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Thread: Box temp?

  1. #1
    Member Kyle Kitchens's Avatar
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    Default Box temp?

    I just got a new thermometer for my dog box and was just wondering what would be an ideal range to shoot for?
    Fairwinds Gunrunner "Gunner"

  2. #2
    Member Kyle Kitchens's Avatar
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    Come on fellas. Someone has to know.
    Fairwinds Gunrunner "Gunner"

  3. #3
    Senior Member Wayne Nutt's Avatar
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    Default

    You don't provide enough information for anyone to even make a guess. What does "dog box" mean in terms of construction materials?

    In my avatar is my dog box, I expect ambient temperture as there are no outside features to cool it. In the summer I use block ice and the internal fans to cool it along with parking in the shade.
    Wayne Nutt
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  4. #4
    Member Kyle Kitchens's Avatar
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    It's an aluminum insulated dog box. I was just curious what is a good temperature range to look for. I feel confident the box will keep the dog warm I was just wondering what temperature range most people look for.
    Fairwinds Gunrunner "Gunner"

  5. #5

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    I would say it is almost impossible to tell you a set temp to look for. The temp will very depending on the days temp as well as humidity, the position of your box in the sun, wind, and everything in between. You are the one that will have to figure out from your dogs actions if they are comfortable or not? I would not think you would have much to worry about as far as too cold down south unless you are planning a trip north?
    ENJOY THE JOURNEY!!!

  6. #6
    Senior Member JoeOverby's Avatar
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    Kyle, I'm not sure there is a "good range". In the summer I don't want my box much over 80 and in the winter I don't want the dogs to freeze to death. There really is no "range" just common sense. If the box is showing 90+ degrees prob need to do something about it..likewise if the temp in the box is -10 in january you might wanna check it out. I will say however, I am more concerned with the heat here in Ga than the cold. My Ainley does a pretty good job though...I have yet to need to add ice.
    Joe Overby
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  7. #7
    Member Kyle Kitchens's Avatar
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    Thanks guys. I plan on going north a few times this year and do worry more about the heat. I will use common sense I just figured that there was a range that you would want for the inside of the box that I could adjust my vents to try to reach. I will work it out though. Thanks for the replies.
    Fairwinds Gunrunner "Gunner"

  8. #8
    Senior Member DoubleHaul's Avatar
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    My cool remote thermometer has given up the ghost, but it was useful. I think the best thing to do is use it and get to know what temperature is comfortable for the critters. I found that mine didn't seem all that accurate as far as absolute temperature but it was consistent. So I figured if it said, say 80, it was probably less and the dogs were fine. When you are going somewhere new and it gets beyond the boundries you are used to, then do something about it. For example, if you are going north for a summer trip, the heat of the road and the long time in the sun may drive temps higher than you are comfortable with, so might be a good time to stop and cool things down.

  9. #9

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    Don't forget to dry your dogs off before putting them up. Being wet will bake them in the summer and freeze them in the winter.

  10. #10
    Senior Member EdA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle Kitchens View Post
    Thanks guys. I plan on going north a few times this year and do worry more about the heat. I will use common sense I just figured that there was a range that you would want for the inside of the box that I could adjust my vents to try to reach. I will work it out though. Thanks for the replies.
    If it's cold close vents and louvers, put bedding or pads in the crates, dogs generate a lot of heat. I have used cedar shavings but they make a huge mess so I have thick foam kennel pads with Cordura nylon covers. My dogs come out of the crates in SD in December stretching and warm even when the air temps are near zero. I have a 3 hole Deerskin box, I am much more concerned with heat in the summer than cold in the winter, if they are protected from wind they generate heat, 3 dogs particularly stay arm and toasty in an insulated dog box.

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