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Thread: Pup will chase but not bring back

  1. #1
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    Default Pup will chase but not bring back

    I have an 11 week old pup who will chase a thrown object with plenty of vigor. Iím happy about that and Iím not too hung up on the fact that he wonít bring it back just yet. He does return to me about 30 percent of the time.

    I donít chase or correct. If he does return it I donít take it right away. I stay positive and excited.


    I donít have a hall way, I was thinking about a check cord and gently bringing him in.

    My question isÖWhen do I start to do something about this and what do I do?

  2. #2
    Member Cut em Shelby's Avatar
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    Turn around and call him while you run away. I wouldnt throw him more than 2 or 3 little marks a day.

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    Senior Member Daniel J Simoens's Avatar
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    Rope [/Ken Bora]
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    Senior Member J_Brown's Avatar
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    If you don't have a hallway, try to find a fence or long wall. Blocking off one side is better than blocking none at all. I don't have a hallway either, but found that a fence helps tremendously.

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    Be thrilled he wants to go after it, and focus on upping that drive to chase. If he starts picking it up, and taking off for the next town, get a rope. If he doesn't, no worries. Force fetch will come soon enough and after is solid, whether he will pick it up or not will be the last worry on your list.

    You can always make them pick it up, but you can't put the drive in there to chase it.
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    Me and my pup still have this problem every now and again when I throw the bumper! But check her out I just posted a video "12wk Tess" she really had a problem with this a few weeks ago! My advice is use soft toys. Example: socks, squeaky soft dock (target/petsmart), paint roller. I know you don't have a hallway but try and find a narrow place, even if it's 5 ft. If she brings it back to you once, be done until next time you work with her. The next time increase it to 2 than 3 but do not surpass 3 throws. Again, check out my video. My pup struggled with it but now she's doing 50-75 yd retrieves with a thrower. Don't worry, I worried as well but look at her now.

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    Senior Member KwickLabs's Avatar
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    My question is…When do I start to do something about this and what do I do?
    When? Yesterday!

    Go for fun, free walks in safe, big places "without" a bumper and let him "discover" how much you like it when he comes to you. Everyone wants to see their pup retrieve, but most fail to provide any input or expectation on the "joy of here". Don't throw him a bumper in wide open areas until he really likes to come to you without any expectations.

    Sure a "rope" will allow you to "reeling him in". However, in many cases the pup is rarely leash or checkcord conditioned before hand (done in the absence of retrieving). Attempting to have a pup retrieve and teach him to come at the same time while dealing with a "cold" rope just isn't a sound approach. I found out a long time ago that is backwards.

    Every year this is a regular topic. Therefore, here is a link to puppy photos of the four dogs in my signature. All four were bringing back retrieves "to hand" way before any checkcord or rope was necessary. In every case it's because "here" became fun and normal (without any force or other expectation).

    Eventually, they discover "keep away", but I don't "teach" that to them early on and it is much easier to extinguish when everything else is already in place. It is practically seamless.

    Puppy Retrieves (link)
    Last edited by KwickLabs; 02-21-2013 at 03:09 PM.
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    Senior Member Tom. P.'s Avatar
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    Very good advice!



    Quote Originally Posted by KwickLabs View Post
    When? Yesterday!

    Go for fun, free walks in safe, big places "without" a bumper and let him "discover" how much you like it when he comes to you. Everyone wants to see their pup retrieve, but most fail to provide any input or expectation on the "joy of here". Don't throw him a bumper in wide open areas until he really likes to come to you without any expectations.

    Sure a "rope" will allow you to "reeling him in". However, in many cases the pup is rarely leash or checkcord conditioned before hand (done in the absence of retrieving). Attempting to have a pup retrieve and teach him to come at the same time while dealing with a "cold" rope just isn't a sound approach. I found out a long time ago that is backwards.

    Every year this is a regular topic. Therefore, here is a link to puppy photos of the four dogs in my signature. All four were bringing back retrieves "to hand" way before any checkcord or rope was necessary. In every, case it's because "here" became fun and normal (without any force).

    Eventually, they discover "keep away", but I don't teach that to them early on and it is much easier to extinguish when everything else is already in place. It is practically seamless.

    Puppy Retrieves (link)

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    Quote Originally Posted by KwickLabs View Post
    When? Yesterday!

    Go for fun, free walks in safe, big places "without" a bumper and let him "discover" how much you like it when he comes to you. Everyone wants to see their pup retrieve, but most fail to provide any input or expectation on the "joy of here". Don't throw him a bumper in wide open areas until he really likes to come to you without any expectations.

    Sure a "rope" will allow you to "reeling him in". However, in many cases the pup is rarely leash or checkcord conditioned before hand (done in the absence of retrieving). Attempting to have a pup retrieve and teach him to come at the same time while dealing with a "cold" rope just isn't a sound approach. I found out a long time ago that is backwards.

    Every year this is a regular topic. Therefore, here is a link to puppy photos of the four dogs in my signature. All four were bringing back retrieves "to hand" way before any checkcord or rope was necessary. In every case it's because "here" became fun and normal (without any force or other expectation).

    Eventually, they discover "keep away", but I don't "teach" that to them early on and it is much easier to extinguish when everything else is already in place. It is practically seamless.

    Puppy Retrieves (link)
    Hey...advice from right around the corner. Sounds like the walk as told by Julie Knutson. I will add it to the program. He was the small one in the litter and was struggling with our cold weather but now things are different.

  10. #10
    Senior Member DarrinGreene's Avatar
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    Use two tennis balls and tease him back to you with the second one when he picks up the first. When he gets back roll the second ball for him and he will probably drop the first. Or... if he likes food better than another ball, trade him a treat for the ball.

    Give him a fun reason to come back to you, vs. reeling him in at such a young age.

    Back to the idea of setting expectations. This is along the same lines. He should expect to have FUN when he comes back to you!
    Last edited by DarrinGreene; 02-22-2013 at 08:08 AM.
    Darrin Greene

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