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Thread: Would you breed a dog that was born with missing teeth?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Brad's Avatar
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    Default Would you breed a dog that was born with missing teeth?

    One of mine was born missing three or four mollars and just had an abssesed tooth removed. I don't plan on breeding her. Just curious if it was hereditery. She had one litter and I havnt heard anything about it with her pups
    She cant afford to lose any more. I don't think it matters with her cause it looks like she inhales her food and doesn't chew

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    Senior Member swampcollielover's Avatar
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    I am not an expert, but my inclination is no?

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    Sometimes missing teeth are hereditary, but sometimes the adult teeth just never develop, or they never erupt.

    That's why you will see stud owners list "Full dentition" as one of the dog's attributes.

    Meredith

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    Senior Member Bridget Bodine's Avatar
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    Labs are missing teeth all the time, in the standard it says "Full dentition is preferred" to me it is not a deal breaker but is part of my evaluation.
    BB
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    Senior Member hotel4dogs's Avatar
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    It would depend on her other qualifications. The more *minor* issues, the better the other qualifications should be. If she's an AFC/FC, the missing teeth aren't quite as important.
    IMHAOWO.

    Barb Gibson
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    Senior Member firehouselabs's Avatar
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    If she was missing "a" tooth, I would have an x-ray shot of the jaw when doing OFA's to see if it was just unerupted due to crowding/impaction. If the tooth is present, then yes. If not present, then I would be taking a hard look at vertical pedigree to see if this is a fluke or something that keeps rearing its ugly head every now and again.
    For more than one tooth, then the answer is no, I would not.
    Happens in people more than you would think, and for those that consider themselves lucky to be missing their wisdom teeth, their children could end up missing their canines (VERY important teeth to have!) or even an incisor.
    I would hate to have this happen with a dog!
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    Senior Member Brad's Avatar
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    sHe is about 5 years old. Nice dog out of FT lines, but with me maybe only hunt test games.
    I know I said I didnt want to breed her, but her pups turned out nice. I keep in the back of my head that I may want to if she turns out ok. Wife keeps telling me to spay her. I dont train enough to know what she could do
    Trying to decide to spay or not.
    Thanks, Brad
    Last edited by Brad; 08-12-2013 at 07:23 PM.

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    Senior Member Bridget Bodine's Avatar
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    A lot of people have no clue that teeth are missing, it is not harmful to the dog. BUT I would not breed to a dog that also had 3-4 missing molars.


    PS I know of a setter that had 11 teeth removed at age 10 and he eats kibble just fine, don't worry too much
    BB
    Sight To Sea Labradors
    Southern Cross at Sight to Sea SH "Crosby" (by NAFC FC AFC Cody Cut a Lean Grade)
    Tealwood's Willing at Sight to Sea JH ( by CH I am Able)
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    Brad
    You asked aboth a dogs teeth. You said you are not planning to bred her. Then you say you bred her and the pups were OK......
    Sorry, your loosing me. Might you be in politics? Don

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by firehouselabs View Post
    If she was missing "a" tooth, I would have an x-ray shot of the jaw when doing OFA's to see if it was just unerupted due to crowding/impaction. If the tooth is present, then yes. If not present, then I would be taking a hard look at vertical pedigree to see if this is a fluke or something that keeps rearing its ugly head every now and again.
    For more than one tooth, then the answer is no, I would not.
    Happens in people more than you would think, and for those that consider themselves lucky to be missing their wisdom teeth, their children could end up missing their canines (VERY important teeth to have!) or even an incisor.
    I would hate to have this happen with a dog!
    Canine teeth are very infrequently missing in humans. Generally occurs only with other hereditary conditions with fairly obvious phenotypical traits. Congenitally absent teeth do seem to run in families and it would have to be a pretty fine specimen of a dog otherwise for me to consider having a litter out of it. In humans the most often congenitally absent teeth are 3rd molars, followed by second premolars and lateral incisors.

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