The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Outdoor Media
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27

Thread: The Great myth

  1. #1
    Senior Member duckheads's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    618

    Default The Great myth


    FDR's policies prolonged Depression by 7 years, UCLA economists calculate





    By Meg Sullivan August 10, 2004 Category: Research
    Two UCLA economists say they have figured out why the Great Depression dragged on for almost 15 years, and they blame a suspect previously thought to be beyond reproach: President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
    After scrutinizing Roosevelt's record for four years, Harold L. Cole and Lee E. Ohanian conclude in a new study that New Deal policies signed into law 71 years ago thwarted economic recovery for seven long years.
    "Why the Great Depression lasted so long has always been a great mystery, and because we never really knew the reason, we have always worried whether we would have another 10- to 15-year economic slump," said Ohanian, vice chair of UCLA's Department of Economics. "We found that a relapse isn't likely unless lawmakers gum up a recovery with ill-conceived stimulus policies."
    In an article in the August issue of the Journal of Political Economy, Ohanian and Cole blame specific anti-competition and pro-labor measures that Roosevelt promoted and signed into law June 16, 1933.
    "President Roosevelt believed that excessive competition was responsible for the Depression by reducing prices and wages, and by extension reducing employment and demand for goods and services," said Cole, also a UCLA professor of economics. "So he came up with a recovery package that would be unimaginable today, allowing businesses in every industry to collude without the threat of antitrust prosecution and workers to demand salaries about 25 percent above where they ought to have been, given market forces. The economy was poised for a beautiful recovery, but that recovery was stalled by these misguided policies."
    Using data collected in 1929 by the Conference Board and the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Cole and Ohanian were able to establish average wages and prices across a range of industries just prior to the Depression. By adjusting for annual increases in productivity, they were able to use the 1929 benchmark to figure out what prices and wages would have been during every year of the Depression had Roosevelt's policies not gone into effect. They then compared those figures with actual prices and wages as reflected in the Conference Board data.
    In the three years following the implementation of Roosevelt's policies, wages in 11 key industries averaged 25 percent higher than they otherwise would have done, the economists calculate. But unemployment was also 25 percent higher than it should have been, given gains in productivity.
    Meanwhile, prices across 19 industries averaged 23 percent above where they should have been, given the state of the economy. With goods and services that much harder for consumers to afford, demand stalled and the gross national product floundered at 27 percent below where it otherwise might have been.
    "High wages and high prices in an economic slump run contrary to everything we know about market forces in economic downturns," Ohanian said. "As we've seen in the past several years, salaries and prices fall when unemployment is high. By artificially inflating both, the New Deal policies short-circuited the market's self-correcting forces."
    The policies were contained in the National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA), which exempted industries from antitrust prosecution if they agreed to enter into collective bargaining agreements that significantly raised wages. Because protection from antitrust prosecution all but ensured higher prices for goods and services, a wide range of industries took the bait, Cole and Ohanian found. By 1934 more than 500 industries, which accounted for nearly 80 percent of private, non-agricultural employment, had entered into the collective bargaining agreements called for under NIRA.
    Cole and Ohanian calculate that NIRA and its aftermath account for 60 percent of the weak recovery. Without the policies, they contend that the Depression would have ended in 1936 instead of the year when they believe the slump actually ended: 1943.
    Roosevelt's role in lifting the nation out of the Great Depression has been so revered that Time magazine readers cited it in 1999 when naming him the 20th century's second-most influential figure.
    "This is exciting and valuable research," said Robert E. Lucas Jr., the 1995 Nobel Laureate in economics, and the John Dewey Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago. "The prevention and cure of depressions is a central mission of macroeconomics, and if we can't understand what happened in the 1930s, how can we be sure it won't happen again?"
    NIRA's role in prolonging the Depression has not been more closely scrutinized because the Supreme Court declared the act unconstitutional within two years of its passage.
    "Historians have assumed that the policies didn't have an impact because they were too short-lived, but the proof is in the pudding," Ohanian said. "We show that they really did artificially inflate wages and prices."
    Even after being deemed unconstitutional, Roosevelt's anti-competition policies persisted — albeit under a different guise, the scholars found. Ohanian and Cole painstakingly documented the extent to which the Roosevelt administration looked the other way as industries once protected by NIRA continued to engage in price-fixing practices for four more years.
    The number of antitrust cases brought by the Department of Justice fell from an average of 12.5 cases per year during the 1920s to an average of 6.5 cases per year from 1935 to 1938, the scholars found. Collusion had become so widespread that one Department of Interior official complained of receiving identical bids from a protected industry (steel) on 257 different occasions between mid-1935 and mid-1936. The bids were not only identical but also 50 percent higher than foreign steel prices. Without competition, wholesale prices remained inflated, averaging 14 percent higher than they would have been without the troublesome practices, the UCLA economists calculate.
    NIRA's labor provisions, meanwhile, were strengthened in the National Relations Act, signed into law in 1935. As union membership doubled, so did labor's bargaining power, rising from 14 million strike days in 1936 to about 28 million in 1937. By 1939 wages in protected industries remained 24 percent to 33 percent above where they should have been, based on 1929 figures, Cole and Ohanian calculate. Unemployment persisted. By 1939 the U.S. unemployment rate was 17.2 percent, down somewhat from its 1933 peak of 24.9 percent but still remarkably high. By comparison, in May 2003, the unemployment rate of 6.1 percent was the highest in nine years.
    Recovery came only after the Department of Justice dramatically stepped enforcement of antitrust cases nearly four-fold and organized labor suffered a string of setbacks, the economists found.
    "The fact that the Depression dragged on for years convinced generations of economists and policy-makers that capitalism could not be trusted to recover from depressions and that significant government intervention was required to achieve good outcomes," Cole said. "Ironically, our work shows that the recovery would have been very rapid had the government not intervened."
    -UCLA-
    LSMS368

