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Thread: Nipping noise in the bud

  1. #1
    Senior Member leemac's Avatar
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    Default Nipping noise in the bud

    I'm ready to pull the trigger on my second dog. I've settled on a potential breeding that could produce some extemelly talented pups but they have potential for being vocal at the line. I have been researching vocalization solutions and have found some good ideas on correcting vocalization on marks etc. but not much on preventing noise problems. Are there any puppy programs or other articles out there that address preventing this type of issue? I want to make sure to educate myself as much as possible before I get my new pup so I won't create problems that could be avoided.
    "That's a fine dog you got there son. Looks like one of ya'll got the brains and the other one got the driver's license.".

  2. #2
    Senior Member 2tall's Avatar
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    There are a lot of nice breedings out there. Why take a chance on a pup from a line KNOWN for it? I know for sure noise is not all genetics, but it sure is a misery for those that get stuck with it. Too many friends having to make hard choices.
    Carol,
    Owned and handled by Cruisin' with Indiana Jones, JH
    Alternate Handler: Westwind Buffalo Soldier
    Apprentice Handler: Snake River Medicine Man, JH
    http://newhoperetrievers.com

  3. #3
    Senior Member Colonel Blimp's Avatar
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    but not much on preventing noise problems.
    I agree with 2tall, why put yourself on to the back foot when there is an alternative?

    The first and most effective way of preventing any risk is to identify the hazard and then avoid it. You've done the first bit; why not do the simple thing?

    Noise IMO has three causal components; breeding, training, and environment. If the dog's a yapper by nature, that's what you get, a natural yapper. If you over expose even a nominally quiet dog to excitement (typically too many marks too early) it yaps. It's also infectious; one dog can catch it from another. If you start out with a yapper, then any mistakes in training or exposure will be magnified and probably become ineradicable.

    Do the simple thing .. walk.

    Eug
    Last edited by Colonel Blimp; 11-13-2012 at 02:46 PM.
    Thank you, very kind, Mine's a pint.

  4. #4
    Senior Member leemac's Avatar
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    I've chosen this breeding because the dame is an excellent dog I would love to own. I trained with the sire as a pup and was astonished at his promise from an early age. His performance so far I'm in this year's National is just conformation of his ability. I know its a coin toss as to what I get but I'm hoping for that once in a lifetime dog and this pedigree gives me that potential.
    Last edited by leemac; 11-13-2012 at 03:18 PM. Reason: I can't spell.
    "That's a fine dog you got there son. Looks like one of ya'll got the brains and the other one got the driver's license.".

  5. #5
    Senior Member DarrinGreene's Avatar
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    There are two ways, and only two ways to discourage a behavior...

    Punishment and extinction

    How you choose to implement those principals is entirely up to you.

    The first thing would be don't ever reward it, ever!
    Darrin Greene

  6. #6
    Member Kyle Kitchens's Avatar
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    I got a noisy pup from a breeding that I loved without knowing about the noise issue. I LOVE my dog but I would choose a breeding without that trait if i were you.
    Fairwinds Gunrunner "Gunner"

  7. #7
    Senior Member Mary Lynn Metras's Avatar
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    I would avoid getting the pup if you have a choice!!
    HRCH Scaupgetters Tarnation QAA
    HR Blackie 2 CGN, WCI
    Metras's Hashtag Mickey
    Pink Lady



    "Knowing how important right timing is in accomplishing right actions"
    Uncle Ray

  8. #8
    Senior Member leemac's Avatar
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    Ok. I expected this response. But if you look at this breedings pedigree and then look at the Entry Express list of the parents of the dogs currently participating in the Nationals why are there so many dogs dominating the field trial circuit with "the vocal gene"? I know its there. I want to know what I can do to sway my odds to not having a major issue with it.
    "That's a fine dog you got there son. Looks like one of ya'll got the brains and the other one got the driver's license.".

  9. #9
    Senior Member tripsteer1's Avatar
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    I have 18mo. lab male with what could have been a real noise problem. If you want opinion PM me and I will tell you what worked for me..

  10. #10
    Senior Member TBell's Avatar
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    Why the big secret. Just tell what worked for you to help all interested. This seems to be a common problem these days.

    I have a Ford son who was extremely high powered and was completely out of control by 6 months of age using traditional training methods. Even took him to a big name pro's seminar, and his only advice was send him to a pro.

    Well I took his advice and sent him to a pro. To this day at eight years old, he is still a handful and can be vocal at times. I truly believe if I had used Hillmann's puppy method from day 1 with him, that we would have avoided the majority of the noise and creeping issues that I've had to deal with his entire life.

    This is why I am such a firm believer in the method. Hillmann's method teaches the pup what 'sit' really means, and it teaches them patience. I have used Hillmann's method on every one of the above dog's pups and not one of them have had noise or creeping issues.

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