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Thread: Heeling Techniques

  1. #1
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    Default Heeling Techniques

    Does anyone have any ideas on heeling techniques or drills or ways to keep him from bolting ahead while walking. This is the one thig that we are having a hard time with.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Wayne Nutt's Avatar
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    Get a pinch collar. It will stop immediately. See video below. This dog would practically drag me off my feet. There was a previous thread by Chris, I think, on use of the pinch collar.
    http://www.retrievertraining.net/for...ghlight=OB+101
    Last edited by Wayne Nutt; 12-12-2012 at 03:09 PM.
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    Senior Member DarrinGreene's Avatar
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    Turn into him and bump him in the face with your outside knee.
    Darrin Greene

  4. #4

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    Keep him close with the lead. Every time he pulls it tight, snatch the lead. Rattle his cage a few hundred times he will stop.
    As he gets better I leave the lead on but drop it on the ground. If he gets out ahead I step on the lead.
    It's also good to constantly talk to him while walking " look at me (snap fingers), good (if he is where you want him), look at me, ahh, back up" This keeps him focused on you and he begins to detect the difference in your tone as he drifts out or ahead. Keep changing directions so he learns to watch you.

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    Senior Member bjoiner's Avatar
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    Look up the Keeler method of obedience. I think that's how you spell it. Basically you hold the dog responsible for being in the right place. Lead in the opposite hand as the dog was in with some slack in that hand. If the dog goes ahead, turn the opposite direction and use the slack in the off hand to give a jerk correction. Also turn into the dog if it won't turn with you. Lead with your knee without telegraphing and walk through the dog. The dog will quickly learn its place to walk. Use minimal vocal commands. The dog should be there on its own. Remember to keep attitude up. Depending on the dog, praise for good and maybe give a few happy bumpers.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member Breck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarrinGreene View Post
    Turn into him and bump him in the face with your outside knee.
    This is a very bad idea. You will want your dog to move with you at heel while looking out into field. A pivot of your foot or turning being the cue. Don't want dog thinking about getting kneed in the face and looking up at you every time you want to adjust your dog at heel.

    The easiest trick to use to teach thye proper heel position is to use a "belly loop" with a 6' lead. Just clip to collar, run lead along back, down and around belly and back up thru lead on his back to form a loop. Simply tug up gently on lead to apply pressure to belly and dog will back up right quick. Simple.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member DarrinGreene's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Breck View Post
    This is a very bad idea. You will want your dog to move with you at heel while looking out into field. A pivot of your foot or turning being the cue. Don't want dog thinking about getting kneed in the face and looking up at you every time you want to adjust your dog at heel.
    I didn't say give the dog a concussion. I said BUMP him. If you hit the dog so hard and so many times he can't be taught to push/pull cleanly, shame on ya.

    When will I learn?
    Last edited by DarrinGreene; 12-12-2012 at 08:04 PM.
    Darrin Greene

  8. #8
    Senior Member Breck's Avatar
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    Darrin, you missed the point.
    Consider how you might improve your handling skills and better communicate with your dog if you did not use your knee at all.
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  9. #9
    Senior Member DarrinGreene's Avatar
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    The point is Breck, you have your method and I have mine. I didn't make it up. It's not an idea. It was taught to me and I have used it on many dogs that have no problem at all with push/pull. Maybe you had a bad experience with it. I don't know. All I do know is that yet again I have stupidly not listened to the many people who have told me that trying to help someone on RTF isn't worth it. There is always a know it all with a better way. One of these days I'll learn to listen.
    Darrin Greene

  10. #10
    Senior Member Jennifer Henion's Avatar
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    So, it's either "bump him in the face with your knee" or "rattle his cage a few hundred times and he will stop" or tie a leash around his belly?

    Surely we can do better than this?

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