where I live, general surgeons pay approx. $80,000 per year in malpractice premiums...if they've DONE NOTHING WRONG. That's not including excise tax called MCARE that runs around 30% of premium. That's a little more than twice the median household income for this area. that money could be much better spent.

    Oh, and if you hear that it's all to "protect" patients, keep in mind that on average, it takes 8 years for any money to hit a patients wallet in cases of malpractice, and only 29 cents on the settlement dollar get there. Too little, too late. Most physicians and groups will recognize true errors, and offer to settle out of court, to everyone's benefit, except the lawyers, so this practice is heavily stifled by state laws in most cases.
    God Bless PFC Jamie Harkness. The US Army's newest PFC, but still our neighbor's little girl!

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    Quote Originally Posted by dnf777 View Post
    Tort system MUST change. It costs a doctor who has done NOTHING wrong, an average of $50,000 to prove it, and defend a frivilous lawsuit. It costs plaintiff's and their attorneys NOTHING to file a suit. It's like free tickets to the power ball lotto, who would't play??

    The cost of defensive medicine is staggering. Most of it is not even included in the estimates that trial lawyer groups will tout.

    Around where I live, general surgeons pay approx. $80,000 per year in malpractice premiums...if they've DONE NOTHING WRONG. That's not including excise tax called MCARE that runs around 30% of premium. That's a little more than twice the median household income for this area. that money could be much better spent.

    Oh, and if you hear that it's all to "protect" patients, keep in mind that on average, it takes 8 years for any money to hit a patients wallet in cases of malpractice, and only 29 cents on the settlement dollar get there. Too little, too late. Most physicians and groups will recognize true errors, and offer to settle out of court, to everyone's benefit, except the lawyers, so this practice is heavily stifled by state laws in most cases.
    I am for a loser pays system. The losing attorney in a lawsuit pays the legal fees of the defense attorney for the doctor. The same should hold true for DA's that go after innocent people just to add a notch on their belt. There seems to be no professional liability in the legal profession when one side goes after somone that has done no wrong. Maybe if the legal professionals had to carry professional liability insurance like doctors do, and when they lose their insurance pays up, there would be less problems do to unethical lawsuits and criminal prosecutions?

    It may cause many in that profession to move to areas that build businesses, and improving our economy.
    Terry Britton, P.E.

    Engineers believe that if it isn't broken, it doesn't have enough features yet.

  8. #8
    Senior Member badbullgator's Avatar
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    One of my friends had a botched boob job, She had an infection and they had to remove and eventually replace them. She did suffer some dammage and pain....................SHE GOT 80 MILLION! in the first settelment. It was later reduced to just 10 million. The first settelment had it held would be 40 million a boob! I can tell you even the 5 million a boob she got was crazy and she even thinks so (of course not giving it back). Heck for 5 million I will have a boob job and they can even screw it up. Some things you deserve money for and in this case she did, but the amount is way out of line with the dammage.
    Another buddy of mine is an eye doctor. He was recently sued and lost 8 million becasue a kid was born with a genetic eye disease that caused it to be born blind. The only way to avoid this would have been if the mother had an abortion, yet somehow he is at fault (I cannot remember all the details, butit had something to do with him not giving her the right advice as to what to do)
    Last edited by badbullgator; 07-16-2009 at 12:42 PM.
    Views and opinions expressed herein by Badbullgator do not necessarily represent the policies or position of RTF. RTF and all of it's subsidiaries can not be held liable for the off centered humor and politically incorrect comments of the author.
    Corey Burke

  9. #9
    Senior Member Franco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dnf777 View Post
    Tort system MUST change. It costs a doctor who has done NOTHING wrong, an average of $50,000 to prove it, and defend a frivilous lawsuit. It costs plaintiff's and their attorneys NOTHING to file a suit. It's like free tickets to the power ball lotto, who would't play??

    The cost of defensive medicine is staggering. Most of it is not even included in the estimates that trial lawyer groups will tout.

    Around where I live, general surgeons pay approx. $80,000 per year in malpractice premiums...if they've DONE NOTHING WRONG. That's not including excise tax called MCARE that runs around 30% of premium. That's a little more than twice the median household income for this area. that money could be much better spent.

    Oh, and if you hear that it's all to "protect" patients, keep in mind that on average, it takes 8 years for any money to hit a patients wallet in cases of malpractice, and only 29 cents on the settlement dollar get there. Too little, too late. Most physicians and groups will recognize true errors, and offer to settle out of court, to everyone's benefit, except the lawyers, so this practice is heavily stifled by state laws in most cases.
    No doubt about it! The only person that gets any real money are the bloodsucking attorneys. Medical Malpractice is a scam and both the doctor and patient suffer.

    I know doctors that have quit practicing because they feel they are working just to pay their insurance premiums.

    We need serious Tort Refrom!
    It's time we abandon our party affiliations and rather than being good Dems or good Repubs we all become good Americans. MJH345

  10. #10
    Senior Member tpaschal30's Avatar
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    Medical malpractice only accounts for about 2% of all health care costs. Much less than the cost of the uninsured by about half. If one can show damages, recourse is a key component of our system. We hear some big settlements, but in the whole scheme of things it is a drop in the bucket.

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