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Thread: Handle at a Hunt test

  1. #1
    Senior Member John Lash's Avatar
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    Default Handle at a Hunt test

    I know nothing about hunt tests except what I've read on RTF. Is it correct that in a marking test you are allowed to handle and still get called back?

    If you can, is it a common thing or rarely done?
    Last edited by John Lash; 10-31-2012 at 05:01 PM.
    John Lash

    "If you run Field Trials, you learn to swallow your disappointment quickly."

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    Senior Member John Robinson's Avatar
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    It is fairly common, but it has been my experience that it should be a clean handle and the dog needs to show that he at least marked the bird well enough to be near the area of the fall. I handle it just as if I were hunting, I don't want my dog hunting all over the place if I can see he's close to the bird but not coming up with it I handle.

    John

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    Yes,,, Not all handles are created equal. I've even seen dogs handled on the marks called back in a field trial. Go figure??

    Angie

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    John,
    Hunt tests are against a standard where you need overall avg of 7 with minimum of 5 in each category. So yes, a handle can allow you to still achieve that pass or callbavk

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    Are you typically only allowed one handle in a given test. For example, you had to handle on the land series, therefore you may not be able to on the water series (if needed)?

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    Senior Member Buzz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angie B View Post
    Yes,,, Not all handles are created equal. I've even seen dogs handled on the marks called back in a field trial. Go figure??

    Angie
    I've seen dogs handle and place...
    "For everyone to whom much is given, of him shall much be required." -- Luke 12:48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mastercaster View Post
    Are you typically only allowed one handle in a given test. For example, you had to handle on the land series, therefore you may not be able to on the water series (if needed)?
    Not always the case. Sometimes two handles if good quick handles. Sometimes not one if not quick and clean.
    Tom Dorroh

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    Senior Member Dos Patos's Avatar
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    Quick and clean is the key.Most of the hunt test in 10 plus years of running though very few were passed.

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    Administrator Chris Atkinson's Avatar
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    I think the other thing to consider is the notion of handling "IN" the area of the fall, versus handling "TO" the fall.

    It's been written and said that "not all handles are created equally".

    Another passage written in some rulebooks is "A crisp handle is preferable to a long hunt".

    I think that, much is within the judges' interpretation. I think a good set of judges will evaluate the overall situation and not come into it with too many preconceived notions.
    "Determining and applying the criteria for when and when not to use correction is the essence of the art of dog training. I make a distinction between a mistake and a lack of effort." - Mike Lardy - Volume I "After Collar Conditioning"

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    Senior Member Scott Shafer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Atkinson View Post

    Another passage written in some rulebooks is "A crisp handle is preferable to a long hunt".
    Chris

    Any idea which rule book says that ??????

    Thank you

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