The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Outdoor Media
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Puppy ? First to ......?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    1,105

    Default Puppy ? First to ......?

    When watching a litter, ist here any merit to documenting the first to do stuff like open eyes, walk, get out of the box, pick something up and carry it and all the puppy stuff they do?
    I have a 2 week old litter, line bred on Coolwaters Ready To Go and intend to keep 3, maybe 4 intending to look for an outstanding HT prospect, maybe trials if the talent is there. I'll keep them at least thru FF and transition, then pick one to continue with if I see something I like.
    Comments?

  2. #2
    Senior Member firehouselabs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Currently middle of the "Great" Plains- Ord NE
    Posts
    2,011

    Default

    Generally my "firsties" are the most dominant/independent/feisty. They also tend to be my "picks" of the litter. I like picking the brattiest one of the bunch, the first to climb (and keep climbing/escaping) out of the whelping pool, because they tend to show a boldness to explore on their own and a good sense of adventure and intelligence, not to mention tenacity!

    Generally, it is the same pup or one of two that seem to hit all of the milestones first as well.

    Love the breeding by the way, I wanted to breed to Ready but they have very limited frozen left and Alex said that they are having to use 4 straws per breeding due to freezing/thawing issues.
    Raina Anderson WWW.FIREHOUSELABS.COM

    According to this BMI chart, I am too short !!!


  3. #3
    Senior Member Aussie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    2,299

    Default

    I have had a little to do with puppy tests for various organisations in Australia, as a breeder and observer. Big country, less people and less dogs than the US. Most of our tests are based on US criteria, so may as well add my thoughts.

    The problem with the breeders observations is that the litter are comfortable (habitated) to their home. Testing and observations can be limited also due to breeders scent. I certainly am not allowed to speak when testing is being performed.

    They are all big on testing observations on new floor surfaces (I recently posted a thread on this topic).

    I think the tests are poor indicators. I think observing the sire and dam are more important and which (required) traits are genetic.

    Nevertheless would love love love to test US field litters for a month or two!!! Flying around the country.

    Email if you would like a copy of testing procedures.
    Field trial labradors, the wind beneath my wings,

    sometimes poop under my boots.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    1,105

    Default

    Aussie, please e mail to mperry1169@aol.com

    Thanks
    MP

  5. #5
    Senior Member Miriam Wade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    3,488

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Aussie View Post
    I have had a little to do with puppy tests for various organisations in Australia, as a breeder and observer. Big country, less people and less dogs than the US. Most of our tests are based on US criteria, so may as well add my thoughts.

    The problem with the breeders observations is that the litter are comfortable (habitated) to their home. Testing and observations can be limited also due to breeders scent. I certainly am not allowed to speak when testing is being performed.

    They are all big on testing observations on new floor surfaces (I recently posted a thread on this topic).

    I think the tests are poor indicators. I think observing the sire and dam are more important and which (required) traits are genetic.

    Nevertheless would love love love to test US field litters for a month or two!!! Flying around the country.

    Email if you would like a copy of testing procedures.
    I had a Newfoundland years ago that I bred a few times based on her having her CH, CD, WD and DD titles. I relied on testing in placing her pups and every dog that went to a conformation and/or working home went on to garner titles. I agree with Aussie about observing sire and dam IF the breeder has done their part in terms of socialization and providing an environment where the pups are confident and well cared for. If they haven't, I think testing will show evidence of it and I'd probably move on no matter how good the pedigree. Years ago, I was asked to puppy test a litter of field dogs and told I could have one -gratis. I was not impressed by the living conditions of the dogs and when I tested the pups it was clear that they hadn't been interacted with and were the polar opposite of bold and confident, so I turned down my free pup.

    Years after that I had a deposit down on a pup and wasn't able to fly to pick her out. This breeder I trusted implicitly. I ended up with the dog I have now because both the breeder and stud dog owner liked him so much that I ended up with a dog instead of a bitch. No regrets!! If I ever breed again (not a high priority) I will "puppy test" because I think there are some merits to it.

    To answer the original question: I chose my Kate because she was the one who didn't pile with the litter. She was very independent and I liked that. It translated into a very confident and independent dog, but biddable because she respected me. I didn't know that field events existed at the time, so don't know if I would have chosen differently if I had.

    M
    Last edited by Miriam Wade; 12-09-2012 at 05:55 AM.
    "You can put pressure on a dog, you canít take it backÖ"

    Mitch Patterson '07

    MHR Wadin's Katie Lied CD, SH, WCX (11/25/93-1/27/07 Rest Well Kate)
    Brassfire's Brass in Pocket JH, WCX ** (4 Master passes)
    Brassfire's New England Patriot (New Pup!!!)

  6. #6
    Senior Member windycanyon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    3,831

    Default

    I love to watch and take notes, generally at or shortly after birth, and again at 2, 4, 6, and close to 8 wks to see if and how personalities change. I also note how the pups respond to the early neurological stimulation (super puppy) program -- do they adjust w/ time or do they continue to fight being held upside down and/or on their backs?

    Has anyone else noticed a trend in their litters of the first 2 born seeming to be the most independent/bratty??? 3 wk old litter here... Anne

  7. #7
    Senior Member helencalif's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    in the mountains at Lake Almanor, CA
    Posts
    2,008

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by windycanyon View Post
    I love to watch and take notes, generally at or shortly after birth, and again at 2, 4, 6, and close to 8 wks to see if and how personalities change. I also note how the pups respond to the early neurological stimulation (super puppy) program -- do they adjust w/ time or do they continue to fight being held upside down and/or on their backs?

    Has anyone else noticed a trend in their litters of the first 2 born seeming to be the most independent/bratty??? 3 wk old litter here... Anne
    I document everything and save those puppy notes. There have been some surprises. One of our female puppies was a sweet cuddler, seemed birdy, but she was not THE outstanding puppy on any of the puppy tests we gave to the litter. At almost 2 years of age, she is outstanding in marking, style, focus, is watery, is very birdy, and is extremely intelligent. Hang onto your hat when she comes to the line. She should go places.
    Helen

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •