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Thread: Any training places where I don't have to leave my puppy? (14wks old)

  1. #41
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    I think you are way overthinking and overcomplicating this whole process.

    1) it's a dog
    2) the dog doesn't know what you don't know.
    3) 1 reason labs and goldens are used/ bred for this is because of their forgiving nature, for the most part.
    4) If you make a mistake while training the dog will forgive you and move forward
    5) Training a dog to be a usefull hunter is not as hard as you are making it out to be. they may not win a competition but they will hunt and you will enjoy hunting with them.
    6) spend a few bucks, buy a few books and videos. Pick one that you like. Start training.
    7) you dont need $10k worth of equipment, some bumpers, heel stick, leads and chains. You dont need launchers - people can throw bumpers, that why we have arms.
    Last edited by gdluck; 09-10-2012 at 05:15 PM.

  2. #42
    Senior Member Howard N's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gdluck View Post
    I think you are way overthinking and overcomplicating this whole process.

    1) it's a dog
    2) the dog doesn't know what you don't know.
    3) 1 reason labs and goldens are used/ bred for this is because of their forgiving nature, for the most part.
    4) If you make a mistake while training the dog will forgive you and move forward
    5) Training a dog to be a usefull hunter is not as hard as you are making it out to be. they may not win a competition but they will hunt and you will enjoy hunting with them.
    6) spend a few bucks, buy a few books and videos. Pick one that you like. Start training.
    7) you dont need $10k worth of equipment, some bumpers, heel stick, leads and chains. You dont need launchers - people can throw bumpers, that why we have arms.
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  3. #43
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gdluck View Post
    I think you are way overthinking and overcomplicating this whole process.

    1) it's a dog - Indeed
    2) the dog doesn't know what you don't know. - but the dog will learn what you don't know, sometimes the hard way
    3) 1 reason labs and goldens are used/ bred for this is because of their forgiving nature, for the most part. Is that why we use them?
    4) If you make a mistake while training the dog will forgive you and move forward - unless you keep repeating the mistake
    5) Training a dog to be a usefull hunter is not as hard as you are making it out to be. they may not win a competition but they will hunt and you will enjoy hunting with them. - will you? Seems many don't, at least I hear them across the marsh yelling a lot like they don't.
    6) spend a few bucks, buy a few books and videos. Pick one that you like. Start training. - Reading Golf digest never made a better gofer but getting lessons did.
    7) you dont need $10k worth of equipment, some bumpers, heel stick, leads and chains. You dont need launchers - people can throw bumpers, that why we have arms.
    - 10K does sound high. Add gasoline and birds and you get close.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

  4. #44
    Senior Member Mark Littlejohn's Avatar
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    Sent you a pm with my number.. Call me if you'd like to talk dogs and training.
    How far can you throw a duck?

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  5. #45
    Senior Member Breck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdzlaw View Post
    Perhaps a stupid question...but how do boarding/training trainers work? (I know there are many different methods, but I am just looking for an average)
    i.e. How many pups do they have at a time? Where are the pups kept (indoor/outdoors)? Do they train the dogs at set times? How much actual hands-on training is done on an average day? Would training dogs be kept with other dogs (if so, I'm guessing the dogs would have to be spayed/neutered prior to going off for training)? And if around other dogs, are they always supervised (to avoid overly-aggressive dogs, etc.) Or...Is a training dog kept isolated? Would a training dog be around other people (non-trainers/trainer's family/trainer's friends, etc.). Is a training dog taken away from the trainer's home for any reason? Most reputable trainers don't have a non-training "day job" or any other obligations, or do they? How is a training dog's day spent? (how many hours in a kennel, how many hours training, how many hours playing, how many hours just laying around)
    What ages do most people send their dogs away? How long on average is a dog sent away for?
    I've read that some trainers advocate shock collars, others don't...some use choke collars, some don't...some swear by force fetch, some don't.... -do trainers generally train according to what works for them or do they go down certain paths (i.e. shock collars, etc.) ONLY if it is necessary for the particular dog (I notice in videos/books - trainers seem to take one position or another). It can be controversial things or something seemingly minor: I recently came across a trainer that refuses to use orange bumpers and will only use white canvas ones (both because of color and material).
    I can go on and on with questions but I fear it may be overload to read.
    Look here’s the deal.
    Generally speaking:
    Trainers who use E-collars and Pinch collars are desirable in today's retriever training world. Don’t send your dog do anyone who says he only uses cloth dummies and doesn't use an e-collar. Unless you intend to send your dog to England. Take advice from old timers here on RTF vs what you think you know. Trainers with a depth of field trial or hunt test accomplishments are more desirable than those without. Many good ones near Houston. Choose those recommend here on RTF vs others you might hear about.

    To your 50 questions……..

    Dogs enter formal training with a professional at 6 months of age more or less depending on maturity.
    Owners are expected to prepare their puppy by doing the proper training from 8 weeks to 6 months. At times a trainer may take a baby puppy to raise for a client in his home until it’s ready for formal training.
    Most people who send their young dog off to private school leave them there for the duration, don’t mess with them, don’t bring them home for the weekend or dumb stuff like that. The do however participate in their dogs training at the appropriate times. Very few dogs in training are ever spayed or neutered. It ain't doggie daycare.
    A professional working on his own without an assistant may have 12 to 20 dogs in training.
    A professional who has a capable young dog assistant may have twice as many dogs.
    Dogs live in a typical professional boarding kennel environment when they are not training. Facilities differ by trainer and part of the country.
    Dogs get feed, aired, loaded on dog truck at dawn each morning for the days training. They’ll have water throughout the day. At the end of the day dogs get fed, aired around sunset and are kenneled for the night. If on the road away from home dogs spend the night in their hole on the truck. Many trainers train 6 days a week but work 7.
    It takes about a year of training to get a dog through what is typically called the Transition stage, advanced work follows and continues for the dog’s life. Essentially daily training never stops until the dog is retired.
    Dogs are exposed to people who work for the pro and the clients who come out to train with him, that’s it unless they go to an event. No one other than the pro or his assistant mess with the dogs. Sometimes a client may be asked to handle some of the other dogs in training to gain experience.
    Dogs are always supervised when not on truck or in kennel. Typically a group of dogs are aired together and trainer may have dogs separated into several groups to minimize males exposure to bitches and to separate dogs who may get into each other.
    Each training day is different but typically 2, 3 even 4 “setups” may be done each day with each dog getting his turn on each setup then goes back on the truck and trainer grabs another dog rinse and repeat. If trainer has mix of young and old dogs he may work puppies first on yard work or drills and other stuff then head out for the day with the big dogs. Typically pros have numerous properties they borrow to train on other than their own home grounds and may drive a good distance to get to them on occasion. Many pros travel to avoid the heat of summer and cold of winter. Pros in Texas move to states near the Canadian border during the summer and pros from the north come to Texas in the winter. Your dog would travel as well. Basically a competent pro will give the dogs more work than you could imagine possible right now. They’ll see plenty of work, eat and sleep good.
    Look at sending your dog to a professional like sending your kid to a boarding prep school.
    Last edited by Breck; 09-10-2012 at 09:25 PM.
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  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Littlejohn View Post
    Sent you a pm with my number.. Call me if you'd like to talk dogs and training.
    How far can you throw a duck?

    Mark
    I wouldn't ask her, make her think its her idea first...LOL TEASING!!!
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  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne Nutt View Post
    Sounds like you are determined to proceed on your own plan. So here is some advice:
    Dogs need to be trained a minimun of four days per week but preferrably six days with one mental health day off.
    You should be following a training program. The three most often talked about are:
    1. Total Retriever Training by Mike Lardy (a high percentage of pros use this method)
    2. Smartworks by Evan Graham (a lot of first timers like this program)
    3. Fowldogs by Rick Stawski
    You will need lots of equipment (est. $6-10,000 min.)
    1. Winger zingers with electronics
    2. Bumperboy launchers
    3. Ecollar
    4. Holding blinds
    5. Leads
    6. Choke chains
    7. Healing sticks
    8. Stickmen
    9. Lots of bumpers (two dozen with both orange and white)
    9. Misc other things like an atv but not a must with one dog, boat, whistles.
    10. Freezer space for birds (ducks, pigeons, pheasant, etc)
    11. Pen for live pigeons
    You will need access to large acreage with water for training. Parks won't do.

    Yes the trainer will have these things but you will need to do the things you are taught on your own.

    Most amateurs fall down because of the lack of training grounds, birds and a lack of understanding of the total training system. Thus the need for a training program to study and follow. Another major factor is time. I don't know if you have a job or not but if so, time will be at a premium.
    Edit: Your are not looking at 15-20 min. per day but several hours per day. The training time per dog is probably only 30 minutes but you have to add the travel time, set up time, take down time, maintenance of equipment time, etc.
    For mulitple dogs this decreases per dog but for one dog the time is as stated. Dog training is time intensive.

    You will have to be able to go train with the trainer in the morning.

    Good luck in your endeavors.


    Wayne, with all do respect. That is a chunk of change, unnecessary for the op-s goals.

    Here is what you need--- for a first timer.

    First, and foremost a place to train. Public, private or otherwise. By far the most important component.

    Bumpers (150. 00) I like Neuman and bennett's--- they have seconds. http://www.decoy1.com/
    choke chain (15.00)
    Rope. ( ken will donate)
    starter gun( 50.00)
    birds (free for me from my dairy friends) but usually can find em for two bucks a piece.
    Training videos, books---(300. 00? )
    Bumper launchers are cool ( I have a couple at about 150 for both) Cabella's
    Other misc stuff: (200.00)?

    Most of us here love training, and it does not need to cost a fortune.

    You have been given great advice! I would always want to train my own dog. I enjoy training dogs, have the time , property, and a little bit of know how.


    I certainly understand the pro's perspective. And, we are fortunate to have them here. Wayne is no doubt a much, much better trainer than me--he has many more resources and much more knowledge. For most, that is money well spent.

    Good luck to you, John
    Last edited by 7pntail; 09-10-2012 at 10:51 PM.
    John Stroh, Lodi ca


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  8. #48
    Senior Member Rnd's Avatar
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    To the OP. You have received several good answers to your many questions ....

    Take the advice and do what you will with it..

    Randy
    May you pin all the marks and line the blinds!!

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  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne Nutt View Post
    Sounds like you are determined to proceed on your own plan. So here is some advice:
    Dogs need to be trained a minimun of four days per week but preferrably six days with one mental health day off.
    You should be following a training program. The three most often talked about are:
    1. Total Retriever Training by Mike Lardy (a high percentage of pros use this method)
    2. Smartworks by Evan Graham (a lot of first timers like this program)
    3. Fowldogs by Rick Stawski
    You will need lots of equipment (est. $6-10,000 min.)
    1. Winger zingers with electronics
    2. Bumperboy launchers
    3. Ecollar
    4. Holding blinds
    5. Leads
    6. Choke chains
    7. Healing sticks
    8. Stickmen
    9. Lots of bumpers (two dozen with both orange and white)
    9. Misc other things like an atv but not a must with one dog, boat, whistles.
    10. Freezer space for birds (ducks, pigeons, pheasant, etc)
    11. Pen for live pigeons
    You will need access to large acreage with water for training. Parks won't do.

    Yes the trainer will have these things but you will need to do the things you are taught on your own.

    Most amateurs fall down because of the lack of training grounds, birds and a lack of understanding of the total training system. Thus the need for a training program to study and follow. Another major factor is time. I don't know if you have a job or not but if so, time will be at a premium.
    Edit: Your are not looking at 15-20 min. per day but several hours per day. The training time per dog is probably only 30 minutes but you have to add the travel time, set up time, take down time, maintenance of equipment time, etc.
    For mulitple dogs this decreases per dog but for one dog the time is as stated. Dog training is time intensive.

    You will have to be able to go train with the trainer in the morning.

    Good luck in your endeavors.
    Well said Wayne!!! Ditto to what he said....I don't even want to add up what I have invested. And that's what it is, especially if you plan on being serious about it. Good luck!

    Edit: I train my dog for hunt tests and field trials so I have invested more because this is my passion. However, if you have a couple kids of your own or a couple neighborhood kids who will throw birds for you for a few hours a day for $20, you don't need all the fancy equipment (that's how I got my start when I was 11.). You should, however, be willing and ready/aware that you will need to spend some money to buy the basic things you will HAVE TO HAVE to train your dog for whatever purpose you intend (hunting or competition or both.) Be careful though, when you really start training and can see what your dog is capable of, you may end up wanting to compete or play some "game" with her. CAUTION: THIS IS ADDICTIVE!!!! Best drug I know of anyway! Good luck!

    Jamee
    Last edited by Jamee Strange; 09-11-2012 at 12:30 AM.
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