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Thread: What's with the FF voodoo???

  1. #1
    Senior Member arklahunter's Avatar
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    Default What's with the FF voodoo???

    I saw my 8month old CLF for the first time after being with the trainer for 6 weeks. I noticed a lot of difference in her already. She following all of the commands, but pretty loose. The trainer said that it was partly because she new I was there and distracted, but she also said after FF she will tighten up a lot.

    My question is what is it about FF that would cause that. Also, is that a common result of FF?

    This is my first pup so I'm just curious...

  2. #2
    Member Pigpen's Avatar
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    In the words of the trainer that helped me with my first one, "it gives them a job." It just puts some structure in their life.
    We don't rent pigs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pigpen View Post
    In the words of the trainer that helped me with my first one, "it gives them a job." It just puts some structure in their life.
    Very succinct. I would add it reinforces who is in control, who the leader is and there is no escaping a command. There is so much going on in terms of who owns the dowel, buck or duck. In the force you are really getting inside the dogs head so a good trainer will clearly be teaching, reinforcing and habituating a dog to the desired behavior hopefully at a high standard.
    It is incumbent of the author of the original post to have a solid grasp of the principles and practise of handling and training these fine retrievers less you fall into the category of a person capable only taking a dog for a walk.

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    Senior Member arklahunter's Avatar
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    This is why I posed the question. As I mentioned this is my first pup... The trainer has made it clear to me that part of her training program is a lengthy set of classes for me me to learn how to handle and work the dog.

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    Your job is to stay ahead of the dog and the trainer. Read the books by the top trainers, watch the DVDs from the Lardy, Farmer, Rorem, Hillmann and a cadre of others. When the pro is finished with your dog you will have a dog with a solid foundation. While all this training is going you can have meaningful conversations with the pro because you are current and knowledgeable of the literature. Two things will happen for sure; you will respect the talent and work the pro is putting into your young dog and the pro will see you have a passion for good dog work and will bring you along as well. Anything less then be content to walk a dog.
    Last edited by Ironwood; 05-19-2012 at 12:09 AM. Reason: spelling error

  6. #6
    Senior Member Brian Urban's Avatar
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    FF takes the happy puppy bursting with life energy who is filled with joy, love of retrieving and is motivated to do anything just to please you because it wants to and results in a dog who knows that it must please you or there will be consequences.

    After FF, it will still be happy. But the messin' around when there is work to be done part will be brought to a stop.

    Think of it as the difference between school and your first day on the job. In school, you decided what you wanted to do in life and attended all those class and worked hard to get good grades. But you had the flexibility to enjoy things and to work at your own pace on your terms. If you really didn't want to study or attend classes, you could blow it (them) off. Once you started your career, you had a boss that demanded that you work by the rules, work his hours and work by standards set by him. You get focused in a hurry or you won't get paid.

    You showed up and said "hi" when the critter was still in school. She knew she could get away with waving at you from her desk and distracting her class. Once she starts her job (FF), she'll love to to see you but won't be able to hang out during business hours. Then, you'll be her boss and set the workin' time and vacation time.
    Last edited by Brian Urban; 05-19-2012 at 06:00 AM.

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    thanks for posting this arklahunter, I am about 3 or so weeks away from beginning hold and then ff with my first pup as well. I know what I have to do as i'm following a program closely but he just doesn't spend much time explaining other than demonstrating his drills. i'm curious to know also what to expect post ff.

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    Senior Member arklahunter's Avatar
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    Brian Urban... I have to say that your response is probably the most easy to understand reply to a question I have seen on this site so far... Thanks for taking the time to post it.

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    Senior Member jd6400's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ironwood View Post
    Your job is to stay ahead of the dog and the trainer. Read the books by the top trainers, watch the DVDs from the Lardy, Farmer, Rorem, Hillmann and a cadre of others. When the pro is finished with your dog you will have a dog with a solid foundation. While all this training is going you can have meaningful conversations with the pro because you are current and knowledgeable of the literature. Two things will happen for sure; you will respect the talent and work the pro is putting into your young dog and the pro will see you have a passion for good dog work and will bring you along as well. Anything less then be content to walk a dog.
    Good point!I`m guessing 1 out of 10 will actually do that and stay up with the work once they go home.Hell,just come out and train with the pro one day a week is asking alot out of most.

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    Good points all.

    I have my first dog, and I sent him to a trainer for FF. I found when he came back that I needed to give him opportunities for corrections so I could get in some ear pinches. He needed to know that I, not the wonderful pro who FFd him, was now his employer. Now, on the rare day he starts messing around, a reach for that left ear is usually all it takes to remind him of our employer-employee relationship.

    It absolutely changes the relationship between you and your dog.

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