The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Outdoor Media
Page 5 of 10 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 98

Thread: Chicago teachers on strike

  1. #41
    Senior Member menmon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,275

    Default

    Historically WI or the more social states produce well educated people, but now you want to make them like texas and produce a bunch of dumb a>>es. Just look at how clueless our governer is and then do the math. Cutting spending on teachers will bite you in the a>>...just look at Texas's model and you won't have any problem connecting the dots.

  2. #42
    Senior Member huntinman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    7,078

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by menmon View Post
    Historically WI or the more social states produce well educated people, but now you want to make them like texas and produce a bunch of dumb a>>es. Just look at how clueless our governer is and then do the math. Cutting spending on teachers will bite you in the a>>...just look at Texas's model and you won't have any problem connecting the dots.
    Umm...don't you live and work in Texas?
    Bill Davis

  3. #43
    Senior Member menmon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,275

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by huntinman View Post
    Umm...don't you live and work in Texas?
    yea but I went to school in Chicago....the country wants to be like texas now....lot of great things here but education except for higher education sucks....just pull up standardized test scores and you know all you need to know.

  4. #44
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    134

    Default

    I believe more studies have shown that class size does matter. It may not be the only important factor, but it still is a factor. Comparing college level lecture classes to public school classes is apples to oranges. 50 or more 18 year olds and over that are paying to be there is quite different than 30 +- public school students. Quality of the teacher is important, but classroom teachers in public schools hands are being tied (figuratively) more and more.
    Mike


    Quote Originally Posted by Gerry Clinchy View Post
    Studies have shown that class size are not truly relevant to learning results. The quality of the teacher and the attention of the students is more a factor. In good colleges, "lecture-type" classes for many subjects have long been common. But no hooliganism is tolerated in those environments.

    A teacher can keep their cool in a room of 50 kids, if the kids abide by rules that preserve a learning environment. 30 well-behaved students are not a problem. 15 hooligans are a problem; 30 hooligans is anarchy.

  5. #45
    Senior Member Gerry Clinchy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    6,925

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mjiorle View Post
    I believe more studies have shown that class size does matter. It may not be the only important factor, but it still is a factor. Comparing college level lecture classes to public school classes is apples to oranges. 50 or more 18 year olds and over that are paying to be there is quite different than 30 +- public school students. Quality of the teacher is important, but classroom teachers in public schools hands are being tied (figuratively) more and more.
    Mike
    This then goes back to the root of the problem I started with ... the students are not required to abide by rules that prevent them from interfering with the teaching/learning process.

    Albeit long ago! I went to public schools with classes close to, if not equal to, 30 students. Misbehavior was not tolerated. We got to release energy during recess.

    As for the "paying to be there" part ... those students' in public schools have parents who are paying for them to be there as well. It is just not as obvious as it is with paying tuition. Every time I pay my property taxes, it is a very clear reminder

    While a goodly portion of public school students have parents who may not be paying taxes, those who are paying the bills should care that the schools are using that hard-earned $ to best advantage.

    In regard to Menmon's mention of special attention to students with special needs ... there is a LOT of that available to children with special needs in today's school systems. My DIL is such a teacher, a reading specialist.
    G.Clinchy@gmail.com
    "Know in your heart that all things are possible. We couldn't conceive of a miracle if none ever happened." -Libby Fudim

    ​I don't use the PM feature, so just email me direct at the address shown above.

  6. #46
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    134

    Default

    Tuition is optional, taxes are not. Why do private schools have better scores and fewer behavior problems, sometimes with lesser facilities and course offerings? Simple, it's a different class of people that are paying to send their children there. You are right that students(not enough of them), are not required to abide by the rules, and that is a direct reflection of society and parental influences.
    Mike

  7. #47
    Senior Member Jason Glavich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    woodbridge,VA
    Posts
    1,943

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerry Clinchy View Post
    I had the same reaction ... she could make a career of stand-up. Did she actually criticize Obama's choice of Sec of Educ?
    She also criticized a Harvard degree saying it wasn't hard to stay there just to get in and accused him of self medicating while at Harvard, then says she used to smoke pot in Dartmouth all the time and she self medicated. That woman is a poor excuse for a teacher.
    My Father,My Friend,My teacher,and now My Angel~ 04/21/1956-03/21/2011 You will always be missed. I hope to learn half of the stuff you knew.

    ~Blessed are those who mourn for they shall be comforted~

  8. #48
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Pac NW
    Posts
    4,269

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mjiorle View Post
    I believe more studies have shown that class size does matter. It may not be the only important factor, but it still is a factor. Comparing college level lecture classes to public school classes is apples to oranges. 50 or more 18 year olds and over that are paying to be there is quite different than 30 +- public school students. Quality of the teacher is important, but classroom teachers in public schools hands are being tied (figuratively) more and more.
    Mike
    Each year in negotiations this subject was broached by the reps fron the teachers association - we asked them for any substantiation they could provide - every year there was none, so it was dropped - IMO lower class sizes means more union members & little else - having a lot of experience as a participant in the class room, teacher quality & a stimulating subject are the biggest reason children learn - a good teacher is a good stimulator

    I started at a liberal arts school - left after one semester as there was little challenge - went to an engineering school, now that was college level & the courses were stimulating - I believe some HS level courses could meet that same criteria -
    __________________________

    Marvin S

    Everyone's friend is No One's friend

    Someday your life will flash before your eyes. It's your responsibility to make sure it's worth watching!

  9. #49
    Senior Member twall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,123

    Default

    Home school!

    Tom
    Tom Wall

  10. #50
    Senior Member menmon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,275

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerry Clinchy View Post
    This then goes back to the root of the problem I started with ... the students are not required to abide by rules that prevent them from interfering with the teaching/learning process.

    Albeit long ago! I went to public schools with classes close to, if not equal to, 30 students. Misbehavior was not tolerated. We got to release energy during recess.

    As for the "paying to be there" part ... those students' in public schools have parents who are paying for them to be there as well. It is just not as obvious as it is with paying tuition. Every time I pay my property taxes, it is a very clear reminder

    While a goodly portion of public school students have parents who may not be paying taxes, those who are paying the bills should care that the schools are using that hard-earned $ to best advantage.

    In regard to Menmon's mention of special attention to students with special needs ... there is a LOT of that available to children with special needs in today's school systems. My DIL is such a teacher, a reading specialist.
    That's it...the parents are paying either through taxes or rent that ultimately pays the taxes...not the students so it does not mean anything.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •