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Thread: Cattail removal from training ponds

  1. #21
    Junior Member russhardy's Avatar
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    I tried to use a herbicide called Aquacide and had been told that it works well to eradicate cattails. The active ingredient in it is: Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid...17.5%. Unfortunately, when I called up Aquacide to order some for our Club I found out that they couldn't sell it to me in Alaska unless I had a Pesticide/Herbicide License which is sort of an equivalent of a FFL - except much harder and more expensive to get. In most States this product, and others like it, is available for a regular person without this license and if I lived in WA I would have gotten some and used it.

    For those of you that can not use a herbicide because of land use restrictions (ie perhaps your permit for use on public lands prohibits you from applying a herbicide) then I was told if you have to cut by hand, cut them below the water line and here's why:

    "I highlighted the hand/mechanical cutting followed by stem submergence on page 4. I think it’s worth a try. The stem submergence is critical to ensure the roots are depleted of oxygen, thereby killing the root. It is important to kill the root because cattails are able to reproduce through their creeping root system (rhizomes) and send up new vegetative shoots which can then disperse seeds. That’s why cattails are so invasive and can spread quickly. Both the living and dead cattail stems are capable of supplying the rhizomes with the necessary air exchange needed to survive, so both would need to be cut and submerged. This article had success with only a few inches of water covering the top of the cut stem whereas other research recommends 3-4 feet of stem submergence. Because there has been little work with cattail control in Alaska, it’s difficult to know what would be required. On a side note, this could be an interesting research project."

  2. #22
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    I'm guessing it depends upon what time of year you do the cutting?

  3. #23
    Junior Member russhardy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul "Happy" Gilmore View Post
    I'm guessing it depends upon what time of year you do the cutting?
    Hey Paul - According to the article that I have about cutting them below the water (which I can forward to you if you like) it does say it matters what time of year you cut the cattails. It recommends late summer early fall for best results. In fact, in one study in Iowa they cut the cattails below the water in May and reported an increase in stems the next year! So yes it matters according to at least one study.

    We have a major problem up here with them on the water that our Club uses and right now we are losing.

  4. #24
    Senior Member twall's Avatar
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    Application timing is important with perennial plants like cattails. Once the roots become larger they are harder to kill and my take multiple applications.

    Applications early in the year will burn back the tops and cause the plant to use stored nutrients to grow, weakening the plant. Applications later in the growing season when nutrinets are being stored in the roots will cause the glyphosate to move to the roots.

    The longer the cattails have been established the harder they are to kill.

    Tom
    Tom Wall

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by twall View Post

    The longer the cattails have been established the harder they are to kill.

    Tom
    Lol... You guys don't even want to see the fights I had with cat-tails last year. Probably put in a good 60 hours of work. I ruined a weed wacker and used a lot of propane on a weed burner. Sure looked nice until they all grew back. I've been told I'll have a chemical assistant this year.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Pals's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arourke View Post
    I got an out of control population under control with aquatic glycophosphate and a surfactant. I applied the glycophosphate to the cattails as they were growing rapidly. You most likely will have to retreat after you knock the population back and I do this every year with glycophosphate. I do not have a cattail problem now.
    This. I have mostly shallow water, I spray every spring, summer and fall.

    Bullrush is a major nightmare, much worse then cattails.

    In my avatar picture is the one stand I "allow" to live, its on the big pond where the depth is about 27'. I like them there, makes nice pictures and gives the dogs fits on down the shores.
    Last edited by Pals; 02-07-2013 at 11:51 AM.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Brad B's Avatar
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    We've used Polaris and Grazon with great results. I'm sure Aquaneat would work too, it's good on our bullrush. I'd keep the dogs off of it a day or two but unless they are over there eating it, it's not likely to be a problem. Apply in early spring, for us it's going to be this month as warm as it is here already. Polaris will take a while to see the results but it's a systemic so it kills the roots and all.

  8. #28

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    Muskrats!!

  9. #29
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    I use a mowing blade on a scythe; sweep blade out into water then drag back to shore below water line, cuts like a hot knife through butter.
    power without lumber, raciness without weediness

    A big man never looks down on others.... instead, he is someone to look up to.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Golddogs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sammy1 View Post
    For those who have training ponds, how are you keeping the cattails under control? Can you spray, and if so how long do the dogs need to remain out of the ponds? Mechanical methods? Cut them out? Pulling?HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Cut them below the waterline and the will die. We have had real goo luck with that.BUT........if you are talking about a large dense area, you may have to burn or spray with Aquastar and Shor-Kleer available from Aquacide. www.KillLakeWeeds.com.
    Never trust a dog to watch your food!

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