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Thread: Carrying lines on blinds

  1. #41
    Administrator Chris Atkinson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pals View Post
    That is it!! Thank you so much. I could not remember the distances between the back piles and I couldn't find it in my notes. Thanks for taking the time to look it up.
    Wow. This is the very drill that I called Howard to discuss within the last couple weeks. I am glad I got to talk live with him one last time. I did so because Bill was mentioning the drill and I wanted to talk through it live.

    The timing is interesting. I was talking with a Field Trialer the other day who was just telling me how his/her household tries to always say "goodbye" with a smile, a hug, etc., parting ways on a happy note. The reason was that you never know what will happen after you say "goodbye".

    I'm on day two of trying to wrap my mind around Howard being gone. Life is precious. Life is brief. Howard, I hope to see you in Heaven one day.

    Chris
    "Determining and applying the criteria for when and when not to use correction is the essence of the art of dog training. I make a distinction between a mistake and a lack of effort." - Mike Lardy - Volume I "After Collar Conditioning"

  2. #42
    Senior Member Nik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howard N View Post
    This is a drill I do from the time the pup is in transition 'til I retire the dog. I'll do it 3-4 times a week with the transition dog until they are smooth on it at this first field. Then I'll take it to another field and do it again. It'll take ~2 weeks in the first field to become smooth. Then maybe a week in another field to become smooth. With my big dogs I might only do it once a week and miss a week now and then but I do do it all their competitive lives.

    First I'll send to each pile from my side usually an over then the angle to the same side then the other over and then the angle to that side and finally the back pile. 5 total sends from my side. I'll then leave the dog on the line and walk ~ 10 yards away from them and cast to each pile. With youngsters I do it in order over, angle, then straight back all to either the left or the right. Then I'll do the same to the other side. Once they've been smooth on this drill for a few weeks at different fields I'll start mixing up the casts, that is left over followed by a right back etc. I don't burn, get mad, or show temper on this drill It's hard and all those piles and old blinds are distractions to the dog. I will not let them take a wrong cast but stop them as soon as I see them taking the wrong cast. I then repeat the cast. If I get a 2nd missed cast I'll move the dog up towards the pile simplifying it. I do not pound and pound on this drill in one day expecting them to get it right the first day. I only line each pile once and cast to each pile once except the back pile which gets a right and a left straight back. Altogether I only put out 11 bumpers per each time I do it. I figure I do it enough the casts will come in time and they always have.

    I learned this drill at Jim Gonia's McKenna kennel when I had a youngster there. I brought her home for the summer and Jim or his assistant told me to keep this drill going during the summer. I set it up twice a week for the pup and since I was setting it up anyway also did my older dog, my first retriever, too. My first dog wouldn't hold a cast worth a darn. After a couple of weeks of doing this drill I realized that what used to be 7 or 8 whistle blinds with him were now becoming 3 and 4 whistle blinds. He was taking better casts and holding them longer.

    You have to keep a high standard of casting in the field. You give an angle insist on it. You give an over do not accept an angle or an over and then a scallop. I do literal casting and insist the dog take the literal cast in training.



    I learned a very similar drill from a friend. He would start with 5 white bumpers-arranged in a semi-circle about 3 yards from the center-basically a left & right over bumper angle back left and right, and straight back. He kept the bumpers tight to encourage quick, precise turning. He would run the dog from his side starting at the left over, and work his way around the semi-circle-and the back. He'd then step away and leave the dog in the middle and cast left over, left angle back, left over. Once the dog got all 3 cast correctly he would move on. Next left angle back, left back, left angle back. Right back, right angle back, right back. Right angle back, right over, right angle back. Then repeat the drill moving around rage arc the opposite direction. The key is not to move on until you get 3 correct casts in a row.
    Last edited by Nik; 11-05-2013 at 08:28 AM.
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  3. #43
    Senior Member Nik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pals View Post
    I would like some suggestions on how to improve my dogs ability to carry lines on blinds at field trial distances. For example: I give a right angle back, the dog turns properly, moves in the right direction but does not dig in and carry that line, causing another whistle and a choppy looking blind.

    Thanks
    It sounds to me like your dog is not holding lines against factors. I personally don't think that casting drills alone are going to fix that. I would spend time running lining drills similar to what Lardy calls tune up drills. There are ways to simplify these drills to improve a dogs ability to handle running against factors.
    Tequila Smells Like Jail

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  4. #44
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    so are these piles identified first? cold? white bumpers? orange bumpers? buckets? i have seen a version of this drill before but they used white buckets at the pile to help the dog understand the cast. i myself didnt use the "bucket" routine when teaching blinds but i know some do

  5. #45
    Senior Member Jennifer Henion's Avatar
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    Chris, would you be willing to share the gist of your conversation with Howard about the drill?

  6. #46
    Administrator Chris Atkinson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer Henion View Post
    Chris, would you be willing to share the gist of your conversation with Howard about the drill?
    Your post #39 does a good job of summarizing the drill portion of the discussion.

    Howard was always a friendly man and shared some great knowledge with me over the years.
    "Determining and applying the criteria for when and when not to use correction is the essence of the art of dog training. I make a distinction between a mistake and a lack of effort." - Mike Lardy - Volume I "After Collar Conditioning"

  7. #47
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    Here's one which Howard went out of his way to Google, draw up and share- Made for Linda W- and shared w me because it's my backyard and wanted to ask questions about how the terrain really was on ground level.


  8. #48
    Senior Member MooseGooser's Avatar
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    In Cherylon Lovelands book. She does basically what Howard drew, and what Miss Pals wanted. Loveland calls it the HANDLING Wagon wheel. (Not lining Wagon Wheel)

    In her book,, it shows the order in which you throw each bumper, very important.

    It teaches angle backs, straight backs, overs, angle ins, straight ins.

    She does this drill at the end of the TT.

    At first the drill is relativly close, but it seems as though you can increase distances as Howard described as the dog progresses.
    It is far easier to spit on the work of others than it is to produce something better yourself.
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  9. #49
    Senior Member Pals's Avatar
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    Thank you. I am ready to start my young dog on Howards drill. Thanks for the additional drills and suggestions.

  10. #50
    Senior Member weathered's Avatar
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    I cannot see the original drawing of the drill Howard posted. Is it just me or is the pic gone? It's something I could certainly use.

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