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Thread: British Labs / No Force????

  1. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by MooseGooser View Post
    I dont want to hyjack a very interesting thread... So,,,please dont respond to what I have to say..

    I am very confused.

    I didnt realise that there was this P+ P- R+R- stuff.
    It intrigued me.

    I took my Transmitter apart this morning to look to see what battery I had in mine... Its just +annd -

    I will keep reading and reserching to figger out where Ya get the Alph designated batteties,, R and P

    Very interesting thread.

    Gooser
    Sounds like you'll be a while before you are ready to tackle a guitar. http://www.guitarnuts.com/wiring/stockstrat.php

    john
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  2. #192
    Senior Member Colonel Blimp's Avatar
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    KM posted
    So, if the game was on a direct line to the other bird, then that would be picked first, and the dog sent back for the longer bird. We do not want our dogs ignoring game here.
    Err ... You are picking up behind the line with a dead bird or two lying in the open. Someone cripples a bird and brings it down with a dead bird(s) between you and it. I always aim to leave dead birds during the drive, and pick only runners and cripples. So I train a form of ladder drill with just that scenario in mind. Not uncommon.

    It's only fair to say that now my lead dog has departed, of the two remaining one is reasonably sure to stop on the whistle by a dead bird and take a big "back" to a cripple, and one isn't!

    Eug
    Last edited by Colonel Blimp; 12-09-2012 at 02:59 PM.
    Thank you, very kind, Mine's a pint.

  3. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colonel Blimp View Post
    KM posted

    Err ... You are picking up behind the line with a dead bird or two lying in the open. Someone cripples a bird and brings it down with a dead bird(s) between you and it. I always aim to leave dead birds during the drive, and pick only runners and cripples. So I train a form of ladder drill with just that scenario in mind. Not uncommon.

    It's only fair to say that now my lead dog has departed, of the two remaining one is reasonably sure to stop on the whistle by a dead bird and take a big "back" to a cripple, and one isn't!

    Eug
    I was referring specifically to trials and tests, where a dog would not be expected to ignore a bird it came across on its path (and would probably be penalised for so doing 'passing over game'). We don't send our dogs directly over dead birds to pick runners. We try to put them on a clear line. Doesn't always work...

  4. #194
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    Quote Originally Posted by kennel maiden View Post
    I was referring specifically to trials and tests, where a dog would not be expected to ignore a bird it came across on its path (and would probably be penalised for so doing 'passing over game'). We don't send our dogs directly over dead birds to pick runners. We try to put them on a clear line. Doesn't always work...

    Good judges over here don't set up that kind of blind. They would never give up the initial line so easily. Poison bird blinds are typically 5-10 degreees off of the correct line, with factors in the field or water creating suction towards the poison bird and a "TRAP" on the other side of the correct line that will cause the dog to go out of sight of the handler and judges. The most difficult ones will have the poison bird equidistant or nearly so with the blind bird.

    Your FT game has it's own set of difficulties. Some fail to grasp that. They need to try to line their dog over a sheep fence. They'd "get it" then......-Paul
    Last edited by paul young; 12-09-2012 at 03:52 PM.
    there's no good reason to fatten up a retriever.

  5. #195
    Senior Member Breck's Avatar
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    at field trials over here we don't place poison birds directly on the path to a blind. We will however pluck duck feathers or dip a stinky duck in water and fling it around to Baptise the ground that is directly on the path to the blind.
    I will say that a dog well trained on poison birds and understands the game can be handled off of a poison bird that is very close to the line.
    I recall sitting in the field throwing a poison bird in towards the line to the blind. It fell within a few yards, way closer than you would want. Anyway, an accomplished field champion is running the blind and to my amazement as the dog approaches the poison bird, without breaking stride or even looking at the bird, she literally jumped over it and continued the blind. No lie.
    "Darla" AFC Candlewoods Lil Smokin Tequila (2002-2013)(fondly remembered)
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  6. #196
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    Quote Originally Posted by Breck View Post
    at field trials over here we don't place poison birds directly on the path to a blind. We will however pluck duck feathers or dip a stinky duck in water and fling it around to Baptise the ground that is directly on the path to the blind.
    I will say that a dog well trained on poison birds and understands the game can be handled off of a poison bird that is very close to the line.
    I recall sitting in the field throwing a poison bird in towards the line to the blind. It fell within a few yards, way closer than you would want. Anyway, an accomplished field champion is running the blind and to my amazement as the dog approaches the poison bird, without breaking stride or even looking at the bird, she literally jumped over it and continued the blind. No lie.
    34. Repeated evidence of poor nose is in itself sufficient justification for elimination from the stake. Because scenting conditions are affected by so many factors, Judges should exercise extreme caution in invoking this penalty


    Perhaps she had a "poor nose"

    john
    Last edited by john fallon; 12-09-2012 at 04:33 PM.
    "i guess the old saying 'those of us that think we know everything annoy those of you that does' " --bobbyb 9/13/06

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  7. #197
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    Quote Originally Posted by Breck View Post
    at field trials over here we don't place poison birds directly on the path to a blind. We will however pluck duck feathers or dip a stinky duck in water and fling it around to Baptise the ground that is directly on the path to the blind.
    I will say that a dog well trained on poison birds and understands the game can be handled off of a poison bird that is very close to the line.
    I recall sitting in the field throwing a poison bird in towards the line to the blind. It fell within a few yards, way closer than you would want. Anyway, an accomplished field champion is running the blind and to my amazement as the dog approaches the poison bird, without breaking stride or even looking at the bird, she literally jumped over it and continued the blind. No lie.
    Breck, your opening statement is contradicted by your concluding statement.
    Renee P

  8. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul young View Post
    Good judges over here don't set up that kind of blind. They would never give up the initial line so easily. Poison bird blinds are typically 5-10 degreees off of the correct line, with factors in the field or water creating suction towards the poison bird and a "TRAP" on the other side of the correct line that will cause the dog to go out of sight of the handler and judges. The most difficult ones will have the poison bird equidistant or nearly so with the blind bird.

    Your FT game has it's own set of difficulties. Some fail to grasp that. They need to try to line their dog over a sheep fence. They'd "get it" then......-Paul
    According to my calculations, 5 degrees from the line to the blind means the poison bird lands about 6 yards from the line to the blind if thrown at 50 yards, and it lands about 9 yards from the line if thrown at 100 yards.

    Yikes. I got work to do!
    Renee P

  9. #199
    Senior Member Breck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitty View Post
    Breck, your opening statement is contradicted by your concluding statement.
    My example is from a training day not a field trial.
    "Darla" AFC Candlewoods Lil Smokin Tequila (2002-2013)(fondly remembered)
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  10. #200
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    Quote Originally Posted by john fallon View Post
    34. Repeated evidence of poor nose is in itself sufficient justification for elimination from the stake. Because scenting conditions are affected by so many factors, Judges should exercise extreme caution in invoking this penalty


    Perhaps she had a "poor nose"

    john
    John, Maybe you meant this as a joke but why insult someone's dog?
    Renee P

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