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Thread: Why do you suppose...

  1. #31
    Senior Member Tom. P.'s Avatar
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    Geez Guys! This is getting way deep and much to difficult to sort out!
    Specially for a Neo-Con like me!

  2. #32
    Senior Member JDogger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Bora View Post
    or conversely, you may not be ken to the depth of your own question.

    I'm pretty sure you meant Bizarre, not bazaar, but maybe not. Both work. When the flurries stopped I walked to the south yard where grows a volunteer elm from a sand pile dropped 20 years ago, for cement for fence posts. It's a messy tree, for sure, dropping seeds and leaves two times a year, but it gives shade when asked. I hugged it and said, "Bora-san does not envy your sap." The tree of course did not reply, but when I take a chain-saw to it's lower branchs later this spring it will not recognize me...JD
    One cannot reason someone out of something they were not reasoned into. - Jonathan Swift

  3. #33
    Senior Member Ken Bora's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDogger View Post
    I'm pretty sure you meant Bizarre, not bazaar, but maybe not...JD
    In North America and the United Kingdom, the term can be used as a synonym for a rummage sale, to describe charity fundraising events held by churches
    take note, I will now and again choose words with care, for effect or humor.
    many will just read right over and never see, you see?
    "So what is big is not always the Trout nor the Deer but the chance, the being there. And what is full is not necessarily the creel nor the freezer, but the memory." ~ Aldo Leopold

    "The Greatest Obstacle to Discovery is not Ignorance -- It is the Illusion of Knowledge" ~ Daniel Boorstin

  4. #34
    Senior Member HPL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Bora View Post
    In North America and the United Kingdom, the term can be used as a synonym for a rummage sale, to describe charity fundraising events held by churches
    take note, I will now and again choose words with care, for effect or humor.
    many will just read right over and never see, you see?

    Sort of like the plural of spouse is spice.
    Any doctrine that weakens personal responsibility for judgment and for action helps create the attitudes that welcome and support the totalitarian state.
    (John Dewey)

    Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for 'tis better to be alone than in bad company.
    (George Washington)

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  5. #35
    Senior Member Ken Bora's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HPL View Post
    Sort of like the plural of spouse is spice.
    um, no it is not
    When English was first developing, a period when it is called Old English (5th-12th Centuries), some important changes in pronunciation took place. One of the most important was i-mutation, also called front mutation. People who spoke Old English began to mutate the vowel in stressed syllables followed by unstressed syllables with high front sound vowells (i or j, as in Spanish Jesus). This mutation made the stressed vowel pronounced with the tongue higher and more forward in the mouth, more like the way i is pronunced. So, Mouse (mus in OE) stayed the way it was, because it wasn't followed by any syllables, but its plural (musiz) was, so it mutated to (mysiz), and later the plural ending dropped off to just mys, hence mice. The same effect can be seen in countless Germanic words, such as man, men; louse, lice; tooth, teeth; basically most of our irregulalrly pluralized words. The mutation took place in adjective and verbs too, however. For instance, old becomes elder, and sell becomes sold and buy bought (in these case the mutation took place in the present, but not the past).

    With spouse, the word entered our language long after this mutation took place, coming from French influence. Like with all other French-derived nouns, spouse's plural is made by adding an s.
    "So what is big is not always the Trout nor the Deer but the chance, the being there. And what is full is not necessarily the creel nor the freezer, but the memory." ~ Aldo Leopold

    "The Greatest Obstacle to Discovery is not Ignorance -- It is the Illusion of Knowledge" ~ Daniel Boorstin

  6. #36
    Senior Member huntinman's Avatar
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    Thanks for the vocabulary lesson Ken... Somehow it doesn't get my attention quite as well as this one:

    http://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=plpp&v=n9j_bc_vhBA
    Bill Davis

  7. #37
    Senior Member HPL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Bora View Post
    um, no it is not
    When English was first developing, a period when it is called Old English (5th-12th Centuries), some important changes in pronunciation took place. One of the most important was i-mutation, also called front mutation. People who spoke Old English began to mutate the vowel in stressed syllables followed by unstressed syllables with high front sound vowells (i or j, as in Spanish Jesus). This mutation made the stressed vowel pronounced with the tongue higher and more forward in the mouth, more like the way i is pronunced. So, Mouse (mus in OE) stayed the way it was, because it wasn't followed by any syllables, but its plural (musiz) was, so it mutated to (mysiz), and later the plural ending dropped off to just mys, hence mice. The same effect can be seen in countless Germanic words, such as man, men; louse, lice; tooth, teeth; basically most of our irregulalrly pluralized words. The mutation took place in adjective and verbs too, however. For instance, old becomes elder, and sell becomes sold and buy bought (in these case the mutation took place in the present, but not the past).

    With spouse, the word entered our language long after this mutation took place, coming from French influence. Like with all other French-derived nouns, spouse's plural is made by adding an s.

    You may be "technically" correct, but I guarantee at MY house the plural of spouse would be spice
    Any doctrine that weakens personal responsibility for judgment and for action helps create the attitudes that welcome and support the totalitarian state.
    (John Dewey)

    Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for 'tis better to be alone than in bad company.
    (George Washington)

    Gig'em Aggies!! BTCO'77HOO t.u.!!

    www.HughLieck.photoshelter.com

  8. #38
    Senior Member JDogger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Bora View Post
    In North America and the United Kingdom, the term can be used as a synonym for a rummage sale, to describe charity fundraising events held by churches
    take note, I will now and again choose words with care, for effect or humor.
    many will just read right over and never see, you see?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bazaar

    A bazaar (from Persian بازار (bāzār), meaning "market"; from Middle Persian بهاچار (bahā-chār), meaning "place of prices")[1] is a permanent enclosed merchandising area, marketplace, or street of shops where goods and services are exchanged or sold. (A souq, by contrast, is an open-air marketplace or commercial quarter.) The term is sometimes also used to refer to the "network of merchants, bankers and craftsmen" who work that area.[2] Although the current meaning of the word is believed to have originated in Persia, its use has spread and now has been accepted into the vernacular in countries around the world.[3] The rise of large bazaars and stock trading centers in the Muslim World allowed the creation of new capitals and eventually new empires. New and wealthy cities such as Isfahan, Golconda, Samarkand, Cairo, Baghdad, and Timbuktu were founded along trade routes and bazaars.[4]
    Its name in other languages includes Arabic and Urdu: بازار‎, Albanian, Bosnian and Turkish: pazar, Bengali: বাজার, Bulgarian and Macedonian: пазар, Cypriot Greek: pantopoula,[5] Greek: παζάρι (pazari), Hindi: बज़ार्, Hungarian: vásár (Persian influence around the 7th-8th century, meaning regular market, but also special occasion markets, such as Karácsonyi Vásár ("Christmas Market") and bazár (Turkish influence around the 16th-17th century, meaning Oriental-style market or shop), Indonesian and Malay: pasar, Polish: bazar, Russian: базар and Uzbek: bozor.
    In North America and the United Kingdom, the term can be used as a synonym for a "rummage sale", to describe charity fundraising events held by churches or other community organizations, in which donated used goods (such as books, clothes, and household items) are sold for low prices, or else the goods may be new and handcrafted (or home-baked), as at a church's Christmas bazaar.

    Hmmm, The quote above from Bora-san is verbatim from the Wiki cited. Perhaps that was his contribution to the free online encyclopedia. Hmmm. One wonders?? JD
    Last edited by JDogger; 02-25-2013 at 06:32 PM.
    One cannot reason someone out of something they were not reasoned into. - Jonathan Swift

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Bora View Post
    did you see on the news last night, the clip of some cnn guy. Mathews? saying President Obama should be carved into Mt. Rushmore?? for real! media bias? nope never see it
    It would probably have to be done in the appalachins where there is plenty of coal. LOL

  10. #40
    Senior Member JDogger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BuddyJ View Post
    It would probably have to be done in the appalachins where there is plenty of coal. LOL
    I'm not gonna touch this one....JD
    One cannot reason someone out of something they were not reasoned into. - Jonathan Swift

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