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Thread: Volt a Dud? Hey Blackstone whats's the deal?

  1. #21
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    Franco,

    I know you have been waiting for a CNG pickup. That still might be a ways off. There is still a problem with CNG availability. I looked at getting a dedicate CNG van from MI to Kansas City. If I can get it to St. Louis, I can fill up there, and make it to KC. However, with a 300 mile range, it will be cutting it too close for comfort trying to get to St. Louis. The other problem is many of the stations are not readily open to the public. With some of them, you have to call ahead to make a reservation to get fuel. Unless companies are willing to make a significant investment in infrastructure, CNG is going to have a tough time gaining popularity. Traveling across country right now requires a lot of advanced planning, and fuel may not be available in a lot of places. In addition, currently the upfit for a CNG system is about $11k - $14k (at least on cargo vans). Now that the Fed tax credit has expired, that’s a hard pill to swallow. One more obstacle will be the number of tanks needed, and tank placement. If you want a 300 mile range with CNG, it’s probably going to take 4 tanks, and at least one will probably have to be mounted in the bed of the truck, taking up usable space.

    The only viable option would be a bi-fuel system that would allow you to run on CNG and gasoline. There are some systems out there, but they are pretty expensive too. Then, there are the warranty issues caused by having a 3rd party install an aftermarket system. It’s never easy is it?

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by starjack View Post
    One ??? who is going to be charged for the electricty to charge up these cars. With the power inferstucture being so bad.
    Thereís plenty of electricity currently being produced to provide charges for electric cars. Most major electric providers are already out in front of this thing. Besides, it doesnít take much juice to recharge a battery. It really shouldnít tax the current infrastructure unless an awful lot of people buy one. Those that are recharging batteries will be paying for it. There are even plans for charging stations on the street and in parking lots that work like parking meters. The electric utilities will make money on all those. It really shouldnít affect you if you donít own an electric car.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackstone View Post
    I donít have to defend Volt, and I donít speak on behalf of GM. All I did was address the inaccurate comments that were being made about it. The Volt will have a limited market, just like hybrid, because it doesnít fit everyoneís needs, but that doesnít mean itís going to be a failure.

    But, Buzz is right, electric vehicles are coming. All of the major auto manufacturers have invested a lot of money developing them. Volt just happened to be the first to market. Electric vehicles are the next major stop on the way to hydrogen powered vehicles.
    If they are such a success then why do we taxpayers have to pay $7,000.00 to GM for every one they sell?

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackstone View Post
    Franco,

    I know you have been waiting for a CNG pickup. That still might be a ways off. There is still a problem with CNG availability. I looked at getting a dedicate CNG van from MI to Kansas City. If I can get it to St. Louis, I can fill up there, and make it to KC. However, with a 300 mile range, it will be cutting it too close for comfort trying to get to St. Louis. The other problem is many of the stations are not readily open to the public. With some of them, you have to call ahead to make a reservation to get fuel. Unless companies are willing to make a significant investment in infrastructure, CNG is going to have a tough time gaining popularity. Traveling across country right now requires a lot of advanced planning, and fuel may not be available in a lot of places. In addition, currently the upfit for a CNG system is about $11k - $14k (at least on cargo vans). Now that the Fed tax credit has expired, thatís a hard pill to swallow. One more obstacle will be the number of tanks needed, and tank placement. If you want a 300 mile range with CNG, itís probably going to take 4 tanks, and at least one will probably have to be mounted in the bed of the truck, taking up usable space.

    The only viable option would be a bi-fuel system that would allow you to run on CNG and gasoline. There are some systems out there, but they are pretty expensive too. Then, there are the warranty issues caused by having a 3rd party install an aftermarket system. Itís never easy is it?
    Nothing worthwhile ever is.

    We have a CNG filling station going up at the corner of I-10 and I-49. With the abundence of natural gas, had we had a real energy policy over the last 20 years there would be CNG stations more readily avialble.

    I guess I'll just hold onto my 07 F150 as much as I would like to buy a new ride. I just can't motivate myself into buying another V-8 nor am I interested in diesel or a V6 or inline 4.

    My truck is for weekends so I can get anywhere I basically want to with only a 300 mile range with CNG. My weekday vehicle is a passenger car that gets almost 30 mpg's city and highway.
    "Well, when I went off to college, the guys I used to hang with were pumping gas and voting Democrat. Today they're still pumping gas and voting Democrat. Guess the Democrats didn't do much for them." Charles Barkley

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by caryalsobrook View Post
    If they are such a success then why do we taxpayers have to pay $7,000.00 to GM for every one they sell?
    If you actually read what I posted you would see I said the market will determine whether or not the Volt is a success. I never said it was, or was not, a success. The 2012 model year will be the first full year of production, and first year it will be sold in all 50 states. It's pretty hard to judge success or failure before the car is available for sale nation wide.

    As far as tax payers paying GM for every Volt they sell, I don't know anything about that, but it hardly sounds plausible. What is your source for that? If youíre talking about the Fed Income Tax Credit, it is a tax credit, not a payment. Tax credits for alternative fuel vehicles have been around since 2005. The tax credit is for all electric vehicles, not just Volt. Itís the same for the Ford Transit Connect EV, Nissan Leaf, Smart Car EV & Tesla Roadster. Prior to that, there were tax credits on hybrids, CNG & LPG vehicles.

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