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Thread: Gluten allergies in dogs

  1. #1
    Senior Member HiRollerlabs's Avatar
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    Default Gluten allergies in dogs

    Is anyone aware of studies done on dogs to see if dogs are allergic to gluten? My vet has a dog that has always had chronic stomach problems and bowel issues. He changed to Taste of the Wild (grain free) dog food and the dog has improved.

    If you are aware of any studies on gluten allergies in dogs, please provide a link. Thanks!

    I know some of us RTF'rs have owned dogs with skin issues and felt that grain-free dog foods helped immensely.
    Bob/Ann Heise
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    I have not seen any studies, but we had a hard time finding a food that our yellow male did well on. We tried many very good name brand foods, but he always seemed to have runny stools or more common was what we called a grumpy attitude. He wouldn't want to be petted or played with and he would bark at anything and everything. We tried Diamond All-Naturals Extreme Athlete which is grain free and he is a different dog. The food is all that we changed so right or wrong I'm concluding that it is what made a difference. It worked for us.

  3. #3
    Senior Member tom's Avatar
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    Which gluten? Corn gluten, wheat gluten, rice gluten, they can even make gluten out of potatoes. (which isn't even a grain)

    Sounds to me like you are trying to sell TOTW dog food .

    In reality just as many dogs are allergic to chicken.

    When a dog is having a food related problem, do a sensitivity test and find out what substance/s the dog is allergic to.
    That way the solution is simple instead of being a guessing game.

    Here is the study, but all it says is that some dogs have a sensitvity problem with any given protein, but most do not.

    http://books.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=10668

    dscrption:
    "Updating recommendations last made by the National Research Council in the mid-1980s, this report provides nutrient recommendations based on physical activity and stage in life, major factors that influence nutrient needs. It looks at how nutrients are metabolized in the bodies of dogs and cats, indications of nutrient deficiency, and diseases related to poor nutrition. The report provides a valuable resource for industry professionals formulating diets, scientists setting research agendas, government officials developing regulations for pet food labeling, AND AS A UNIVERSITY TEXTBOOK for dog and cat nutrition. It can also guide pet owners feeding decisions for their pets with information on specific nutrient needs, characteristics of different types of pet foods, and factors to consider when feeding cats and dogs."
    Last edited by tom; 11-09-2010 at 05:08 PM.
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    Senior Member hotel4dogs's Avatar
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    I have an older dog with autoimmune inflammatory bowel disease, and the specialist we worked with told me that protein allergies and/or intolerances are far, far more common in dogs than grain/gluten allergies. The top 2 problem foods for dogs are chicken and beef.

    Barb Gibson
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    CH Rosewood Little Giant UDX VER RA SH MXP MJP OFP VCX WCX CCA CGC FFX-OG
    also UCH HR UUD UJJ URO1 UHIT
    (golden retriever) born 3-10-07
    a.k.a. "Tito", "The Tito Monster"
    www.GoTeamTito.com

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    Senior Member windycanyon's Avatar
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    This guy has some interesting things to say about glutens and health issues (allergies, seizures, HD, etc). http://dogtorj.com/?page_id=100

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    Purina has a new food that is gluten free. It comes in beef, chicken or salmon.

    Even though I no longer have Labs dogs of different breeds seem to have similar problems. I have switched all my Parsons to grain free foods because of coat issues and stained feet from they chewing on them.

    I mix two foods at a time, half and half, and switch off between Blue Buffalo, Taste of the Wild and now the new Purina. I also feed raw at night. Good stools, goods coats, and happy dogs. No more chewing on their feet and no staining around their mouths.

    Cindy R.
    Rustic Terriers, Parson Russell & Australian Terriers
    Fox Fire's Abracadabra
    Ch. Fox Fire Leather "N" Lace
    Benayr Scottish Blend- aka- Brody
    Benayr Rustic Charm - aka- Taylor

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    Senior Member HiRollerlabs's Avatar
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    I've not fed Taste of the Wild. Is it duck? We feed Purina Pro Plan Performance to all of our dogs. Our older dog with the terrible skin issue is gone. But if she were still around I would sure try some other dog foods and go away from grains, and eliminate chicken/beef if it would help. We spent $150 a month on generic Cyclosporine and she had about 4 very good and non-itchy years at the end of her life.

