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Thread: Opinions Needed

  1. #11
    Senior Member Moosegoosee's Avatar
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    p.s. we ended up winning the puppy olympics at the end of class! Retrieves, Agility, Obedience...
    jus'sayin'. Stick.with.it.
    "He who has a why to live can bear almost any how."

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tpd5 View Post
    Thanks. I am going to go a few minutes early next week and explain to the instructor my plans and how I am only going to do what works for us.
    Good Approach. It is respectful to the instructor. Don't underestimate the value of teaching the stand command. It can come in handy for vet exams, putting on a dog vest etc. As long as you give a command, such as "stand" when you do it, the pup is not "breaking" the sit command, but rather it is performing another command.

    Have fun!

  3. #13
    Member Todd Herderhurst's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies everyone. Very helpful.

  4. #14
    Senior Member DarrinGreene's Avatar
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    So why wouldn't you want to teach your puppy to stand so the vet can examine him? I'm confused. Starting with luring, then putting the behavior on verbal cue is pretty standard stuff. The dog isn't getting up on his own. He's getting up because you gave him a visual cue in the form of body language. You'll then transition this over to a verbal cue. It seems to me like you might be so wrapped up in what you're doing that you're missing an opportunity to learn something about basic obedience training.

    Bill's stuff is great and certainly has proven results, but learning about the basics of obedience training can't hurt you... or your dog.

    There's something to be learned from every dog trainer you come across. You're missing the opportunity to do that by dismissing the instructor.

    You never did say if you had trouble maintaining a sit with the other pups around when you moved away. I see the instructor's point, esp given that you hadn't spoken to her beforehand.

    You really should consider learning the basics of verbal cues, luring, markers and rewards. It provides a basis for a lot of what you're going to do in the future. Bill's program, like I said, is awesome (yes, I have it) but doesn't address these basic building blocks (not that it should).
    Last edited by DarrinGreene; 01-11-2013 at 08:09 AM.
    Darrin Greene

  5. #15
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    We train field labs and teach beginner obedience as well. I am sure your instructor will understand when you speak to her. We aften tell people who have different needs (such as not wanting an automatic sit because they are showing conformation and need the dog to stack) to use the lessons in the ways that are appropriate for them. As far as the stand is concerned we have had many recommendations for our classes from local vets because of it. The other command that some trialers don't teach is a down. A friend of ours had us teach his dog down because he was wild coming out of his crate. Bob now makes the dog down on the tail gate so he can put the collar on and have control when the dog hits the ground. As far as the use of treats, they are a good motivator or lure in the beginning but we wean them off as the classes progress.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Keith Stroyan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moosegoosee View Post
    ...I worked on sit quietly by myself without drawing attention to myself...
    IF you can do that, keep going. If you're bucking the class, stay home. (You're not the instructor, after all.)
    &
    Join a retriever club.

  7. #17
    Senior Member T-Pines's Avatar
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    Along the lines of Darrin's point, do not get stuck in the frame of mind that every interaction with your pup has to be exactly like the mechanics of the Hillmann Puppy DVD sessions. Those sessions fall within a much bigger, all encompassing philosophy that Bill defines for us in his Puppy DVD.

    This Hillmann philosophy and the key principles should guide you in every interaction with your pup, including walks, play, in the car, in the house ... and puppy obedience classes. Every puppy obedience class I've ever attended could be made to fit within the Hillmann philosophy without making a big deal out of it with the instructor or classmates.

    Your pup is a sponge, ready to soak up all different kinds of lessons. Stay true to the Hillmann philosophy and his principles for your relationship with your pup, but be open to the idea that there are unlimited techniques for applying this philosophy to your interactions with your pup.

    Jim

  8. #18
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    You would be surprised how quickly dogs/pups can learn situational training. That is they learn they can and are expected to do one thing in one place and another in another place. They are little sponges so take advantage of it. Just don't ask the pup to do a stand or recall in the field, yet.
    deb

  9. #19
    Member Todd Herderhurst's Avatar
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    Thank you again everyone. I am open to different methods as I started with treats when he first came home and continue to use them periodically.

    My main concern was that luring him out of a sit to a stand with a treat would confuse him. I honestly did not think anything of it until our first attempt and he would not budge from his sit. That made me wonder if I was sending mixed messages so I stopped.

    I am open to teaching him as many commands as possible, as we are working on down right now using treats.

  10. #20
    Senior Member Golddogs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moosegoosee View Post
    Ohhhh - I totally understand...we train labs and I take my first Jack Russell to a puppy class...I use certain commands that the instructor didn't like...she quickly realized - I wasn't going to obey her! When they worked on stuff that was against my training...I worked on sit quietly by myself without drawing attention to myself... Keep going...don't fret too much...
    Sit nick Sit!!!!!!!
    Never trust a dog to watch your food!

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