    This was written in 2004 before all of the current stimulus packages, TARPS, and goverment take overs. We are seeing history repeat itself. And just so I clarify myself before Roger and other left wing independants chime in, I DID NOT AGREE WITH GEORGE BUSH WHEN HE STARTED US DOWN THIS SLIPPERY SLOPE.
    CPR HRCH Scott's Sweet Brandy
    Kankakee River HRC
    NRA Life Member
    Pheasants Forever
    Delta Waterfowl

  2. #2
    Senior Member dnf777's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Western Pa
    Posts
    6,161

    Default

    That's funny!
    If anyone mentions Bush, it's milliseconds before they come under attack for bringing up the past, yet its ok to bring up FDR?? Although it makes sense, repubicans have loathed him and social security ever since it was created!
    God Bless PFC Jamie Harkness. The US Army's newest PFC, but still our neighbor's little girl!

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Eastern NC
    Posts
    2,755

    Default

    It's a history lesson, not a blame game like you and Rog play all the time. Big difference, but not to a pot stirrer!

  4. #4
    Senior Member dnf777's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Western Pa
    Posts
    6,161

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ducknwork View Post
    It's a history lesson, not a blame game like you and Rog play all the time. Big difference, but not to a pot stirrer!
    Talking about the economic disaster known as the "Bush Administration" is also a history lesson, albiet a more recent one, but one that many people are poised to forget and repeat!

    So I understand....if democratic follies are discussed, its a history lesson. If republican follies are discussed, its just a blame game. ok.
    God Bless PFC Jamie Harkness. The US Army's newest PFC, but still our neighbor's little girl!

  5. #5
    Senior Member Buzz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Brookings, South Dakota
    Posts
    6,752

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ducknwork View Post
    It's a history lesson, not a blame game like you and Rog play all the time. Big difference, but not to a pot stirrer!
    You should read this carefully. What it is saying is that your wages should be cut significantly.

    Where have I heard that before?
    "For everyone to whom much is given, of him shall much be required." -- Luke 12:48

    Raven - Moneybird's Black Magic Marker***
    (Esprit's Power Play x Trumarc's Lean Cuisine)
    Mick - Moneybird's Jumpin' Jack Flash***
    (Clubmead's Road Warrior x Oakdale Whitewater Devil Dog)
    Peerless - Moneybird's Sole Survivor
    (Two River's Lucky Willie x Moneybird's Black Magic Marker)

  6. #6
    Senior Member tom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Ogden Utah
    Posts
    848

    Default

    It's a shame that there is no respect for anything or anyone on this forum
    Wouldn't mind it if it was just on this forum.
    "there is a principle which is a bar against all information, which is proof against all arguments and which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance --- that principle is contempt prior to investigation."
    Herbert Spencer

  7. #7
    Senior Member road kill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    New Berlin, WI
    Posts
    10,568

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dnf777 View Post
    That's funny!
    If anyone mentions Bush, it's milliseconds before they come under attack for bringing up the past, yet its ok to bring up FDR?? Although it makes sense, repubicans have loathed him and social security ever since it was created!
    That's because you guys (middle of the road independents...hahahahaha) give us a constant non-stop slo-drip whine of Bush hate everyday.

    First time I recall FDR being mentioned in quite a while.


    BTW--the Democrats in command are not concerned about an economic recovery, they know that will happen, they are concerned about slipping in an implementing their ideology as law on an unsuspecting public.



    RK
    Stan b & Elvis

  8. #8
    Senior Member zeus3925's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    West Twin Cities Metro, MN
    Posts
    2,047

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by road kill View Post
    That's because you guys (middle of the road independents...hahahahaha) give us a constant non-stop slo-drip whine of Bush hate everyday.

    First time I recall FDR being mentioned in quite a while.


    BTW--the Democrats in command are not concerned about an economic recovery, they know that will happen, they are concerned about slipping in an implementing their ideology as law on an unsuspecting public.



    RK
    Huh! Ya mean Democrats like Limbaugh, Beck, Coulter, Buchanan, Liddy, Boehner, Gingrich, Paul, that nice Mitch McConnell, etc., and ad nauseum. Those are the ones pushing an agenda by bull, beef and belly ache.
    Zeus

    I don't want to feed an ugly dog!

