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Thread: Marking blinds, a spin off the colorblind thread...

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    Senior Member John Robinson's Avatar
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    Default Marking blinds, a spin off the colorblind thread...

    Just as we debate whether some dogs can see orange well, some judges firmly believe they can, and as a result are paranoid about marking the end of the blind. Having personally lost that prominant bush that was marking the blind in the heat of battle and handling my dog to the wrong bush, I strongly feel that judges should mark the end of the blind. This can and should be done without giving away the blind.

    John

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    Senior Member huntinman's Avatar
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    I agree John, though sometimes it's more difficult than others due to terrain, lighting, background etc...
    Bill Davis

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    Senior Member John Robinson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by walt8@cox.net View Post
    I like a definite marker for the end of the blind, but I also don't mind if that marker is a shrub, clump of grass or whatever. Having to keep my wits and remember which bush, tree, etc.. makes it all the more challenging to me, so more fun.
    We were running good Open in NJ a year back, the judges had 2 ribbons along the shore and you had to put the dogs in the channel between the two ribbons. I sent my dog and immediately put her in short of the first ribbon, mistaking it for the long one. That was a stellar moment.
    Doesn't seem to give me any advantage even when something is marked evidently.
    Walt

    PS my excuse is that I was sleep deprived that weekend, and I'm sticking to it.
    Some bushes are more prominant than others, I don't have an issue with a clearly prominant bush, but a little orange tape or even spray painting the bush, won't give away the blind.

    I ran one a while back in an amateur, had been running my dogs in the Open, so it was one of those go up to the line while a dog is returning things ask the judges where the blind is, then scope out the test deals. It was a double blind with the long one marked by the taller of three bushes. On top of that it was a pretty hard blind with weird angles back and forth across a winding ditch, then angling across the corner of a field then into the wild beyond. I ran the short blind, was negotiating that ditch back and forth feeling pretty good about it when I came up into that field, at which point I looked up and focused on the wrong bush. I only realized my mistake too late when I heard the gallery behind me exclaim, "he's handling to the wrong bush". I quickly changed gears, but the damage was done and we were out.

    As a judge I have at times been to casual marking a blind, then noticing after the fact that dogs are picking up my orange market from over 100 yards away and locking in on it like a laser guided missle, so I realize the concern. I have 20-10 vision and am pretty good about picking out something in the background to serve as a back up reference, but a clearly marked blind is nice. I guess all I'm saying is that as a judge I am sympathetic toward the older guys with less than perfect vision and try to accomodate while preserving the integrety of the sport by setting up a challenging blind where knowing the exact location of the blind is the least of your issues.

    John

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    I AM one of those older guys with less than perfect vision, coupled with some red-green color blindness. The dogs see orange better than I do. I've considered using low magnification binocs to help ensure I can see the blind. I've learned the hard way there's a BIG difference in knowing where the line to the blind and knowing where the blind is. Nothing worse than running 90% of a nice blind, then hacking up the end cause you don't know where to handle to. Anybody got tips on that?

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    Senior Member helencalif's Avatar
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    My husband is red-green colorblind. Orange is seen as gray which means it disappears into the bush, the grass, the trees, etc. His only salvation is to wear ruby red lenses in shooting glasses. Sometimes yellow lenses work, too. It depends on the lighting.

    Helen

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    Helen, thanks for the advice. I'll give that a try. I'm trusting your husband has thick skin and ignores the "Elton John" remarks?

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    Senior Member Raymond Little's Avatar
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    Wide angle binocs are very helpful when the blind is +200 yds. It takes some getting used to in order to handle and hold them with the opposite hand but it can be done.
    Just Win

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    Senior Member Brokengunz's Avatar
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    A couple of companies that sell shooting glasses make a lens that enhances orange, (EMT Lens). It was first developed for the coast guard to help find people in survival suits and rafts, Target shooters like them cuz it makes the orange targets glow. They also change some of the other colors in that spectrum (browns ect.)..................I think the dogs pick up the movement of the waving ribbon. I have seen my dogs run right over an orange bumper placed on a cement (grey) curb. They just blend in.

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    At my home club a lot of times I'd be working at another stake and when I'd get to my stake to run my dog I'd be the last one and I wouldn't see the other dogs run. One time I showed up after everyone had run and the blind wasn't marked the judge told me the blind was across the lake up into a pocket and then get up on the land and it was by the palm tree the only problem was there were about 20 palm trees there, he was nice enough to tell once I got him on the land that I was sending him to the wrong tree. Other times I've seen judges put a little stick out in an open field to mark the blind and the first dog there knocks it down and they don't put it back up. So they do need to mark it in some way to make it clear to the handler where it is and not to the dog.
    HRCH Dallys Wild Willow SH Born 11-06-97 Left Us 1-30-12 will always be in my thoughts RIP Willow

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    Senior Member helencalif's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by knash3 View Post
    Helen, thanks for the advice. I'll give that a try. I'm trusting your husband has thick skin and ignores the "Elton John" remarks?
    He doesn't get any Elton John ribbing because the other handlers are usually as old as he is and most of them are using ruby-red or yellow lens glasses and squinting, too. Some also using binoculars.

    Anybody know where you can get binocs with ruby-red or yellow lenses?

    Helen

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