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Thread: MILK PRICE and farm bill

  1. #1
    Senior Member luvmylabs23139's Avatar
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    Default MILK PRICE and farm bill

    OK , so I still can't figure any of this out. Can someone explain this to me?
    If some bill that nobody says what it means does not get extended I will now pay $8 for a gallon of milk at the grocery store. But what am I as a federal income tax payer currently paying in taxes for someone elses milk? Other than the 2 weeks around xmas I never even use a quart in a week.
    So, have I been paying another bunch of money for more socialism to pay for the milk someone else consumes????
    Screwed again!
    Hihope Hiland Heathen of Perth CD, RE, CGC, TDI

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    Senior Member luvmylabs23139's Avatar
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    Let me add that if the gooberment has so much control over the price why can I buy a gallon of milk at Sams for less than a half gallon at any of the 3 major grocery stores within 5 minutes of my house?
    I buy milk whenever I go to SAM's because I save money tossing more than half down the drain.
    Hihope Hiland Heathen of Perth CD, RE, CGC, TDI

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    Quote Originally Posted by luvmylabs23139 View Post
    Let me add that if the gooberment has so much control over the price why can I buy a gallon of milk at Sams for less than a half gallon at any of the 3 major grocery stores within 5 minutes of my house?
    I buy milk whenever I go to SAM's because I save money tossing more than half down the drain.
    The milk we buy at the store is really a bargain; the average price paid to the farmer nowadays is around $17 per hundred pounds. The dairy farmers have been struggling to make ends meet for years.

    One of the farms I hunt on has a sign at the end of the driveway. It reads;

    NO FARMS,

    NO FOOD;

    NO FUTURE!

    NOBODY works harder to make a living than a farmer.....-Paul
    there's no good reason to fatten up a retriever.

  4. #4
    Senior Member luvmylabs23139's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul young View Post
    The milk we buy at the store is really a bargain; the average price paid to the farmer nowadays is around $17 per hundred pounds. The dairy farmers have been struggling to make ends meet for years.

    One of the farms I hunt on has a sign at the end of the driveway. It reads;

    NO FARMS,

    NO FOOD;

    NO FUTURE!

    NOBODY works harder to make a living than a farmer.....-Paul
    So still explain who is paying for milk. The taxpayer who may not be using it or >>>>
    Why not let it be fair market?
    I pay federal income taxes. Why do I pay federal income taxes so someone who pays nothing and most likey gets a socialist check from me get a deal on milk?
    Hihope Hiland Heathen of Perth CD, RE, CGC, TDI

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    Quote Originally Posted by paul young View Post
    The milk we buy at the store is really a bargain; the average price paid to the farmer nowadays is around $17 per hundred pounds. The dairy farmers have been struggling to make ends meet for years.

    One of the farms I hunt on has a sign at the end of the driveway. It reads;

    NO FARMS,

    NO FOOD;

    NO FUTURE!

    NOBODY works harder to make a living than a farmer.....-Paul
    My son's in that business, one of the few with a degree. He's into the value added part: hard cheese (award winning, even the stuff not up to his standard is good), fresh cheese & ice cream. Labor (WA has the highest Min wage in the US) & transport are killers. The regulators do not like dealing with the little guys, their bosses get more campaign donations from the big guys . 16 hour days are the norm, but that's what he chose, also takes no govt. handouts . I admire his independence. Though he feeds very little grain his grain has more than doubled in 4 years - ethanol being the driver, which cause farmers to rotate out of small grain into corn more often, creating a shortage of all commodities.

    Most of the stores get their produce & fresh stuff from the same wholesaler - they profess to but don't want to deal with the small guys. Makes a good advertising slogan. As a consumer I source what I eat & will pay more for wholesome products where the animals & farming conditions are a priority to the producer. I can tell the difference as I was raised organic but in those days we just called it food

    $17/cwt will give you about 8 1/2 gallons of whole milk from the farmer. The value added people will skim some cream & manufacture various other commodity like products to make their bottom line presentable but it's a tough business. I have a picture showing a warehouse full of macaroni cheese in a salt mine in MO. Most Cheddar is sold in 100 pound wheels for around $2.00/lb. You do know that if someone advertises bSrt free, that the only one who could verify that is the outfit selling the stuff as there is no test to determine usage or not!

