vocalizing - how to prevent it
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Thread: vocalizing - how to prevent it

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    Senior Member Tobias's Avatar
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    Default vocalizing - how to prevent it

    the recent threads about vocalizing have made me want to know how do you prevent vocalizing with a pup?

    I was watching youtube video of a 16 week old bitch pup that barked (multiple times) because she was not allowed to make a retrieve 'when she wanted'. Handler released her shortly after the mark landed and she made the retrieve.

    Seems like a vocalizing issue in the making?

    If you have a pup (too young for formal ob) who is whining or making noise before being released for a mark - whether that is hand thrown/tossed, or a 'real mark' - how do you control the noise without dampening the drive?

    I have not had a pup like this, and hope I never do.

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    teach it to speak on command.
    Gentle in what you do. Firm in how you do it.

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    Senior Member captainjack's Avatar
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    I see a lot of people, even with high drive dogs, giving a lot of noise, hey-heying, shooting a pistols, blowing a duck call, etc. before throwing a mark. With most dogs I don't do any of this until the steadiness habit is ingrained.

    Lardys TRT, if you pay attention, and Hillmann's puppy program both will lead to quiet pups on the line.

    Lardy says not to reduce the standard, but to simplify. He also emphasizes attitude, balance, and control. Following the Hillmann puppy DVD helped me understand what this means.


    One thing I know is that if you don't deal with it, you'll be posting another thread here later on looking for help.
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    Senior Member Todd Caswell's Avatar
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    Everyone I have seen is lack of OB, and a learned behavior where it is the routine. Never give them what they want when they make noise and you will never have a problem... Give them what they want and have problems forever...

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    Senior Member Todd Caswell's Avatar
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    If you have a pup (too young for formal ob) who is whining or making noise before being released for a mark - whether that is hand thrown/tossed, or a 'real mark' - how do you control the noise without dampening the drive?

    A noisy puppy with drive is no better than a quiet puppy with no drive , there both worthless. Balance is the key, read the dog........

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    Senior Member Mary Lynn Metras's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by captainjack View Post
    I see a lot of people, even with high drive dogs, giving a lot of noise, hey-heying, shooting a pistols, blowing a duck call, etc. before throwing a mark. With most dogs I don't do any of this until the steadiness habit is ingrained.

    Lardys TRT, if you pay attention, and Hillmann's puppy program both will lead to quiet pups on the line.

    Lardy says not to reduce the standard, but to simplify. He also emphasizes attitude, balance, and control. Following the Hillmann puppy DVD helped me understand what this means.


    One thing I know is that if you don't deal with it, you'll be posting another thread here later on looking for help.
    Or sending the dog to a farm or making it a pet!
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    I think that a very good discussion on this site would deal with ways to prevent this problem from occuring in young puppies. I know every one knows the basics, but I would like to hear from people like Randy Bohn who have had to deal with this problem many times. I have a young puppy now that I feel could very easily go down this path if I am not careful. I have also seen many pro trained dogs that have a noise level far above what I like.

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    Olddog Randy has discussed this topic in depth many times, just do a search on this topic.

    Like smokey the bear says " Only YOU can prevent forest fires " same holds true to being vocal.

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    Senior Member Terry Marshall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobias View Post
    the recent threads about vocalizing have made me want to know how do you prevent vocalizing with a pup?

    I was watching youtube video of a 16 week old bitch pup that barked (multiple times) because she was not allowed to make a retrieve 'when she wanted'. Handler released her shortly after the mark landed and she made the retrieve.

    Seems like a vocalizing issue in the making?

    If you have a pup (too young for formal ob) who is whining or making noise before being released for a mark - whether that is hand thrown/tossed, or a 'real mark' - how do you control the noise without dampening the drive?

    I have not had a pup like this, and hope I never do.
    Worst thing you can do... No retreive and grab the snout and berate and put back in the kennel
    There is something about the outside of a dog which makes the inside of man feel good

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    Senior Member DarrinGreene's Avatar
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    You have to treat every puppy you raise as an individual. Some may need drive building exercises and some may need to learn to relax. It depends on the pup. The programs are great but you have to assess what you have in front of you and act accordingly. Lots of free retrieves with a high drive pup in the name of building drive that's already there can lead to some very high energy. Controlling that energy later on can be a challenge when it comes out as a vocalization.

    Obedience is the catch all term for the answer but it's actually more specific. Obedience teaches the dog what it must do to get a retrieve, namely be quiet and keep the handler in mind. The relaxation is what you're really after and obedience teaches this.

    Some people will stand on line for 10 minutes waiting for a pup to get the energy out before throwing a mark. Some people... Waiting for appropriate behavior is also part of the solutions we have discussed here with experts like Randy.

    You can do all the obedience you like and if you send them while they are noisy... they will be more noisy
    Last edited by DarrinGreene; 12-26-2015 at 07:17 AM.
    Darrin Greene

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