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Thread: Differences between Attrition and 3-peats?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobinZClark View Post
    Thank you all so much! This clarifies much for me. Just the idea of the 3-peat being three repetitions of the same **concept** but not the same exact sequence is huge to me. I am just getting started reading my Retriever Online (I just ordered 2007-2009) and there are so many great, new ideas in there that I am a bit excited about the whole affair. Am sure I will have many other general questions.
    Thanks for asking the question, the great responses that your question got helped me. I learn something every time I get on this site
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  2. #12
    Senior Member RobinZClark's Avatar
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    In other dog training venues (agility and obedience) some trainers use attrition, but they don't really have a name for it and they don't describe it well. It is a wonderful and powerful teaching tool. I heard the term from Bridget Carlsen in reference to teaching obedience...I am sure that she learned it thru field work.

    Can someone speak to the idea of 3-peats and how the 3 different repetitions vary? Would you start out easier and gradually make things more difficult? How do you vary the concept? I agree that there is much more to this topic.
    Last edited by RobinZClark; 07-18-2012 at 07:06 PM.

  3. #13
    Senior Member RetrieversONLINE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobinZClark View Post
    In other dog training venues (agility and obedience) some trainers use attrition, but they don't really have a name for it and they don't describe it well. It is a wonderful and powerful teaching tool. I heard the term from Bridget Carlsen in reference to teaching obedience...I am sure that she learned it thru field work.

    Can someone speak to the idea of 3-peats and how the 3 different repetitions vary? Would you start out easier and gradually make things more difficult? How do you vary the concept? I agree that there is much more to this topic.
    Robin

    Since I am the one who coined the term "3-peats" and you just received 18 back issues of my Retrievers ONLINE, I think you will find many examples of 3-peats as you read them!!! Three-peats are extremely powerful and they are valuable for dogs from Basics to Advanced. Captainjack's definition will be a good starter for you! Note that sometimes we refer to n-peats meaning it can be a 2-peat, a 3-peat, a 4-peat, a 5-peat etc. Many tune-up drills are 5-7- peats!

    As you have learned attrition is a totally different concept referring to a way of repeating an instruction(without overt pressure) to get a dog to understand what you are asking by simply repeating the instruction. It is a safe and first choice option but beware of it not having a significant effect on future behaviour.

    Cheers
    Dennis

  4. #14
    Senior Member RobinZClark's Avatar
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    Thanks so much Dennis. I have to tell you, I am reading my 3rd issue and I LOVE IT. I am getting so many great ideas to apply to my obedience training. You have opened up some new worlds for me. I am constantly thinking now about how to structure my training for "teaching" instead of mindless repetition. It is fun for to to translate the retrieving concepts to the venue of competition obedience. And who knows, when I get my new golden puppy maybe I'll give the field game a try!

    You are a great fellow for documenting general principles in your publication. I am reading and digesting as quick as I can.

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