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Thread: Wow! Wonder what Algore thinks of this?

  1. #11
    Senior Member Gerry Clinchy's Avatar
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    Wasn't the question: is it appropriate for the U.S. to relinquish the "control" of the Internet to some international body?

    As was stated ... since the U.S. developed the technology, financed its common usage, and has thus far been very willing to share that technology universally, how much better could it be managed by an international body? We can readily see the political use to which the Olympics and the UN has been put. Would such political manipulation be an advantage for the free use of the Internet?
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  2. #12
    Senior Member YardleyLabs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerry Clinchy View Post
    Wasn't the question: is it appropriate for the U.S. to relinquish the "control" of the Internet to some international body?

    As was stated ... since the U.S. developed the technology, financed its common usage, and has thus far been very willing to share that technology universally, how much better could it be managed by an international body? We can readily see the political use to which the Olympics and the UN has been put. Would such political manipulation be an advantage for the free use of the Internet?
    Gerry,

    The process of giving up control of the Internet started in the late 1990's and was pretty much set in stone during the last administration. A number of factors went into the decision: a desire to transfer financial responsibility from the government to the private sector, a desire to engage a broader range of stakeholders in the process, and concerns that failure to give countries a greater say in the management of their own domains would result in creation of competing structures that would undermine world wide interoperability.

    The first major step in this process actually began with the Gore Bill in 1991, which resulted in a privatization of the management of the network hubs that provide the foundation for the Internet. The next major step, based on legislation in 1998, was the creation of a private, non-profit corporation (ICANN) to assume responsibility for the management of domain names. Legislation to do this was passed under Clinton and responsibilities were moved to the new organization under Bush.

    Even before this process was complete, the previous government funded and managed corporation -- Network Solutions -- saw and end to its government subsidies and its contract with the Department of Commerce that had previously given it total control of all domain naming. The final step in the process is the transfer of responsibilities for management and funding of "root" servers to the new organization. That process began in 2002 with the adoption of a new memorandum of understanding between ICANN and the Department of Commerce. Within a few years, the bulk of all root servers were being managed by private organizations throughout the world. The event noted in the OP's original article was simply another modification in the memorandum of understanding between ICANN and Commerce concerning ICANN's management of responsibility for managing the assignment of blocks of IP addresses and the creation of top level domains (e.g., .COM, .NET, .US, etc.). It did not set any new directions. It only continued what has been going on for more than eight years.

    Even since the Internet was first opened to commerce following the adoption of the Gore Bill, there have been many people concerned about the privatization of what had previously been a completely US government controlled activity. Even under ARPANET, the military was concerned about security problems and split its own networks off from ARPANET, creating what is now known as NIPRnet. However, there is no question but that the privatization of the management of the Internet is what made it possible for the Internet to become the force that it has.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Buzz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by road kill View Post
    If Al Gore had stated that he was a proponent and a key figure in making the internet a useable, accessable public tool I don't think anyone would take issue.

    But I believe he laid claim to "creating" the internet, thereby looking somewhat foolish.

    "During my service in the United States Congress, I took the initiative in creating the Internet. "

    I believe it was from an interview with Wolf.....

    http://www.cnn.com/ALLPOLITICS/stori...ore/index.html


    rk

    Good God man, did you even go read the text of the interview with Blitzer? Here is the question that got Gore into trouble. He made the mistake of stating it in such a way that unethical people could selectively quote him and make it look like he was taking full credit for inventing the internet.


    BLITZER: I want to get to some of the substance of domestic and international issues in a minute, but let's just wrap up a little bit of the politics right now.

    Why should Democrats, looking at the Democratic nomination process, support you instead of Bill Bradley, a friend of yours, a former colleague in the Senate? What do you have to bring to this that he doesn't necessarily bring to this process?

    GORE: Well, I will be offering -- I'll be offering my vision when my campaign begins. And it will be comprehensive and sweeping. And I hope that it will be compelling enough to draw people toward it. I feel that it will be.

    But it will emerge from my dialogue with the American people. I've traveled to every part of this country during the last six years. During my service in the United States Congress, I took the initiative in creating the Internet. I took the initiative in moving forward a whole range of initiatives that have proven to be important to our country's economic growth and environmental protection, improvements in our educational system.

    During a quarter century of public service, including most of it long before I came into my current job, I have worked to try to improve the quality of life in our country and in our world. And what I've seen during that experience is an emerging future that's very exciting, about which I'm very optimistic, and toward which I want to lead.
    Here is a quote from an article, "The Team that Put the Net in Orbit."

    Mr. Gore had been instrumental in introducing legislation, beginning in 1988, to finance what he originally called a “national data highway.”

    “Our corporations are not taking advantage of high-performance computing to enhance their productivity,” Mr. Gore, then a senator, said in an interview at the time. “With greater access to supercomputers, virtually every business in America could achieve tremendous gains.”

    Ultimately, in 1991, his bill to create a National Research and Education Network did pass. Funded by the National Science Foundation, it was instrumental in upgrading the speed of the academic and scientific network backbone leading up to the commercialized Internet.

    “He is a hero in this field,” said Lawrence H. Landweber, a computer scientist at the University of Wisconsin who in 1980 made the pioneering decision to use the basic TCP/IP Internet protocol for CSNET, an academic network that preceded NSFnet and laid the foundation for “internetworking.”
    Since you disagree so much with his ideology, I guess it's impossible to forgive him for phrasing his answer badly or to give him any credit for doing a great thing for the country. But then I guess you'd have to admit that the gooberment does something right once in awhile too.
    Last edited by Buzz; 02-10-2010 at 08:53 PM.
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