    I'm on an auction list - there are manufacturing facilities going under regularly - big & little ones alike.
    __________________________

    Marvin S

    Everyone's friend is No One's friend

    Someday your life will flash before your eyes. It's your responsibility to make sure it's worth watching!

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    Quote Originally Posted by paul young View Post
    The milk we buy at the store is really a bargain; the average price paid to the farmer nowadays is around $17 per hundred pounds. The dairy farmers have been struggling to make ends meet for years.

    One of the farms I hunt on has a sign at the end of the driveway. It reads;

    NO FARMS,

    NO FOOD;

    NO FUTURE!

    NOBODY works harder to make a living than a farmer.....-Paul
    Thats the truth. I know nothing about farm bills etc. All I know is that while my Mother-in-law was still alive it cost her more to produce the small amount of milk that they ( family members ) used than it would if they had bought it at the stores. The difference was that the milk produced by her cows tasted like milk should !

    Government should never try to fix things because they always mess it up. They said on the news that family farms would not be exempt from the estate tax I believe. Try passing it down to family members and you get hit big time. It is not possible to buy a farm now days and start from scratch unless you are wealthy to start with.
    charly

    There ought to be one day -- just one -- when there is open season on Congressmen.
    ~Will Rogers~

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marvin S View Post
    My son's in that business, one of the few with a degree. He's into the value added part: hard cheese (award winning, even the stuff not up to his standard is good), fresh cheese & ice cream. Labor (WA has the highest Min wage in the US) & transport are killers. The regulators do not like dealing with the little guys, their bosses get more campaign donations from the big guys . 16 hour days are the norm, but that's what he chose, also takes no govt. handouts . I admire his independence. Though he feeds very little grain his grain has more than doubled in 4 years - ethanol being the driver, which cause farmers to rotate out of small grain into corn more often, creating a shortage of all commodities.

    Most of the stores get their produce & fresh stuff from the same wholesaler - they profess to but don't want to deal with the small guys. Makes a good advertising slogan. As a consumer I source what I eat & will pay more for wholesome products where the animals & farming conditions are a priority to the producer. I can tell the difference as I was raised organic but in those days we just called it food

    $17/cwt will give you about 8 1/2 gallons of whole milk from the farmer. The value added people will skim some cream & manufacture various other commodity like products to make their bottom line presentable but it's a tough business. I have a picture showing a warehouse full of macaroni cheese in a salt mine in MO. Most Cheddar is sold in 100 pound wheels for around $2.00/lb. You do know that if someone advertises bSrt free, that the only one who could verify that is the outfit selling the stuff as there is no test to determine usage or not!

    I'm on an auction list - there are manufacturing facilities going under regularly - big & little ones alike.
    Well said I'm sorry to say. By the way if your son does a mail order business, please, send his link etc. to me in a private message. Mother used to order cheese and it was fantastic but I no longer have the info for it.
    charly

    There ought to be one day -- just one -- when there is open season on Congressmen.
    ~Will Rogers~

  8. #8
    Senior Member J Connolly's Avatar
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    Milk has been subsidized for at least 40 years. The idea is that the subsidies stabilize the market. It seems like it is causing over production and marginal profits. The take home lesson about the farm bill is that only about 20% goes to farmers. The rest to food stamps.
    Jan and Mike Connolly
    www.docsgoldens.com

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    Senior Member dback's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Connolly View Post
    The take home lesson about the farm bill is that only about 20% goes to farmers. The rest to food stamps.
    Bingo........easier to sell to general population if you focus on milk prices.......a full 80% of farm bill is food stamps. We're even nice enough to give some to Mexico so the Mexican government can educate their population how to acquire food stamps once they have "immigrated" to the US. Wacky world ain't it?
    "What a difference a week makes. This week I feel like a football coach. Last week I felt like Britney Spears' choreographer."
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    Another way of comparing the milk subsidy/farm bill is through real estate taxes. Even if you do not have any kids in school you are subsidizing those who do because the greatest portion of your property taxes go to the schools.

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