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Thread: British Labs / No Force????

  1. #31
    Senior Member GulfCoast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishduck View Post
    I have witnessed very nice British dogs. No arguments here that they can and will perform the task. .
    I hope one of 'em was mine!

    Quote Originally Posted by fishduck View Post
    I have never met a person who trained with a current modern e collar program that returned to their old program
    I did it both ways, and I can say that there are PLENTY of adversives in "British" training, and I would not hang up my ecollar and go back, either.

    Have a good day.
    Wm. Mark Edwards
    Pascagoula, MS

    HRCH (500) UH Ellie Mae MH
    SHR Tipsy

  2. #32
    Senior Member fishduck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GulfCoast View Post
    I hope one of 'em was mine!



    I did it both ways, and I can say that there are PLENTY of adversives in "British" training, and I would not hang up my ecollar and go back, either.

    Have a good day.
    Ellie Mae is always the dog I think about when the British stereotype is presented. She is simply a very nice lab that anyone would be happy to have in the blind.
    Mark Land

  3. #33
    Senior Member Colonel Blimp's Avatar
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    Has anyone out there seen a dog that would consistently handle a poison bird in a hunting situation that was trained without being force fetched, or without force to get the dog pasted the poison bird and on the the cripple that would be lost if it was not retrieved first?
    Yupp. Mine. And lots of others. If you pick up on driven shoots, it's a basic tool of the trade. Very often you'll send your dog for a pricked bird that's still in the air and planing on for hundreds of yards and he'll have to pass a lot of dead ones on the way. On other occasions there will be a few dead birds lying in the open with a runner amongst them.

    Do these no force british labs hunt woodcock? Not too many dogs will pick them up without forcing.
    Again, mine do. So do the others I see around.

    The British trainers have such bad teeth the dogs are having a hard time understanding them.
    And the appallingly bad manners of the dogs in the US are all too clearly reflected in their handlers who themselves are easily distinguished by their wobbly fat arses and waddling gait.

    Eug
    Last edited by Colonel Blimp; 12-05-2012 at 02:54 PM.
    Thank you, very kind, Mine's a pint.

  4. #34
    Senior Member mitty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colonel Blimp View Post
    Yupp. Mine. And lots of others. If you pick up on driven shoots, it's a basic tool of the trade. Very often you'll send your dog for a pricked bird that's still in the air and planing on for hundreds of yards and he'll have to pass a lot of dead ones on the way. On other occasions there will be a few dead birds lying in the open with a runner amongst them.

    Eug
    The poison bird scenarios I've seen in AKC events involve sending the dog on a blind retrieve, after it has seen shot bird. It has to ignore the shot bird and get the bird it didn't see fall. I think the scenario you have described involves a dog ignoring fallen birds as it is going to a shot bird that it has marked?
    Renee P

  5. #35
    Senior Member Colonel Blimp's Avatar
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    Renee,

    Either or both. On a driven shoot the dog won't see a bird fall he'll see dozens, and still be expected to take whatever line he's given; if you fluff it up in a Trial that's you on the bus home just as Robert described. On the first drive last Monday five dogs picked 120 birds, so one falling out of the sky is hardly a novelty.

    Eug
    Last edited by Colonel Blimp; 12-05-2012 at 02:49 PM.
    Thank you, very kind, Mine's a pint.

  6. #36
    Senior Member mitty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colonel Blimp View Post
    Renee,

    Either or both. On a driven shoot the dog won't see a bird fall he'll see dozens, and still be expected to take whatever line he's given; if you fluff it up in a Trial that's you on the bus home just as Robert described. On the first drive last Monday five dogs picked 120 birds, so one falling out of the sky is hardly a novelty.

    Eug
    Thanks, as another poster wrote it does indeed seem that comparing the trials is "apples and oranges."
    Renee P

  7. #37
    Senior Member mitty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leemac View Post
    Has anyone out there seen a dog that would consistently handle a poison bird in a hunting situation that was trained without being force fetched, or without force to get the dog pasted the poison bird and on the the cripple that would be lost if it was not retrieved first?

    British or American or Chinese is of no consequence.
    I am not using force to train my dog to leave poison birds. She doesn't get to hunt much, and we are not real advanced, so I can't (yet) answer the part about "hunting" and "consistently." This is the way I learned to teach it from the Lardy TRT program.
    Renee P

  8. #38
    Senior Member shawninthesticks's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Colonel Blimp;

    And the appallingly bad manners of the dogs in the US are all too clearly reflected in their handlers who themselves are easily distinguished by their wobbly fat arses and waddling gait.

    Eug[/QUOTE].

    We have wobbly fat arses cause we still have our teeth at age 20..
    Shawn White

    HR Big Creek Retrievers Independence Day JH QAA "Indy "

  9. #39
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    Yellow machine and Shawn White, grow up a little and keep the insults to yourselves, if you have nothing decent to write then don't bother.
    This forum doesn't need that crap, looks bad for the forum.
    Last edited by Dooley; 12-05-2012 at 04:13 PM.

  10. #40
    Senior Member mitty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dooley View Post
    Yellow machine and Shawn White, grow up a little and keep the insults to yourselves, if you have nothing decent to write then don't bother.
    This forum doesn't need that crap, looks bad for the forum.
    They're called jokes, not insults.

    Maybe not good jokes but jokes none the less.
    Renee P

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