    Tom--not at all promoting any dog food. Just asking a question about gluten and don't care about the source of the gluten. I am hoping for more responses that might be helpful for people who have dogs with stomach, intestinal or skin issues that might be food related.
    Last edited by HiRollerlabs; 11-10-2010 at 08:50 AM.
    Bob/Ann Heise
    "Show up. Dominate. Go home." Dan Gable

    "There is no such thing as perfection. There is always a higher level." Dan Gable


    "Look at pressure as an opportunity." Tom Brands

    "I like to relax with a chainsaw." Tom Brands 2010

    I don't believe in allowing wine to breathe. I prefer mouth-to-wine resuscitation.

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    Senior Member ErinsEdge's Avatar
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    Food testing is not the end all ever, it's what the dog does well on. You will obtain more relevant information from an elimination diet and then add foods back on and see what happens. You should have an immediate reaction if the dog is sensitive to it. Even though the allergists say corn allergies should not be that common, for some reason many dogs have less problems on a corn or grain free diet. You can't argue with that fact. It's why almost all the companies are coming out with corn free formulas. IMHO I believe there are different grades of corn based on quality or allowed molds etc and these dogs may have a sensitivity issue with that.

    I had a young dog in training that started having diarrhea and and then accompanied by some gas. He was on Euk LB Puppy. We tried Native and some supplements but he still had bouts of diarrhea at least once a week and the gas situation was not resolved. Tried the Euk again and huge blow-out so obviously that was not agreeing with him. I brought him home to solve the gas situation which I believed was critical. I researched the foods and switched him to Merrick BG, grain free but it is higher protein (32/15). Many of the grain free diets are too low in protein for a dog in training. I added digestive enzymes, probiotics and Tylan. Everything was fine; however, when I stopped the Tylan he would blow out. In about 6 months he went back in training and he didn't have to get the Tylan anymore. He is on the same diet with enzymes and probiotics probably for life but it agrees with him and no gas. I think that there may be other substances dogs are sensitive to in diets than allergy testing will reveal. I'm not pushing the food but do what works with your dog. That's what worked for mine.
    Nancy P



    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

  9. #9
    Senior Member tom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HiRollerlabs View Post
    Tom--not at all promoting any dog food. Just asking a question about gluten and don't care about the source of the gluten. I am hoping for more responses that might be helpful for people who have dogs with stomach, intestinal or skin issues that might be food related.
    My point s that it s not the "gluten" that a dog would be allergic to, it is the source of the gluten that would cause the problem. Wheat gluten is the most common used in dog foods.
    If a dog is allergic to a specific grain, it will be allergic to that grain in any form (gluten, meal, whole, oil, or extract)

    If the dog is allergic to wheat, eliminating the corn will not solve the problem, and would be unnecessary.
    While eliminating all grains would solve the problem, it is kinda like throwing the baby out with the bath water.
    Last edited by tom; 11-10-2010 at 09:43 AM.
    "there is a principle which is a bar against all information, which is proof against all arguments and which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance --- that principle is contempt prior to investigation."
    Herbert Spencer

  10. #10
    Senior Member HiRollerlabs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ErinsEdge View Post
    I researched the foods and switched him to Merrick BG, grain free but it is higher protein (32/15). Many of the grain free diets are too low in protein for a dog in training. I added digestive enzymes, probiotics and Tylan. Everything was fine; however, when I stopped the Tylan he would blow out. In about 6 months he went back in training and he didn't have to get the Tylan anymore. He is on the same diet with enzymes and probiotics probably for life but it agrees with him and no gas. I think that there may be other substances dogs are sensitive to in diets than allergy testing will reveal. I'm not pushing the food but do what works with your dog. That's what worked for mine.
    Nancy,
    I talked with a Purina rep about the corn in the Pro Plan Performance and he said the reason for the corn is to provide the high-carb needed for the performance/field trial dogs. Good info on the higher protein/grain free dog food & the supplements. Thanks. Ann
    Bob/Ann Heise
    "Show up. Dominate. Go home." Dan Gable

    "There is no such thing as perfection. There is always a higher level." Dan Gable


    "Look at pressure as an opportunity." Tom Brands

    "I like to relax with a chainsaw." Tom Brands 2010

    I don't believe in allowing wine to breathe. I prefer mouth-to-wine resuscitation.

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