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Thread: Steady drills

  1. #11
    Senior Member DarrinGreene's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Barnett View Post
    Non retrieves.

    Throw 10 marks and pick them up if he remains steady let him get one as a reward. He's got to learn not every mark is his. After 1 week he will show huge improvement. You might need to add in a gun shot as well.
    You really think a dog can learn that "every mark isn't his" Bob? or is he just getting corrected / avoiding correction in a high distraction environment?
    Darrin Greene

  2. #12
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    A good tool to have to work on steadiness is stand alone singles. Starting with teaching dog to do stand alone singles. I guess I'm plugging Hillman traffice cop scenario . Just my opinion take with a grain of salt
    Gentle in what you do. Firm in how you do it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scum Frog View Post
    This!

    I know most folks around here don't approve of Milner, but he has some great stuff, and this is one of them.
    Been doing this for 6 weeks with my 4 month old YLF. Next step is intro to gun fire.
    Your Dog will be rock steady. It's so simple to do.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarrinGreene View Post
    You really think a dog can learn that "every mark isn't his" Bob? or is he just getting corrected / avoiding correction in a high distraction environment?
    Yes I think they probably learn that but I don't care either way. It's an easy way to steady a dog. When I train with other dogs we do this and then rotate retrieves.

  5. #15
    Senior Member KwickLabs's Avatar
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    After reading the topic, I'd like to suggest steadiness is not a drill.......it is a way of life. With regards to a pup, there is lot to be learned by first reading the link in step number 6 of the posted link.

    There are several "drills" in the "Steady" link that focus on the "expectation". The overall philosophy is engraining (not forcing).

    Steady (link)

    In addition, after the youngster is introduced to the expectation early on, it is necessary to provide regular maintenance. (note: This page was previously posted on RTF.)

    There are several "presentations" discussed that when used regularly emphasize the expectation of remaining steady.

    Being steady is a lot more fun and lasting for a dog when it is a regular expression of "This is what I do" not something driven by "I must do this or else".
    Last edited by KwickLabs; 02-02-2013 at 12:23 PM.
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  6. #16
    Senior Member DarrinGreene's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Barnett View Post
    Yes I think they probably learn that but I don't care either way. It's an easy way to steady a dog. When I train with other dogs we do this and then rotate retrieves.
    Thanks for the reply Bob. Yep, who knows what they're really thinking sometimes... If it works, it works.
    Darrin Greene

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    Quote Originally Posted by DarrinGreene View Post
    You really think a dog can learn that "every mark isn't his" Bob? or is he just getting corrected / avoiding correction in a high distraction environment?
    When I went off to the army my dad took over my lab...He informed me I had spoiled the dog ....Every time you shoot she is expecting to get a bird...And ...I don't kill one every time I shoot...I don't know about the idea of avoiding a correction but I do know they come to expect things to happen in a certain sequence...By not allowing them to pick up every bumper thrown for them it takes away some of the high drive to retrieve in them ...The throws just become less attractive to them...Steve S
    "Your dog learns as much by doing his work right,by your praise and encouragement, as he does by your displeasure and correction." DLWalters

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    Well I'm in north Decatur Texas. Yes i call old school picking up marks myself.
    I do use e collars. All so use other dogs in steady training honor work dog honors me and other dogs.
    Lots of praise
    i just been thanking I've been doing it the same way for around ten years and there is allways
    a different way. I just like to hear about new ideas or concepts not that the way I steady a dog
    Is I out dated but there is a bunch of good informative people
    here that might have a better way.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by KwickLabs View Post
    After reading the topic, I'd like to suggest steadiness is not a drill.......it is a way of life. With regards to a pup, there is lot to be learned by first reading the link in step number 6 of the posted link.

    There are several "drills" in the "Steady" link that focus on the "expectation". The overall philosophy is engraining (not forcing).

    Steady (link)

    In addition, after the youngster is introduced to the expectation early on, it is necessary to provide regular maintenance. (note: This page was previously posted on RTF.)

    There are several "presentations" discussed that when used regularly emphasize the expectation of remaining steady.

    Being steady is a lot more fun and lasting for a dog when it is a regular expression of "This is what I do" not something driven by "I must do this or else".
    Thats quite nice and very detailed Jim, I enjoyed it very much

    Thanks for posting it.

    john
    "i guess the old saying 'those of us that think we know everything annoy those of you that does' " --bobbyb 9/13/06

    "A Good Dog is a Good Dog"

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    I like to teach place you can start with place boards gradually making them smaller and then go to a mat. I have a mat on my front porch when I open the door my dog sits in the house until I go out then I tell him to place and he gets on the mat I leave him there while I load my truck I then ether stand next to him and tell him to heel or stand by my truck and tell him to release I then take the mat with me when I work him. I hunt him off of a stand and by teaching him this I can stand away from him shoot a bird send him he'll bring the bird to me I can then tell him to place and he'll swim back over to his stand and get back on and wait for me to release him again. By using a place board and a mat you set up a clear boundary they have to make a conscious effort to cross which I believe makes them understand more clearly why their getting a correction.
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