The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Outdoor Media
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 30

Thread: Tips on squarin up on whistle sits???

  1. #1
    Senior Member troy schwab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Erie, PA
    Posts
    897

    Default Tips on squarin up on whistle sits???

    My dog is working through transition, and I have noticed, particularly at longer distances (60 + yds) his whistle sit is getting worse from square. He will sit immediately, sometimes adjusting himself to near square, but sometimes not so much. Generally sits facing the right, and turns to the right to stop most of the time, when on a line. Any tips on how to reinforce square sitting??? I can hit him with a come in whistle and he will square right up, but I dont want him to get reliant on that. Any help would be much appreciated......
    SHR Presque Isle Jaeger Schwab JH (driving the bus)

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Northern iowa
    Posts
    47

    Default

    I have had the same problem. I watched a training partner use the following. Handler bends down at the waist and stands back up. I trained my dog to follow the procedure by bending at the waste, here, knick sit. When back in the field used bend over at waste knick stand up. Know we are at bend over at the waist and the dog squares up.

    I look forward to seeing other methods. Good luck!!!

  3. #3
    Senior Member Chris Rosier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    285

    Default

    Start out with attrition, tweet him in a couple steps and sit him again, every time he gives you anything short of a perfect sit. Do this NOW, BEFORE it becomes an issue. I let mine get away with sloppy sits during the beginning of transition, I used too much collar pressure trying to fix it and as a result every time Id blow the whistle she'd turn around and lay down like she was taking on sniper fire. I had to put her with a pro for a couple of weeks to get it straightened out. He fixed it by having an assistant in the field with a heeling stick demanding a correct sit every time, a simple enough sounding solution, but obviously impossible to do by yourself.

    Good luck

    PS - I dont know if you're like me or not, I tried to rush through a lot of things in transition, wanting to get to "big dog work". Looking back, it was the most rewarding and fun time I had during her development. You have so many of those "lightbulb coming on" moments during transition, its really a fun time, enjoy it.
    HRCH Brady's BlackGold Benelli "Nelli"

    Blackgold's Lewd Lady "Kate"

  4. #4
    Senior Member Gun_Dog2002's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Mohawk Valley
    Posts
    8,671

    Default

    Another point of view. Why is it so critical that the dog sit square? Why make an issue out of it? If the dog takes the proper cast and holds the new line, and has to turn further to get it right, he will eventually sit straighter to reduce his own workload.

    /Paul
    Paul Cantrell
    Black Ice Retrievers
    Marcola OR

    Too many dogs to list (By some Bitch)

    https://www.facebook.com/BlackIceRetrievers
    http://gundog2002.blogspot.com/
    "Helping Hunters Train Their Dogs"

  5. #5
    Senior Member troy schwab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Erie, PA
    Posts
    897

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Rosier View Post
    Start out with attrition, tweet him in a couple steps and sit him again, every time he gives you anything short of a perfect sit. Do this NOW, BEFORE it becomes an issue. I let mine get away with sloppy sits during the beginning of transition, I used too much collar pressure trying to fix it and as a result every time Id blow the whistle she'd turn around and lay down like she was taking on sniper fire. I had to put her with a pro for a couple of weeks to get it straightened out. He fixed it by having an assistant in the field with a heeling stick demanding a correct sit every time, a simple enough sounding solution, but obviously impossible to do by yourself.

    Good luck

    PS - I dont know if you're like me or not, I tried to rush through a lot of things in transition, wanting to get to "big dog work". Looking back, it was the most rewarding and fun time I had during her development. You have so many of those "lightbulb coming on" moments during transition, its really a fun time, enjoy it.
    This is what I have been doing..... but Im not seeing much improvement..... I HAVE actually thought about walking out and whacking him with the stick if I can see his rump...... PITA.... but I have considered this..... We use it training horses and they pick it up real quick...... but it would suck and take too long, I believe, to be effective....... maybe not.
    SHR Presque Isle Jaeger Schwab JH (driving the bus)

  6. #6
    Senior Member troy schwab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Erie, PA
    Posts
    897

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gun_Dog2002 View Post
    Another point of view. Why is it so critical that the dog sit square? Why make an issue out of it? If the dog takes the proper cast and holds the new line, and has to turn further to get it right, he will eventually sit straighter to reduce his own workload.

