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Thread: Five dollar words

  1. #51
    Senior Member Ken Bora's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Bill View Post
    . As a beer drinking rowdy teen, however, we thought it was kool to litter the ditches in that manner.

    UB
    for my mates and I, mail boxes and road signs were in our ken.
    "So what is big is not always the Trout nor the Deer but the chance, the being there. And what is full is not necessarily the creel nor the freezer, but the memory." ~ Aldo Leopold

    "The Greatest Obstacle to Discovery is not Ignorance -- It is the Illusion of Knowledge" ~ Daniel Boorstin

  2. #52
    Senior Member road kill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by murral stark View Post
    Why do some of you among us speak with what I call "Five dollar words"? By throwing out those fancy words, does that make you feel superior to others without the vocabulary you have aquired? Just curious is all.
    It is not so much the value of the words as it is the economy of their dispatch!!!!!
    Stan b & Elvis

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Bora View Post
    todays word "pertinacious" is a good un!
    I enjoy the word of the day email.
    Murral, sign up for it and you'll be talkin with so many $5 words your work force will be needing a debit card to know what you are telling them to do!!!!! click http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/ scroll to bottom and add email address
    The majority of the people that work for me, barely speak english, let alone understand the words that I would learn. Kinda like when they are trying to tell me something in broken english. they get frustrated because they can't tell me what they want to say and I look at them with that "deer in the headlights" look. Luckily, my fellow supervisor is fluent in both languages. I am glad that I finally started a thread that everyone enjoys. It has been some interesting reading to say the least.

  4. #54
    Senior Member JDogger's Avatar
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    We talk about the value of words. We may subscribe to MW word-a-day websites. We may endeavor to learn a new word every day and use it in a sentence. What do we really know about the loom of language? The origins of the words we use every day as opposed to those that we use infrequently?
    To know the origin of words is to know how men think.
    Our language is truly international. The American speech, like the American people, comes from all over the world. Not two percent of our English words first rose in the British Isles.

    (Which may dispute the English only argument so favored by many.)

    Somewhere in the Near East they seem to have started, in that Garden of Eden of earliest man, brought home by the three restless mingler’s, the soldier, the trader, and the priest.
    So we have our modern American language. It includes Greek, Latin, and other Indo-Asian, as well as Germanic, and Celtic words.

    G’night, JD
    One cannot reason someone out of something they were not reasoned into. - Jonathan Swift

  5. #55
    Senior Member MooseGooser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HPL View Post
    This IS a fun thread, and even though I suspect that it may have been started with at least a little malicious intent it has turned out to be convivial and pretty informative.

    Sequacious is just a mean word, but pertinacious can swing either way. I would not expect anyone using either one to be particularly servile (another somewhat mean word).


    I'm Out!!

    See,, Simple words!

    Gooser
    It is far easier to spit on the work of others than it is to produce something better yourself.
    Brynmoors Prairie Sage JH ​(Sage) Just a dang fool huntin Dawg
    HRCH Calypso Seven Bales High SH (Bailey)
    HR Calypso Zoomin Loosies Mad Hader (Maddi) We loved you baby. R.I.P.
    FlatLanders Broken Pistol Ricochet SH (Flinch)


    My Christian Name is Michael Baker..
    I have gone by "Gooser" since I was a "gossling"

  6. #56
    Senior Member HPL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDogger View Post
    We talk about the value of words. We may subscribe to MW word-a-day websites. We may endeavor to learn a new word every day and use it in a sentence. What do we really know about the loom of language? The origins of the words we use every day as opposed to those that we use infrequently?
    To know the origin of words is to know how men think.
    Our language is truly international. The American speech, like the American people, comes from all over the world. Not two percent of our English words first rose in the British Isles.

    (Which may dispute the English only argument so favored by many.)

    Somewhere in the Near East they seem to have started, in that Garden of Eden of earliest man, brought home by the three restless mingler’s, the soldier, the trader, and the priest.
    So we have our modern American language. It includes Greek, Latin, and other Indo-Asian, as well as Germanic, and Celtic words.

    G’night, JD
    Although I don't know the origin of any of the words in this sentence, I would bet that many of those with more extensive vocabularies are aware of the roots and origins of many of the words they use. I think that I can often recognize latin and greek origins; not so much middle eastern or germanic. The latin and greek root recognition comes from all the taxonomic stuff in biology. These days, one has to wonder how many "English" words have infiltrated their way back into their tongues of origin since not only do soldiers, traders, and priests pick up words, they must surely leave some behind.
    Any doctrine that weakens personal responsibility for judgment and for action helps create the attitudes that welcome and support the totalitarian state.
    (John Dewey)

    Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for 'tis better to be alone than in bad company.
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  7. #57
    Senior Member JDogger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HPL View Post
    Although I don't know the origin of any of the words in this sentence, I would bet that many of those with more extensive vocabularies are aware of the roots and origins of many of the words they use. I think that I can often recognize latin and greek origins; not so much middle eastern or germanic. The latin and greek root recognition comes from all the taxonomic stuff in biology. These days, one has to wonder how many "English" words have infiltrated their way back into their tongues of origin since not only do soldiers, traders, and priests pick up words, they must surely leave some behind.
    Really?.... when did you speak last to a phone center in another country?

    "Blows my mind regards," JD
    Last edited by JDogger; 11-18-2012 at 09:39 PM.
    One cannot reason someone out of something they were not reasoned into. - Jonathan Swift

  8. #58
    Senior Member HPL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDogger View Post
    Really?.... when did you speak last to a phone center in another country?

    "Blows my mind regards," JD
    Not exactly what I meant. Certainly I am aware that English has in many ways become the lingua franca. I was really referring more to words that started out as latin, greek, arabic, etc., were picked up and Anglicized, and may have now wended their way back into either their language of origin or some other language.
    Any doctrine that weakens personal responsibility for judgment and for action helps create the attitudes that welcome and support the totalitarian state.
    (John Dewey)

    Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for 'tis better to be alone than in bad company.
    (George Washington)

    Gig'em Aggies!! BTCO'77HOO t.u.!!

    www.HughLieck.photoshelter.com

  9. #59
    Senior Member JDogger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HPL View Post
    Not exactly what I meant. Certainly I am aware that English has in many ways become the lingua franca. I was really referring more to words that started out as latin, greek, arabic, etc., were picked up and Anglicized, and may have now wended their way back into either their language of origin or some other language.
    Ok... Gotcha...

    And now the language of the text or the forum post has added another dimension... God help us.
    Last edited by JDogger; 11-18-2012 at 10:37 PM.
    One cannot reason someone out of something they were not reasoned into. - Jonathan Swift

  10. #60
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    I signed up for it. Could turn out to be very interesting. At least now, possibly I will have an idea of what people are saying when they throw out these "5 dollar words". LOL

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