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Thread: Male or Female Golden

  1. #11
    Senior Member T-Pines's Avatar
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    Calmer is not a male or female thing.
    If you want calmer, you need to pick the correct litter for that trait. Ask the questions about the parents of the breeding, again see if you can meet them. Then do all your research about the dogs in the pedigree. A knowlegeable breeder will know the dogs in the pedigree.

    Colleen

  2. #12
    Senior Member Gerry Clinchy's Avatar
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    About calmer ... if you are looking for a field work, even hunting, I think you should expect a puppy who is kind of "full of beans". Eager, bold, curious, energetic. Then you channel those traits with your training. If they are also intelligent, they should respond well to your training.
    G.Clinchy@gmail.com
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  3. #13
    Senior Member Jennifer Henion's Avatar
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    A note about independence and "sneaky-ness". Don't find it to be sex related. I think it's more dominance/submissive related within a litter. I have a 2.5 year old male Golden who is as independent and sneaky as all get out. He was the DOMINANT male of a litter of 3 pups. He is also the dominant male at my doggie daycare. He's not aggressive, just makes sure everyone knows he's the king of the universe. He is young, but was born an old soul who clearly takes life seriously and knows what he wants. This was very apparent at 7.5 weeks of age.

    In contrast, I now have an 11 week old female Golden pup who was of a litter of nine females!! Luckily, the breeder I chose knows her stuff and could help me choose a middle of the road personality as I requested. I wanted a pup that wanted to work with me, but wasn't going to melt or make her own decisions. I had the opportunity to pick from 6 of the 9 female pups and could see that some were very independent and some on the demure side, whereas there were a couple right in the middle - bold, confident, but loved to make eye contact and walk with us wherever we walked.

    She has been with us for 3.5 weeks now and I feel like we totally scored! But it wasn't all luck- we chose a fantastic pedigree and breeder. And we asked successful Golden people what to look for in a pup. A well bred field pup who is smart and takes a moment to observe what it's humans and other pack members are doing, will learn to settle down in the house. We started clicker training this pup at 7.5 weeks, just to spark the brain into training mode and she is a great member of the household, always looking to learn or offer the right behavior.

    Good luck and if you don't already have a preference for girl or boy, go with a well bred litter and pick the level of dominance or submission that you want in a house member. The rest is moot. But what an exciting journey!!

    Jennifer

  4. #14
    Senior Member jackh's Avatar
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    I will be meeting the female within the next two weeks. They owners kept a male from their last litter with he same parents, so I will be able to meet him also. I plan to talk to them about what I am looking for in a dog and see what they advise.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Cowtown's Avatar
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    Jack,

    If you don't mind sharing...what breeding are you looking at?

  6. #16
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    I train with people that have males and people that have females. It is clear that there are significant differences between males and females. Females come into season one or two times a year preventing you from running them in trials. Males, on the other hand, have a definite need to mark everything, including holding blinds, other peoples tires, etc. As for any other generalizations about the differences between sexes, I think that they are mostly a figment of peoples imaginations.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Brian Urban's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Johnson View Post
    As for any other generalizations about the differences between sexes, I think that they are mostly a figment of peoples imaginations.
    Agreed. Nothing to it at all...

    Last edited by Brian Urban; 04-26-2012 at 06:17 PM.

  8. #18
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    I forgot to mention that males sometimes have a problem distinguishing between a female dog and someone's leg. Females, on the other hand, provide a male dog handlers a convient excuse for why a their dog failed the first series.

    In all seriousness, 40% of the qualifiers for the National Amateur are female while 60% are male. Since females cannot be run from 6 - 12% of the time (depending on whether they come into heat 1 or 2 times per year) their sucess while running is more or less equal to the males.

  9. #19
    Senior Member jackh's Avatar
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    Are intact males more prone to dominance issues or is that a factor of breeding/training as well? My friend has a intact male black lab that is a fire breathing SOB. He is very intelligent and knows who is who and what he can get away with when he is around different people. It is like he looks at you, sizes you up, and then pushes your limits with everyone he meets. It is almost like you have to prove you are the alpha male daily with him or he will not mind at all. I will admit, he is definitely what I would call a handler's dog, but he is owned by someone more fit for a companion dog. He does not get worked enough imo. His owner doesn't want to get him fixed, but I feel like that might help the situation.
    Last edited by jackh; 04-29-2012 at 05:53 PM.

  10. #20
    Senior Member Sue Kiefer's Avatar
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    He may be a fire breather but the owner usually is at fault for
    A. Not knowing what type of dog he/she CAN handle
    B. allowing nasty stupid behavior to continue.
    This is also true for the person that allows their male dog to be a pig.
    My boys don't pee all over anything and won't think of humping in- appropriate objects.
    Sue
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