    /Paul
    Ever tried to get a dog facing 90 degrees to the right to take a left back???? That sounds like a fight I really dont want to get into...... In reality though, he does most often take the correct cast, but maybe not on the best line had he been square.......
    SHR Presque Isle Jaeger Schwab JH (driving the bus)

  7. #7
    Member Jim Coggins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Wisconsin, Southeast
    Posts
    74

    Default

    This problem was just covered by Mike Lardy in this month's issue of The Retriever Journal. He had some good tips. Better to read the article than try and cover here. If you do not subscribe, I have found this in bookstores.
    Jim


    Quote Originally Posted by troy schwab View Post
    My dog is working through transition, and I have noticed, particularly at longer distances (60 + yds) his whistle sit is getting worse from square. He will sit immediately, sometimes adjusting himself to near square, but sometimes not so much. Generally sits facing the right, and turns to the right to stop most of the time, when on a line. Any tips on how to reinforce square sitting??? I can hit him with a come in whistle and he will square right up, but I dont want him to get reliant on that. Any help would be much appreciated......

  8. #8
    Senior Member troy schwab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Erie, PA
    Posts
    897

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Coggins View Post
    This problem was just covered by Mike Lardy in this month's issue of The Retriever Journal. He had some good tips. Better to read the article than try and cover here. If you do not subscribe, I have found this in bookstores.
    Jim
    THANKS FOR THE TIP! I will pick it up on the way home..... gander has it.
    SHR Presque Isle Jaeger Schwab JH (driving the bus)

  9. #9
    Senior Member Dustin D's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lake Charles, LA (Area)
    Posts
    2,082

    Default

    Oddly enough this is the second time this week I think this link below has become relevant to a topic on RTF>

    Here, Bill Hillmann walks Tammy Bell through getting her dog Maxx to 'Sit' properly.


    What started out as a 'Hold' concern led to a 'Sití lesson by Bill himself.

    I've read the entire thing more than once and have watched all the videos several times. A lot of good info in that thread for sure. It's in the favorites!

    http://www.findretrievers.com/forums...php?f=23&t=749





    /

  10. #10
    Senior Member Howard N's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    7,688

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by troy schwab View Post
    Ever tried to get a dog facing 90 degrees to the right to take a left back???? That sounds like a fight I really dont want to get into...... In reality though, he does most often take the correct cast, but maybe not on the best line had he been square.......
    I don't worry to much about a square sit in transition. I try to cast them left back if they're facing right if I can, but if the pile is a right back I give that. If it's really bad I'll toot toot to bring them back a little bit then toot again to stop them they should be straight then.

    In the long run they'll get as many right backs as left backs so their sit tends to face you as they get older.

    I found it interesting that you don't want to fight the dog on a miscast. This is transition! We're training them to take casts (amongst a lot of other things). If they spin right when facing right and I gave a left back, I stop them immediately, wait a moment, then cast again, since this is transition, I'll help the dog by giving a little sidestep or a hip swing to emphasize the side they're to turn on. We might fail several times, go to calling the dog back some 'cause she kept taking the wrong cast and got deep. Eventually, we'll get the right cast and I make damn sure the dog knows she done right.

    Also, how can you say he took the right cast but not as right as it would have been if he'd been sitting square? True, with these little dogs we have to give them leeway, but we're working towards a literal standard. If they know where the pile is then I require a literal cast. The leeway comes in when we're working on a cold blind.

    I've found unsquare sits to be a passing phase.
    Last edited by Howard N; 04-03-2012 at 03:37 PM.
    Howard Niemi

    You really gotta be careful about how high a pedestal you put your method, your accomplishments, your dog on. There's usually someone who's done more, somewhere. And they may have used a different method than you did! Chris Atkinson 2013

    get your dog out and TRAIN! caryalsobrook 2013

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •