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Thread: Hip Dysplasia?

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    Senior Member Bradybuck's Avatar
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    Default Hip Dysplasia?

    I have a few questions?

    Is it a purely inherited defect?

    If it is inherited how do dogs with develop HD with pedigrees of all good-excellent rated hips?

    Should dogs continue to be tested for HD every year after they are 24 months?

    Can an a dog at 24 months have good-excellent rated hips develop HD later in life?

    If they can should breeders be having their dogs retested and rated regularly after the original 24 month rating? Is this common practice already?

    Do a pup's chances of developing HD increase if it was raised in a home with hardwood or other slippery type floors?

  2. #2
    Senior Member ErinsEdge's Avatar
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    Senior Member Tobias's Avatar
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    I think it is fairly accepted that if a dog develops HD after 2 yrs of age, it is due to other than genetic reasons. (injury)
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    I read an article that was exploring the idea that the kennel flooring and surroundings a pup is exposed to during its early life could increase our decrease their chance of HD. Slippery floors and jumping/slipping may cause issues of development? I'll see if I can track it down and post a link.
    Here's the link: just information, some seems reasonable, other seems questionable.
    http://www.instituteofcaninebiology....-hip-dysplasia
    Last edited by bshaf; 02-04-2016 at 09:10 AM. Reason: Added link
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    Senior Member ErinsEdge's Avatar
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    I have always made sure that newborn pups, and pups in the whelping box, are on a surface covering they can grip as opposed to a bare surface with a few shreds of newspaper. I see pictures of pups in swimming pools. Most of the time buyers have no idea what the pups are raised on.

    I do think that #3 in that article is misleading because it appears we have not made any progress, because bad hip xrays are often not sent in. I have had dogs that jump excessively in a run and they still OFA out excellent so I don't think environment is as much of a factor as they are pushing. I do think excessive work with very young pups (< 6 mo) can be problematic. I think being very careful with the environment can delay HD but if they are going to be dysplastic, they still will end up being so. I have selected for good/excellent OFA hips and it has worked for me for over 35 years.
    Nancy P



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    Senior Member hotel4dogs's Avatar
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    The only way you could be certain that the dogs were passing along "good" hip genes would be to test every dog from every litter for multiple generations.

    If you had a litter of 10, and only checked 1, and that 1 had "excellent" hips, you really don't know too much. For all you know, the other 9 had HD, so obviously the genetics don't favor good hips.
    Conversely, if you had all 10 checked, and 9 had "excellent" hips and 1 had HD, you probably have good hip genetics going on.

    So while the parents passing hip clearances does help, it can't insure that you won't produce pups with HD.

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    Senior Member Bridget Bodine's Avatar
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    A dogs weight and environmental elements (floor , jumping etc) may exacerbate and / or accelerate HD in a dog that is already predisposed to it. Slippery floors are never good , especially if the dog runs and slides on them .
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    Senior Member Erin Lynes's Avatar
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    HD is about 30% heritable.

    Management issues that are known to contribute to the expression of HD (greatest effect on a young puppy)
    - poor footing
    - obesity
    - improper exercise or extreme lack of exercise
    - spay/neuter prior to maturity

    The genetic part of HD is controlled by several genes who have not all yet been correctly identified. When we x-ray dogs to determine if there is HD, it's not a genetic test. We are checking their phenotype to see if they are expressing the disease that time. The grade that OFA issues is essentially a prognosis- the chance that the dog itself will be free of HD throughout life.

    It is certainly possible to have a dog who does not express HD themselves, who may have a higher risk of producing dysplastic puppies, simply based on the polygenic nature of the condition and how management affects expression. Continuing to x-ray the same dog after they've matured would be unlikely to provide greater insight into that possibility. Tracking their offspring's results does help to reveal it though.

    Cornell has developed a database for Estimated Breeding Values for sires and dams based on accumulated data from their relatives and offspring and the incidence of dysplasia, to accumulate a score for a particular animal. They use OFA data for this database. The last time I checked, it was not yet all the way up to date but they were promising to fund further updates if more breeders would register to make use of it (which is free to do, by the way). https://secure.vet.cornell.edu/bvhip/BVSearch.aspx
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