The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Outdoor Media
Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 69

Thread: Dead bird cue...how and when to use it

  1. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Pontotoc Ms.
    Posts
    496

    Default

    everyone is a pro and has great dogs on the internet

  2. #22
    Senior Member Wayne Nutt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Ft. Worth, TX
    Posts
    4,045

    Default

    But seldom do you see any videos of the internet experts training their dog.
    Wayne Nutt
    Go Nutts with dog training

    HRCH Patton's Parker Co. Shadow "Shadow"
    HRCH Clineline Hijacker "Jack"
    HRCH Marks a Lot Midnight Hudson, SH "Hudson"-retired
    Castile Creek's Rawhide, SH "Rowdy"

  3. #23
    Senior Member mitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Salt Lake City
    Posts
    2,241

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EdA View Post
    Dog comes to line, looks in the field, no guns, at that point does the dog need a cue or a clue to tell it that this is a blind?
    Just like baby dogs, some of us baby trainers need black and white explanations. Is the answer "no" of course not because duh the dog sees no gunners its obviously a blind...or is the answer "yes" because otherwise the dog is looking around and looking around trying to figure out where the gunners are?

    I'm also wondering about the use of the cue "mark"...I haven't figured out how to use that one either!
    Renee P

  4. #24
    Senior Member Ken Bora's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Burlington, Vermont
    Posts
    11,332

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mitty View Post
    ...I'm also wondering about the use of the cue "mark"...I haven't figured out how to use that one..

    best when it is not a blind
    "So what is big is not always the Trout nor the Deer but the chance, the being there. And what is full is not necessarily the creel nor the freezer, but the memory." ~ Aldo Leopold

    "The Greatest Obstacle to Discovery is not Ignorance -- It is the Illusion of Knowledge" ~ Daniel Boorstin

  5. #25
    Senior Member mitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Salt Lake City
    Posts
    2,241

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Bora View Post
    best when it is not a blind



    ()
    Renee P

  6. #26
    Senior Member Jennifer Henion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Far Northern California
    Posts
    1,276

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EdA View Post
    OK thanks, maybe I'll give it a try
    This reminds me of a joke I heard last night:

    Do you know the difference between God and a surgeon? God doesn't think he's a surgeon.
    Last edited by Jennifer Henion; 01-15-2013 at 11:27 AM.

  7. #27
    Senior Member EdA's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    6,715

    Default

    Those who use verbal cues think they are beneficial, those who do not use verbal cues think they are a useless waste of time. For me I want a dog who is smart enough to tell the difference in the way I behave on line to tell what is coming next. Personal preference is that I do not use cues and key words, for me simple is better for both me and the dog. For those who use them and think they work I say great.

    Since we are on the topic of verbal cues, with poison bird blinds I typically line the dog at the gun before signally for the poison bird. After being released by the judge I sometimes give a quiet no and reheel the dog or just simply reheel them. If the poison bird is thrown very close to the line to the blind I would only adjust the dog's position to reflect that without the no. Usually what you get is not a perfect line but one in the right direction with good momentum. If you make a big deal out of lining them away from the poison bird you often get an over exaggerated line away from the bird which necessitates handling toward the poison bird which can send the dog a mixed message. With my dogs I find that I get a much nicer performance handling away from the poison bird with the first cast which lets them know we are not picking that bird up now. After picking up the blind I will use a verbal cue because that is the way Cherylon teaches them poison birds when they are young. When the cue comes out, "let's go get it" the dogs understand that picking up that bird is now OK and become very animated.

    Verbal cues or no verbal cues, what to do, as a wise man once told me that's why they make vanilla and chocolate. So much for my observations on that topic and my apologies to tjohn3 for the "trick answer"....

  8. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Illinois Wisconsin border
    Posts
    892

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mitty View Post
    Just like baby dogs, some of us baby trainers need black and white explanations. Is the answer "no" of course not because duh the dog sees no gunners its obviously a blind...or is the answer "yes" because otherwise the dog is looking around and looking around trying to figure out where the gunners are?

    I'm also wondering about the use of the cue "mark"...I haven't figured out how to use that one either!

    The problem with cues is there are many programs out there some advocate cues some don't and it is very confusing to a new trainer. Cues in general are a feel good for the handler and don't communicate much to the dog, except When they are done each and every time, same tone of voice, same sequence, for perhaps years in the dog's training life. Example on short birds saying easy bird or easy for over running short memory birds. I do not cue my dogs on dead bird for a blind I do cue for easy bird on short memory birds and tell my dogs where's your mark when coming back to pick up a retired gun does it help? I don't know but it Makes me feel good like I am contributing to the dogs success. Might be all BS but old habits are hard to break for trainers too. Example I have only one sided dogs, used to have two sided,but, could never get the hang of it , mark last bird down one side, memory bird another side, but, not always. I try to keep it simple for myself and the dog. I guess I am a little training challenged, but, we haven't done too bad considering.
    Earl Dillow

  9. #29
    Senior Member Good Dogs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    952

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EdA View Post
    Dog comes to line, looks in the field, no guns, at that point does the dog need a cue or a clue to tell it that this is a blind?
    Maybe not so critical in a FT setup where the blinds are typically run independent of marks. But I think there are circumstances where you must let pup know what's coming up. Retired gun, my cue is "where's your mark" as on long marks. Poison bird, "no bird", "here, dead bird" tells him that we're running a blind and he can forget about the mark he just saw. It's being consistent with commands to a situation.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Rainmaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    NW WI
    Posts
    3,597

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer Henion View Post
    This reminds me of a joke I heard last night:

    Do you know the difference between God and a surgeon? God doesn't think he's a surgeon.
    Some of us are pretty thankful for experienced people like Dr. Ed still willing to play on this forum, and we enjoy the occasional joke. I think his was funnier than yours.
    Kim Pfister, Rainmaker Labs

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •