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Thread: Republicans Making Jobs

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    Senior Member menmon's Avatar
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    Default Republicans Making Jobs

    I'm please to announce that having only been on the job a few hours; the republicans are creating jobs and turning the economy arround

    The ADP Employment payroll survey revealed a surprisingly hefty 297k December gain that implies upside risk to our December private payroll forecast, which we boosted to 180k from 150k, alongside a boost in our total nonfarm payroll forecast to 170k. The December ADP surge followed a small downward November revision from 93k to 92k, that only slightly narrowed the atypical overshot of November's lean 50k private payroll increase; though a boost in Friday's payroll data for November as well may further remove this aberration. The December ADP gain included a 27k rise for jobs among goods producers with a 23k factory employment gain, and a 270k rise in service employment that accounted for the bulk of the December ADP pop. The ADP figures have undershot private payrolls in eleven of the last thirteen months, leaving a 96k downward bias in the as-reported data in 2010 versus a 15k average undershoot in 2009, which makes today's December pop even more significant. We have even seen a 75k average gap over the last three months despite the November overshoot.
    Last edited by menmon; 01-06-2011 at 08:52 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sambo View Post
    I please to announce that having only been on the job a few hours and the republicans are creating jobs and turning the economy arround

    The ADP Employment payroll survey revealed a surprisingly hefty 297k December gain that implies upside risk to our December private payroll forecast, which we boosted to 180k from 150k, alongside a boost in our total nonfarm payroll forecast to 170k. The December ADP surge followed a small downward November revision from 93k to 92k, that only slightly narrowed the atypical overshot of November's lean 50k private payroll increase; though a boost in Friday's payroll data for November as well may further remove this aberration. The December ADP gain included a 27k rise for jobs among goods producers with a 23k factory employment gain, and a 270k rise in service employment that accounted for the bulk of the December ADP pop. The ADP figures have undershot private payrolls in eleven of the last thirteen months, leaving a 96k downward bias in the as-reported data in 2010 versus a 15k average undershoot in 2009, which makes today's December pop even more significant. We have even seen a 75k average gap over the last three months despite the November overshoot.
    let me guess - your new job is being an English teacher????

    and who says undocumented workers dont have a chance in america??????? LOL!!!
    Last edited by david gibson; 01-05-2011 at 04:36 PM.

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    Senior Member menmon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sambo View Post
    I'm please to announce that having only been on the job a few hours; the republicans are creating jobs and turning the economy arround

    The ADP Employment payroll survey revealed a surprisingly hefty 297k December gain that implies upside risk to our December private payroll forecast, which we boosted to 180k from 150k, alongside a boost in our total nonfarm payroll forecast to 170k. The December ADP surge followed a small downward November revision from 93k to 92k, that only slightly narrowed the atypical overshot of November's lean 50k private payroll increase; though a boost in Friday's payroll data for November as well may further remove this aberration. The December ADP gain included a 27k rise for jobs among goods producers with a 23k factory employment gain, and a 270k rise in service employment that accounted for the bulk of the December ADP pop. The ADP figures have undershot private payrolls in eleven of the last thirteen months, leaving a 96k downward bias in the as-reported data in 2010 versus a 15k average undershoot in 2009, which makes today's December pop even more significant. We have even seen a 75k average gap over the last three months despite the November overshoot.
    Better! It was breaking news I did not have time to show it to my editor

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    Quote Originally Posted by sambo View Post
    Better! It was breaking news I did not have time to show it to my editor
    What does the jobs report say today???


    RK
    Stan b & Elvis

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    Senior Member menmon's Avatar
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    Fewer Americans filed claims for unemployment insurance payments over the past month, indicating the labor market is improving.

    The average number of applications for jobless benefits over the past four weeks dropped to 410,750, the lowest level since July 2008, Labor Department figures showed today in Washington. Claims for the week ended Jan. 1 rose by 18,000 to 409,000, in line with the median forecast of economists surveyed by Bloomberg News.

    Firings have been waning in recent weeks, a necessary step toward gains in hiring that will help boost consumer spending, which accounts for 70 percent of the economy. A report tomorrow is projected to show employers added to payrolls in December for a third month as the U.S. expansion gained speed.

    “The recovery in the labor market is continuing to move along at a gradual pace,” said Omair Sharif, an economist at RBS Securities Inc. in Stamford, Connecticut, who forecast claims would rise to 410,000. “Employers are getting to the point where they are becoming a little more confident about the strength of the recovery.”

    Stock-index futures trimmed earlier gains following the report. The contract on the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index maturing in March rose 0.2 percent to 1,274.3 at 8:44 a.m. in New York. Treasury securities rose, sending the yield on the benchmark 10- year note down to 3.43 percent from 3.47 percent late yesterday.

    The median forecast, based on predictions of 36 economists in a Bloomberg survey, called for claims to rise to 408,000 last week from a two-year low of 388,000 the prior week. Estimates ranged from 360,000 to 450,000. The Labor Department today revised the prior week’s figure to 391,000.

    Nothing Unusual

    A Labor Department spokesman said there was nothing unusual in last week’s figures as the report was released. The second week in January usually marks the high point in claims before they are seasonally adjusted, he said, reflecting dismissals of temporary workers following the holidays.

    Economists track the four-week average because it’s a less volatile measure than the weekly figures and gives a better indication of the overall trend.

    The number of people continuing to receive jobless benefits fell by 47,000 in the week ended Dec. 25 to 4.1 million. The continuing claims figure does not include the number of Americans receiving extended benefits under federal programs.

    Those who’ve used up their traditional benefits and are now collecting emergency and extended payments decreased by about 23,000 to 4.51 million in the week ended Dec. 18.

    Steady Rate

    The unemployment rate among people eligible for benefits held at 3.3 percent in the week ended Dec. 25.

    Twenty states and territories reported a decline in claims, while 33 reported an increase. These data are reported with a one-week lag.

    California showed the biggest jump in applications, a 15,972 increase, and cited increased firings at transportation, construction and manufacturing firms.

    Initial jobless claims reflect weekly firings and tend to fall as job growth -- measured by the monthly non-farm payrolls report -- accelerates. That relationship has broken down in recent months as some companies continue to cut staff while others expand, indicating an uneven rebound.

    “Conditions in the labor market appeared to be improving on balance,” Federal Reserve officials said in minutes of their Dec. 14 meeting released this week. Even so, “the pace of hiring was still sluggish,” and the jobless rate “stayed at a high level,” they said.

    More Jobs

    Companies taking on workers include Goodlettsville, Tennessee-based Dollar General Corp., the biggest of the U.S. dollar discount stores, which plans to add 6,000 jobs as it opens 625 stores this year.

    Some are still paring staff. AK Steel Holding Corp. the third-largest U.S. steelmaker, on Dec. 28 said it is closing a Kentucky coke plant to reduce costs. The shutdown of the Ashland facility, which has 263 employees, will be completed early in the second quarter, West Chester, Ohio-based AK Steel said.

    Figures from ADP Employer Services yesterday showed companies increased employment by 297,000 in December, the most since records began in 2001 and exceeding the highest projection in a Bloomberg survey.

    Monthly payroll figures, due tomorrow from the Labor Department, may show employers added 150,000 jobs in December following a gain of 39,000 in November. The unemployment rate may have fallen to 9.7 percent, the first decline in six months.

    President Barack Obama in December signed into law an $858 billion bill extending for two years Bush-era tax cuts for all income levels. It also continues expanded jobless insurance benefits to the long-term unemployed for 13 months and reduces payroll taxes for workers by two percentage points during 2011.

    To contact the reporter on this story: Shobhana Chandra in Washington at schandra1@bloomberg.net

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    Quote Originally Posted by sambo View Post
    Fewer Americans filed claims for unemployment insurance payments over the past month, indicating the labor market is improving.

    The average number of applications for jobless benefits over the past four weeks dropped to 410,750, the lowest level since July 2008, Labor Department figures showed today in Washington. Claims for the week ended Jan. 1 rose by 18,000 to 409,000, in line with the median forecast of economists surveyed by Bloomberg News.

    Firings have been waning in recent weeks, a necessary step toward gains in hiring that will help boost consumer spending, which accounts for 70 percent of the economy. A report tomorrow is projected to show employers added to payrolls in December for a third month as the U.S. expansion gained speed.

    “The recovery in the labor market is continuing to move along at a gradual pace,” said Omair Sharif, an economist at RBS Securities Inc. in Stamford, Connecticut, who forecast claims would rise to 410,000. “Employers are getting to the point where they are becoming a little more confident about the strength of the recovery.”

    Stock-index futures trimmed earlier gains following the report. The contract on the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index maturing in March rose 0.2 percent to 1,274.3 at 8:44 a.m. in New York. Treasury securities rose, sending the yield on the benchmark 10- year note down to 3.43 percent from 3.47 percent late yesterday.

    The median forecast, based on predictions of 36 economists in a Bloomberg survey, called for claims to rise to 408,000 last week from a two-year low of 388,000 the prior week. Estimates ranged from 360,000 to 450,000. The Labor Department today revised the prior week’s figure to 391,000.

    Nothing Unusual

    A Labor Department spokesman said there was nothing unusual in last week’s figures as the report was released. The second week in January usually marks the high point in claims before they are seasonally adjusted, he said, reflecting dismissals of temporary workers following the holidays.

    Economists track the four-week average because it’s a less volatile measure than the weekly figures and gives a better indication of the overall trend.

    The number of people continuing to receive jobless benefits fell by 47,000 in the week ended Dec. 25 to 4.1 million. The continuing claims figure does not include the number of Americans receiving extended benefits under federal programs.

    Those who’ve used up their traditional benefits and are now collecting emergency and extended payments decreased by about 23,000 to 4.51 million in the week ended Dec. 18.

    Steady Rate

    The unemployment rate among people eligible for benefits held at 3.3 percent in the week ended Dec. 25.

    Twenty states and territories reported a decline in claims, while 33 reported an increase. These data are reported with a one-week lag.

    California showed the biggest jump in applications, a 15,972 increase, and cited increased firings at transportation, construction and manufacturing firms.

    Initial jobless claims reflect weekly firings and tend to fall as job growth -- measured by the monthly non-farm payrolls report -- accelerates. That relationship has broken down in recent months as some companies continue to cut staff while others expand, indicating an uneven rebound.

    “Conditions in the labor market appeared to be improving on balance,” Federal Reserve officials said in minutes of their Dec. 14 meeting released this week. Even so, “the pace of hiring was still sluggish,” and the jobless rate “stayed at a high level,” they said.

    More Jobs

    Companies taking on workers include Goodlettsville, Tennessee-based Dollar General Corp., the biggest of the U.S. dollar discount stores, which plans to add 6,000 jobs as it opens 625 stores this year.

    Some are still paring staff. AK Steel Holding Corp. the third-largest U.S. steelmaker, on Dec. 28 said it is closing a Kentucky coke plant to reduce costs. The shutdown of the Ashland facility, which has 263 employees, will be completed early in the second quarter, West Chester, Ohio-based AK Steel said.

    Figures from ADP Employer Services yesterday showed companies increased employment by 297,000 in December, the most since records began in 2001 and exceeding the highest projection in a Bloomberg survey.

    Monthly payroll figures, due tomorrow from the Labor Department, may show employers added 150,000 jobs in December following a gain of 39,000 in November. The unemployment rate may have fallen to 9.7 percent, the first decline in six months.

    President Barack Obama in December signed into law an $858 billion bill extending for two years Bush-era tax cuts for all income levels. It also continues expanded jobless insurance benefits to the long-term unemployed for 13 months and reduces payroll taxes for workers by two percentage points during 2011.

    To contact the reporter on this story: Shobhana Chandra in Washington at schandra1@bloomberg.net
    I believe, if you check, the actual number is closer to 300,000.

    What would you attribute that to??

    Just askin'.....
    Stan b & Elvis

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    Senior Member menmon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by road kill View Post
    I believe, if you check, the actual number is closer to 300,000.

    What would you attribute that to??

    Just askin'.....
    I took it from Bloomberg.

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    RK, you just needed to reread the paragraph before the one you selected.


    Quote Originally Posted by sambo View Post
    Figures from ADP Employer Services yesterday showed companies increased employment by 297,000 in December, the most since records began in 2001 and exceeding the highest projection in a Bloomberg survey.

    Monthly payroll figures, due tomorrow from the Labor Department, may show employers added 150,000 jobs in December following a gain of 39,000 in November. The unemployment rate may have fallen to 9.7 percent, the first decline in six months.
    Here is a picture to put it in perspective.

    "For everyone to whom much is given, of him shall much be required." -- Luke 12:48

    Raven - Moneybird's Black Magic Marker***
    (Esprit's Power Play x Trumarc's Lean Cuisine)
    Mick - Moneybird's Jumpin' Jack Flash***
    (Clubmead's Road Warrior x Oakdale Whitewater Devil Dog)
    Peerless - Moneybird's Sole Survivor
    (Two River's Lucky Willie x Moneybird's Black Magic Marker)

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    awesome. the graph shows we are well on the road to recovery. its about time.

    now some here are going to say its all to obamas credit, we just needed to be patient.

    others that after the election the faith was restored to employers and they felt more confident expanding their workforces knowing power was wrested away from the dems and obama would now be held in check a bit.

    personally, i feel its a little of both. the improvement was being primed somewhat by the stimulus, but employers dont feel like it would be self sustaining because of the runaway debt incurred. it took the election to free up the confidence because the employers feel safer.

    and then now we have panic over future fuel and food costs......who will get that blame?

  10. #10
    Senior Member menmon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by david gibson View Post
    awesome. the graph shows we are well on the road to recovery. its about time.

    now some here are going to say its all to obamas credit, we just needed to be patient.

    others that after the election the faith was restored to employers and they felt more confident expanding their workforces knowing power was wrested away from the dems and obama would now be held in check a bit.

    personally, i feel its a little of both. the improvement was being primed somewhat by the stimulus, but employers dont feel like it would be self sustaining because of the runaway debt incurred. it took the election to free up the confidence because the employers feel safer.

    and then now we have panic over future fuel and food costs......who will get that blame?
    I still see run away debt as a businessman, but I'm smart enough not to believe the republican BS.

    Things are just getting better and for the last 2 years people with a political agenda wanted you to think it wasn't. The point of this post was to maybe cast a little light on it. After the election, funny how the economy's problems went away. No matter how bad they do, the agenda will be to tell you how great things are so Obama will get 4 more years, because to promote themselves they have to promote him. Funny how this shit works.

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