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Thread: Warning Of Food Price Riots In The UK

  1. #11
    Senior Member luvmylabs23139's Avatar
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    They wanted $2.79 for a head of iceberg lettuce today at the store. Double what I am used to paying for it. Needless to say I did not buy it, and they looked like crap.
    Hihope Hiland Heathen of Perth CD, RE, CGC, TDI

  2. #12
    Senior Member BrianW's Avatar
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    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...7-nations.html

    Food prices in Britain are rising three times faster than G7 nations

    Food prices in Britain are rising at three times the rate of the world’s seven biggest economies.

    Figures from the OECD put UK food inflation at 6.3 per cent, well ahead of the average of 2.1 per cent for the G7 group of nations.

    There is a suggestion that the ‘big four’ supermarkets – Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Asda and Morrisons – have used concerns about increasing global commodity prices to push through unfair increases.

    Research by analysts at UBS shows commodity inflation would"justify"a 3 to 3.5 per cent rise in processed food prices, but UK supermarkets have lifted prices by 6 to 6.5 per cent.


    "Justify "unfair" increases." Hmmm. Sounds like price controls are next.
    Anyone care to discuss how well that's worked in GB?

    Will that be what PBO's eventual issue acknowledgment will address? Excessive profiteering?

    Or that maybe corn is more important to eat than to drive with?




    "It's not that government is inherently stupid, although that's a debatable question."
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    I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it. Thomas Jefferson to Archibald Stuart, 1791
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  3. #13
    Senior Member luvmylabs23139's Avatar
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    by TONY BURBECK / NewsChannel 36
    Bio | Email| Follow: @TonyBurbeck
    WCNC.com
    Posted on March 16, 2011 at 6:17 PM



    CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Grocery bills are creating the same sticker shock as gas prices.
    Food prices rose nearly four percent in one month and it is the biggest monthly increase since 1974 – the same year President Richard Nixon resigned over Watergate.
    Vegetables are leading the surge, up 49 percent in some instances.
    It's not the best timing in the world.
    Joan Menzo's daughter decided that she is vegan the same time fruit and vegetable prices are rising.
    "It costs more to be healthy, that’s why I’m here getting fruits and vegetables instead of going to the grocery store where it’s going to be a lot more money,” Menzo said.
    By ‘here’ she means she is at the Charlotte Regional Farmers Market, where shoppers can usually find low prices.
    "We used to sell $1.29, $1.49, now we sell $1.99,” said Khamla Vong with Veggie On The Run Produce.
    "Carrots and spinach, cauliflower, tomatoes have gone up," she says.
    She says prices have gone up about 20 cents a pound the last two weeks.
    She cites three main factors for the higher prices; the cost to produce, weather and gas.
    Driving produce from the farm in Kings Mountain to the Farmers Market used to cost $300 a week.
    "Right now it's $500 to $600,” Vong said.
    It's not just fruits and veggies that have seen a price bump.
    "Porterhouses, T-bones have gone up,” said New York Butcher Shop manager Keith Roybal. "Chicken has gone up dramatically too. You’re not talking just cents; you’re talking dollars for chicken.”
    Roybal says prices are fluctuating from a quarter to a dollar a pound, depending upon the cut. He says the cost of getting livestock from the farm to your plate is driving the increase. Wednesday he paid a delivery surcharge to a poultry supplier.
    "$1.60 to bring the chicken here,” Roybal said.
    The bags shoppers walk out with cost more too because plastic is made from petroleum.
    Vong said a box of bags is up about $25 dollars over a two year span.
    "Shrink wrap, plastic latex gloves have gone up,” Roybal said.
    Overall, Menzo says she's spending a good $20 more per week on groceries than she used to spend.
    "I'm not ok with it but I don't have a choice,” she said. “I have to eat."
    Both Vong and Roybal say they are passing on the price to stay in business, but they also say the minute they can lower a price, they do it.
    Hihope Hiland Heathen of Perth CD, RE, CGC, TDI

  4. #14
    Senior Member BrianW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDogger View Post
    My food bill is out-weighed each month by my internet bill, my cell phone bill, my TV bill.
    Gas and elec., still pretty reasonable.
    Hope your cell phone, iPad or whatever has a good app to make it look/taste like beef jerky or something.

    There's been talk recently about PBO opening the Strategic Petroleum Reserve to lower oil prices, but noticably, none about a strategic grain reserve.

    Because there isn't one. All of our surplus wheat etc has been given away. Some said it was too costly to keep reserves so we paid farmers & ranchers not to produce instead. Now that times of plenty are turning to lean, where will we turn to feed our coming hungry?
    "It's not that government is inherently stupid, although that's a debatable question."
    Rand Paul CPAC speech 2011

    I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it. Thomas Jefferson to Archibald Stuart, 1791
    ________________________________________
    Proud partner of (HR) WR SR Brian's 44Magnum Monster
    co-owned by HR Rianne's 2nd Chance Hurricane Rebel

  5. #15
    Senior Member JDogger's Avatar
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    [quote=BrianW;769667]Hope your cell phone, iPad or whatever has a good app to make it look/taste like beef jerky or something. My point, Brian, is that the cost of food in the USA, today, is more affordable than our other nessecities. Luvvy bitches about the price of lettuce. Just afew years ago produce was not a globally traded commodity. In the winter we had apples, not oranges and plums and grapes from Chile, Australia and other southern hemisphere locals. We've gotten spoiled. We expect to pay the same for strawberries year round. It don't happen that way.

    There's been talk recently about PBO opening the Strategic Petroleum Reserve to lower oil prices, but noticably, none about a strategic grain reserve. Where do you hear about opening the SPR to lower oil prices? The reason there is no widespead grain reserves is that it doesn't keep. Plus oil is a finite commodity, whereas grain is not. You can grow more. You cannot make more cheap oil just appear. If grain is produced in overabundance the price drops. The producer fails to make a profit

    Because there isn't one. All of our surplus wheat etc has been given away. To who, and where Some said it was too costly to keep reserves so we paid farmers & ranchers not to produce instead. Now that times of plenty are turning to lean, where will we turn to feed our coming hungry?Well, you might grow a garden, can and freeze. But no.... you want the government to do it all for you. Are you really sure you're a conservative?[/quote]
    JD

    I agree, farm subsidies to not produce are not a very good idea
    One cannot reason someone out of something they were not reasoned into. - Jonathan Swift

  6. #16
    Senior Member BrianW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDogger View Post
    Hope your cell phone, iPad or whatever has a good app to make it look/taste like beef jerky or something.
    My point, Brian, is that the cost of food in the USA, today, is more affordable than our other nessecities. Luvvy bitches about the price of lettuce. Just afew years ago produce was not a globally traded commodity. In the winter we had apples, not oranges and plums and grapes from Chile, Australia and other southern hemisphere locals. We've gotten spoiled. We expect to pay the same for strawberries year round. It don't happen that way.

    You have your choices to make on what to spend your money on, what your "necessities" are, for now. That's great for you and I hope it works. But if things keep going as is we, as household & families, may have to decide for ourselves "Well, is it internet service this month or a gal of milk, box of cornflakes, loaf of bread and a pound of burger.

    Yeah, we've gotten spoiled all right. Spoiled into thinking it will always be there and we'll be able to afford it when it it. So that way too many folks, either by choice or necessity have no backup like our grandparents and such did.


    There's been talk recently about PBO opening the Strategic Petroleum Reserve to lower oil prices, but noticeably, none about a strategic grain reserve. Where do you hear about opening the SPR to lower oil prices? The reason there is no widespead grain reserves is that it doesn't keep. Plus oil is a finite commodity, whereas grain is not. You can grow more. You cannot make more cheap oil just appear. If grain is produced in overabundance the price drops. The producer fails to make a profit
    You haven't heard any of the news of Dems urging PBO to get into the SPR?!?
    That's great that there is that choice. There is none on food.
    Yes, you "can" grow more IF conditions are right. IF there are no major floods in the Mid-West. http://www.kansas.com/2011/03/11/175...-flooding.html
    In a probable shorter growing season http://www.longrangeweather.com/Weather-Forecasts.htm#

    You cannot make food "just appear" either.

    Because there isn't one. All of our surplus wheat etc has been given away. To who, and where
    http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/food/2008-05-01-usda-food-supply_N.htm
    http://www.fourwinds10.com/siterun_d...p?q=1212803067

    Some said it was too costly to keep reserves so we paid farmers & ranchers not to produce instead. Now that times of plenty are turning to lean, where will we turn to feed our coming hungry?Well, you might grow a garden, can and freeze.
    Where are all the people that live in NYC, Seattle apartments and postage stamp lots/homes going to grow thers? What does one eat for the 6 months of grow time?

    But no.... you want the government to do it all for you. Are you really sure you're a conservative?
    [/quote]
    JD

    I agree, farm subsidies to not produce are not a very good idea
    No, I don't want to government to do it all for me.
    What I am saying though, is that there are far too many that do!
    Liberals fall over themselves supporting the govt's "promote the general welfare" clause for anything. And real "gw needs" are not high speed internet for everyone, but food definitely could be argued as one. So now that as supplies dry up and as prices rise, the 40 million some people, in our country alone, that are on food stamps & other assistance are going to demand govt food from "somewhere".
    Only there is no "somewhere" left.
    The govt can't hand out cheese, powdered milk etc like in the past even if they wanted too.
    It's gone.

    There are reports that even Abu Dubai and Pakistan have food reserves for their people for about a year or 2. But we don't, not anymore.

    When there is nothing to be "bought" in the stores with the food stamp EBT card and no trucks outside handing out milk, the govt is only going to have 2 choices to manage this manufactured crisis and feed "the general welfare".

    Increase supply. There is only one real source. The folks who were responsible/resourceful enough to store.
    OR
    Reduce demand.

    Neither one sounds too attractive from here.
    "It's not that government is inherently stupid, although that's a debatable question."
    Rand Paul CPAC speech 2011

    I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it. Thomas Jefferson to Archibald Stuart, 1791
    ________________________________________
    Proud partner of (HR) WR SR Brian's 44Magnum Monster
    co-owned by HR Rianne's 2nd Chance Hurricane Rebel

  7. #17
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    Traces of radiation are tainting vegetables and some water supplies, although in amounts the government and health experts say do not pose a risk to human health in the short-term. China, Japan's biggest trading partner, ordered testing of Japanese food imports for radiation contamination.




    "Please do not overreact, and act calmly," said Chief Cabinet spokesman Yukio Edano in the government's latest appeal to ease public concerns. "Even if you eat contaminated vegetables several times, it will not harm your health at all."
    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42188697...s-asiapacific/

    Anyone interested in buying milk and vegetables from Japan-- cheap????

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