  9. #9
    Senior Member YardleyLabs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Yardley, PA
    Posts
    6,639

    Default

    Writing an article, and having it be true are two very different things. Unfortunately, when studies are conducted to prove pre-existing political beliefs, the results are sadly predictable. The study mentioned is widely quoted. Unfortunately, other then its original publication in a regional Federal Reserve publication, it is seldom cited outside of conservative publications seeking to bolster arguments against any government intervention in dealing with the Great Bush Recession.

    However, the article itself is a little loosy goosy. Much of its arguments begin from slower than predicted growth in employment following the beginning of Roosevelt policies. However, in concluding that employment growth was too low, the authors explicitly exclude consideration of public employment in temporary jobs with the WPA and similar programs, even though these employed 60% of those who were otherwise unemployed and produced infrastructure improvements that we continue t benefit from today.

    They discard more widely accepted theories for the severity of the Depression based on their belief that these theories do not explain why similar levels of collapse were not experienced in 1920-21 when there was a mini financial crisis involving deflation. This argument is unconvincing since arguing inconsistency with only two data points gives no real basis for evaluating any hypothesis. A better observation might be that all of our economic theories have been "proven" only within very narrow bands of economic performance, and none appears to work well in periods of economic extremes.

    Fundamentally, the authors argue that Roosevelt's policies kept wages too high for the armies of the poor living in "Hoover" cities throughout the country. Presumably, had more people been allowed to starve to death, they might have worked for less than the near starvation wages they otherwise received. Given that my father lived during that period in a single parent household earning $8/week to feed my grandmother (working 60 hours/week) and her seven children, I don't think the economic problem was workers who were earning too much.

    I do not pretend to any expertise in Depression economics. Such analyses are of primarily historical importance since the fundamental structure of our economy has changed radically. The importance of such revisionist studies does not strike me as an effort at serious economic study. Rather, it seems to be an effort to debunk the perception that government intervention can ever be productive since that undermines one of the most fervent ideological tenets of the neo-con movement. The fact that those living at the time viewed conditions as improving as a direct result of public policy and re-elected Roosevelt to an unprecedented three terms only makes the refutation more important.

    Apart from anything else, New Deal policies allowed the US to avoid the move toward fascism that overtook governments in Germany, Spain, and Italy (and would have overtaken France but for WWII). Those policies also allowed us to avoid the Communist takeover experienced in Russia. We were threatened by both and helping people to keep working and eating until the economy recovered was an important reason why.

  10. #10
    Senior Member road kill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    New Berlin, WI
    Posts
    10,568

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by YardleyLabs View Post
    Writing an article, and having it be true are two very different things. Unfortunately, when studies are conducted to prove pre-existing political beliefs, the results are sadly predictable. The study mentioned is widely quoted. Unfortunately, other then its original publication in a regional Federal Reserve publication, it is seldom cited outside of conservative publications seeking to bolster arguments against any government intervention in dealing with the Great Bush Recession.

    However, the article itself is a little loosy goosy. Much of its arguments begin from slower than predicted growth in employment following the beginning of Roosevelt policies. However, in concluding that employment growth was too low, the authors explicitly exclude consideration of public employment in temporary jobs with the WPA and similar programs, even though these employed 60% of those who were otherwise unemployed and produced infrastructure improvements that we continue t benefit from today.

    They discard more widely accepted theories for the severity of the Depression based on their belief that these theories do not explain why similar levels of collapse were not experienced in 1920-21 when there was a mini financial crisis involving deflation. This argument is unconvincing since arguing inconsistency with only two data points gives no real basis for evaluating any hypothesis. A better observation might be that all of our economic theories have been "proven" only within very narrow bands of economic performance, and none appears to work well in periods of economic extremes.

    Fundamentally, the authors argue that Roosevelt's policies kept wages too high for the armies of the poor living in "Hoover" cities throughout the country. Presumably, had more people been allowed to starve to death, they might have worked for less than the near starvation wages they otherwise received. Given that my father lived during that period in a single parent household earning $8/week to feed my grandmother (working 60 hours/week) and her seven children, I don't think the economic problem was workers who were earning too much.

    I do not pretend to any expertise in Depression economics. Such analyses are of primarily historical importance since the fundamental structure of our economy has changed radically. The importance of such revisionist studies does not strike me as an effort at serious economic study. Rather, it seems to be an effort to debunk the perception that government intervention can ever be productive since that undermines one of the most fervent ideological tenets of the neo-con movement. The fact that those living at the time viewed conditions as improving as a direct result of public policy and re-elected Roosevelt to an unprecedented three terms only makes the refutation more important.

    Apart from anything else, New Deal policies allowed the US to avoid the move toward fascism that overtook governments in Germany, Spain, and Italy (and would have overtaken France but for WWII). Those policies also allowed us to avoid the Communist takeover experienced in Russia. We were threatened by both and helping people to keep working and eating until the economy recovered was an important reason why.
    Writing a post, and having it be true are two very different things.

    This is your opinion, or spin, nothing more.



    RK
    Stan b & Elvis

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •